Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The Iliad.

By: Mueller, Martin.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: London : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2013Description: 1 online resource (217 p.).ISBN: 9781472521187.Subject(s): Achilles (Greek mythology) in literature | Epic poetry, Greek -- History and criticism | Homer. -- Iliad -- Criticism, Textual | Trojan War -- Literature and the warGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The IliadDDC classification: 883.01 LOC classification: PA4037 -- .M78 2009ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- Preface to the Second Edition -- 1. Introduction -- History and the Iliad -- The poet(s) of Homer -- Homo homericus and the question of oral poetry -- The Iliad and Odyssey -- The Homeric hexameter -- Interpreting Homeric repetitions -- 2. The Plot of the Iliad -- Achilles, Hektor and the Fall of Troy -- Achilles in Book 1 -- Hektor during the absence of Achilles -- The Embassy -- The Patrokleia -- Hektor after the death of Patroklos -- The death of Hektor and the structure of the Iliad -- 3. Fighting in the Iliad -- The ethos of Homeric fighting
The individual encounter -- Necrologues and gloating speeches -- Narrative patterns beyond the individual encounter -- The progress of battle -- 4. The Similes -- The narrative function of the similes -- The content of similes -- The function of detail: the lion similes -- Contrast and significance in the Iliadic image -- The Homeric simile and the epic tradition -- 5. The Gods -- Human and divine motivation -- The Homeric gods and their society -- 6. Homeric Repetitions -- The distribution of repetitions across the poems -- Different patterns of repetition in the Iliad and Odyssey
Classifying repetitions by type: who speaks? -- Rare repetitions, clustering and interdependence -- 7. The Composition of the Iliad -- The development of the epic poem -- The stages of the Iliad: a rough sketch -- 8. The Life of the Iliad -- First reflections of the Iliad: the Odyssey, tragedy and Plato -- Homer and Vergil -- The matter of Troy, Chapman and Shakespeare -- Milton and Pope -- The Iliad in a world of prose -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- X -- Y -- Z
Summary: No Western text boasts a life as long as the ""Iliad"", and few can match its energy and glory. This introduction to Homer's poem sees it as rooted in a particular culture with narrative and thematic conventions that are only partly explained by assumptions about the properties of oral poetry. Professor Mueller follows Plato and Aristotle in seeing the plot of the ""Iliad"" as a distinctly Homeric 'invention' which shaped Attic tragedy and the concept of dramatic action in Western literature. In this second edition the text has been revised in many places, and a new chapter on Homeric repetiti
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PA4037 .M78 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1426803 Available EBL1426803

Cover -- Contents -- Preface to the Second Edition -- 1. Introduction -- History and the Iliad -- The poet(s) of Homer -- Homo homericus and the question of oral poetry -- The Iliad and Odyssey -- The Homeric hexameter -- Interpreting Homeric repetitions -- 2. The Plot of the Iliad -- Achilles, Hektor and the Fall of Troy -- Achilles in Book 1 -- Hektor during the absence of Achilles -- The Embassy -- The Patrokleia -- Hektor after the death of Patroklos -- The death of Hektor and the structure of the Iliad -- 3. Fighting in the Iliad -- The ethos of Homeric fighting

The individual encounter -- Necrologues and gloating speeches -- Narrative patterns beyond the individual encounter -- The progress of battle -- 4. The Similes -- The narrative function of the similes -- The content of similes -- The function of detail: the lion similes -- Contrast and significance in the Iliadic image -- The Homeric simile and the epic tradition -- 5. The Gods -- Human and divine motivation -- The Homeric gods and their society -- 6. Homeric Repetitions -- The distribution of repetitions across the poems -- Different patterns of repetition in the Iliad and Odyssey

Classifying repetitions by type: who speaks? -- Rare repetitions, clustering and interdependence -- 7. The Composition of the Iliad -- The development of the epic poem -- The stages of the Iliad: a rough sketch -- 8. The Life of the Iliad -- First reflections of the Iliad: the Odyssey, tragedy and Plato -- Homer and Vergil -- The matter of Troy, Chapman and Shakespeare -- Milton and Pope -- The Iliad in a world of prose -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- X -- Y -- Z

No Western text boasts a life as long as the ""Iliad"", and few can match its energy and glory. This introduction to Homer's poem sees it as rooted in a particular culture with narrative and thematic conventions that are only partly explained by assumptions about the properties of oral poetry. Professor Mueller follows Plato and Aristotle in seeing the plot of the ""Iliad"" as a distinctly Homeric 'invention' which shaped Attic tragedy and the concept of dramatic action in Western literature. In this second edition the text has been revised in many places, and a new chapter on Homeric repetiti

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Martin Mueller is Professor of English and Classics at Northwestern University. He is the author of "Children of Oedipus and Other Essays on the Imitation of greek Tragedy, 1500-1800". Together with Ahuvia Kahane, he edited The Chicago Homer, a multilingual database that uses the search and display capabilities of electronic texts to make the distinctive features of early Greek epic accessible to readers with and without Greek (http://www.library.northwestern.edu/homer).

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.