Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Discourses Surrounding British Widows of the First World War.

By: Smith, Angela.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: London : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014Description: 1 online resource (225 p.).ISBN: 9781780932613.Subject(s): World War, 1914-1918 -- History | World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives | World War, 1914-1918Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Discourses Surrounding British Widows of the First World WarDDC classification: 940.3 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgements; 1. Introduction; The construction of widowhood; War widowhood; Data collection; The National Archives, Kew; Charity records; Public sphere' texts; Data selection; The case studies; Analysing the data; Conclusion; 2. Theoretical approaches; Discourse, ideology, power; Ideology; Texts and social structures; The development of critical discourse analysis; Intertextuality; Presuppositions/assumptions; The discourse-historical approach; Argumentation strategies; Formulations and reformulations; Frames; Speech acts, mitigation and intensifi cation strategies
Mitigation and intensifi cation strategiesMembership categorisation; Conclusion; 3. Historical context; Social and legal construction of women as carers; Children as the future strength of the nation; Women as carers; Charitable assistance and the foundations of State welfare: notions of the deserving and the undeserving poor; Separation allowances and widows' pensions; Conclusion; 4. Case study 1: Louisa Bayliss and 'unruly' widows; Data; Mother of the nation's children: 'An unsuitable guardian'; An unruly widow: 'To keep me all my life'; Pension on the basis of need: 'I can't live on air'
Pension on the basis of moral obligation/right: 'For king and country'Compliance with the moral code: 'Her moral character has been good'; Ministry of Pensions correspondence: the obedient servant?; Conclusion; 5. Case study 2: Florence Bayliss and 'disallowed' widows; Background to post-war claims for widows' pensions; Florence Bayliss: pension disallowed; Pension as compensation: 'This is not a begging letter'; Post-war social welfare: 'This country owes me a lot'; Conclusion; 6. Conclusion; Widowhood, gender, morality and social welfare; Patriotism; Patriarchy; Eugenics and motherhood
Social welfare as remunerationBureaucracy and social control; Summary; Appendices; Appendix 1: Louisa's case fi le; Appendix 2: Florence's case fi le; Notes; Bibliography and references; Primary sources; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; L; M; N; P; R; S; T; V; W
Summary: Using extensive data - mostly gleaned from the National Archives - this book examines the way in which British widows of servicemen who died in the First World War were represented in society and by themselves, exploring the intertwining discourses of social welfare, national identity, and morality that can be identified in these texts. Focusing on two widows, the book encourages their individual stories to emerge and gives a voice to an otherwise forgotten group of women whose stories have been lost under the literary tomes of middle-class writers such as Vera Brittain and May Wedderburn Ca
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D503 .S384 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1080354 Available EBL1080354

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgements; 1. Introduction; The construction of widowhood; War widowhood; Data collection; The National Archives, Kew; Charity records; Public sphere' texts; Data selection; The case studies; Analysing the data; Conclusion; 2. Theoretical approaches; Discourse, ideology, power; Ideology; Texts and social structures; The development of critical discourse analysis; Intertextuality; Presuppositions/assumptions; The discourse-historical approach; Argumentation strategies; Formulations and reformulations; Frames; Speech acts, mitigation and intensifi cation strategies

Mitigation and intensifi cation strategiesMembership categorisation; Conclusion; 3. Historical context; Social and legal construction of women as carers; Children as the future strength of the nation; Women as carers; Charitable assistance and the foundations of State welfare: notions of the deserving and the undeserving poor; Separation allowances and widows' pensions; Conclusion; 4. Case study 1: Louisa Bayliss and 'unruly' widows; Data; Mother of the nation's children: 'An unsuitable guardian'; An unruly widow: 'To keep me all my life'; Pension on the basis of need: 'I can't live on air'

Pension on the basis of moral obligation/right: 'For king and country'Compliance with the moral code: 'Her moral character has been good'; Ministry of Pensions correspondence: the obedient servant?; Conclusion; 5. Case study 2: Florence Bayliss and 'disallowed' widows; Background to post-war claims for widows' pensions; Florence Bayliss: pension disallowed; Pension as compensation: 'This is not a begging letter'; Post-war social welfare: 'This country owes me a lot'; Conclusion; 6. Conclusion; Widowhood, gender, morality and social welfare; Patriotism; Patriarchy; Eugenics and motherhood

Social welfare as remunerationBureaucracy and social control; Summary; Appendices; Appendix 1: Louisa's case fi le; Appendix 2: Florence's case fi le; Notes; Bibliography and references; Primary sources; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; L; M; N; P; R; S; T; V; W

Using extensive data - mostly gleaned from the National Archives - this book examines the way in which British widows of servicemen who died in the First World War were represented in society and by themselves, exploring the intertwining discourses of social welfare, national identity, and morality that can be identified in these texts. Focusing on two widows, the book encourages their individual stories to emerge and gives a voice to an otherwise forgotten group of women whose stories have been lost under the literary tomes of middle-class writers such as Vera Brittain and May Wedderburn Ca

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Angela Smith is Reader in Language and Culture at the University of Sunderland, UK. She has written numerous articles and book chapters on media discourses, gender, the portrayal of immigrants and the representation of politicians.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.