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Virgil's Garden : The Nature of Bucolic Space

By: Jones, Frederick.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: London : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2013Description: 1 online resource (185 p.).ISBN: 9781472519832.Subject(s): Arcadia in literature | Country life in literature | Pastoral poetry, Latin -- History and criticism | Virgil. -- BucolicaGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Virgil's Garden : The Nature of Bucolic SpaceDDC classification: 871.01 LOC classification: PA6804.B7 -- J66 2013ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover Page -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Preface -- 1. The Generic Landscape and Bucolic Space -- 2. Flora -- 3. Fauna -- 4. Places in and out of Eclogue-land -- Places outside Greece and Italy -- Places in the Greek world -- Sicily -- Arcadia (i) -- Places in Italy -- Timavus and Illyricum -- Rome -- Cremona and Mantua -- The Mincius -- Arcadia (ii) and the Mincius -- Arcadia (iii), Gallus, and Eclogue 10 -- Places: Conclusion -- 5. Climate, Time, Geology, Geography -- Climate and time -- Geology and geography -- Mountains -- Caves, woods, springs, rivers
Bogs, mud, stones, sand -- Sea -- Natural geography: Conclusion -- 6. Human Geography -- Occupations and social roles -- Familial roles -- Dwellings -- Diet -- Human geography -- Nymphs, fauns, and satyrs -- 7. Named People -- Bucolic names -- Recurrent names -- Non-bucolic names -- Special figures (i) Virgil, Daphnis, and Polyphemus and Galatea -- Special figures (ii) Roman figures -- Bucolic charades -- Poetry and poets in Rome and Eclogue-land -- 8. Containing Reality -- Realisms and Realities -- Self-referentiality and the depiction of depiction -- Illusionism and reality effect
Landscape and painting -- Nature, art, and artifice -- the Garden -- Structure -- montage and complexity -- 9. Conclusion -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index of Passages -- General Index
Summary: Virgil's book of bucolic verse, the Eclogues, defines a green space separate from the outside worlds both of other Roman verse and of the real world of his audience. However, the boundaries between inside and outside are deliberately porous. The bucolic natives are aware of the presence of Rome, and Virgil himself is free to enter their world. Virgil's bucolic space is, in many ways, a poetic replication of the public and private gardens of his Roman audience - enclosed green spaces which afforded the citizen sheltered social and cultural activities, temporary respite from the turbule
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PA6804.B7 J66 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1394943 Available EBL1394943

Cover Page -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Preface -- 1. The Generic Landscape and Bucolic Space -- 2. Flora -- 3. Fauna -- 4. Places in and out of Eclogue-land -- Places outside Greece and Italy -- Places in the Greek world -- Sicily -- Arcadia (i) -- Places in Italy -- Timavus and Illyricum -- Rome -- Cremona and Mantua -- The Mincius -- Arcadia (ii) and the Mincius -- Arcadia (iii), Gallus, and Eclogue 10 -- Places: Conclusion -- 5. Climate, Time, Geology, Geography -- Climate and time -- Geology and geography -- Mountains -- Caves, woods, springs, rivers

Bogs, mud, stones, sand -- Sea -- Natural geography: Conclusion -- 6. Human Geography -- Occupations and social roles -- Familial roles -- Dwellings -- Diet -- Human geography -- Nymphs, fauns, and satyrs -- 7. Named People -- Bucolic names -- Recurrent names -- Non-bucolic names -- Special figures (i) Virgil, Daphnis, and Polyphemus and Galatea -- Special figures (ii) Roman figures -- Bucolic charades -- Poetry and poets in Rome and Eclogue-land -- 8. Containing Reality -- Realisms and Realities -- Self-referentiality and the depiction of depiction -- Illusionism and reality effect

Landscape and painting -- Nature, art, and artifice -- the Garden -- Structure -- montage and complexity -- 9. Conclusion -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index of Passages -- General Index

Virgil's book of bucolic verse, the Eclogues, defines a green space separate from the outside worlds both of other Roman verse and of the real world of his audience. However, the boundaries between inside and outside are deliberately porous. The bucolic natives are aware of the presence of Rome, and Virgil himself is free to enter their world. Virgil's bucolic space is, in many ways, a poetic replication of the public and private gardens of his Roman audience - enclosed green spaces which afforded the citizen sheltered social and cultural activities, temporary respite from the turbule

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Frederick Jones is Senior Lecturer in Classics, University of Liverpool, UKm and the author of Juvenal and the Satiric Genre .

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