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American Foreign Policy : Alliance Politics in a Century of War, 1914-2014

By: Peterson, James W.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014Description: 1 online resource (217 p.).ISBN: 9781623564094.Subject(s): Alliances | Cold War -- Diplomatic history | United States -- Foreign relations -- 20th century | United States -- History, Military -- 20th century | United States -- History, Military -- 21st century | World War, 1914-1918 -- Diplomatic history | World War, 1939-1945 -- Diplomatic historyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: American Foreign Policy : Alliance Politics in a Century of War, 1914-2014DDC classification: 355.00973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- 1914 -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: 1914-An Abrupt End to a Century and a Quarter of Isolationism -- Part One Alliance Networks and the Defeat of German and Japanese Power: Early Twentieth-Century Hot Wars, 1914-1945 -- 1 World War I, Temporary Alliance Networks, and American Leadership, 1914-1918 -- 2 World War II, Permanent Alliances, and American Internationalism, 1931-1945 -- Part Two Role of Alliances in Containing the Power of the Soviet Union: Late Twentieth-Century Cold War, 1945-1991
3 War of Nerves with the Soviet Union: A Broad but Shaky Containment Alliance, 1945-1991 -- 4 Korean War: A Small Pacific-Based Containment Alliance and Stalemate, 1950-1953 -- 5 War in Southeast Asia: Absence of Allies, Noncontainment, and Defeat, 1964-1973 -- Part Three Creation of Alliances to Restrict and Defeat Rogue State Power: Immediate Post-Cold War Period -- 6 American-Led, United Nations-Based Alliance to Check Saddam and Iraq, 1990-1991 -- 7 American-Led, NATO-Based Alliance to Check Milošević and Serbia, 1992-1999
Part Four Utility and Disutility of Alliances in Dealing with Challenges from Terrorist Power, 2001-2014 -- 8 America, NATO, and the War in Afghanistan, 2001-2014 -- 9 America, Coalition of the Willing, and the War in Iraq, 2003-2011 -- 10 Arab Spring, Discussions within Alliances, and the Potential for War, 2011-2014 -- Conclusion: 2014-Reflections on a Century of War and an Abrupt Transition to New Conflicts -- "Mazar" -- References -- Index
Summary: The text aims to uncover the roots of the United States' near perpetual involvement in war since the beginning of WWI in 1914. Using alliance politics as the main framework of analysis, it offers a new interpretation that contrasts with the traditional views that war is an interruption of the American foreign policy emphasis on diplomacy. Instead, it posits that war has been the norm during the past century while peaceful interludes were but a time of respite and preparation for the next conflict. After a thorough discussion of the concepts of alliance building and the containment doctrine,
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E745 .P397 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1637126 Available EBL1637126

Cover -- Contents -- 1914 -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: 1914-An Abrupt End to a Century and a Quarter of Isolationism -- Part One Alliance Networks and the Defeat of German and Japanese Power: Early Twentieth-Century Hot Wars, 1914-1945 -- 1 World War I, Temporary Alliance Networks, and American Leadership, 1914-1918 -- 2 World War II, Permanent Alliances, and American Internationalism, 1931-1945 -- Part Two Role of Alliances in Containing the Power of the Soviet Union: Late Twentieth-Century Cold War, 1945-1991

3 War of Nerves with the Soviet Union: A Broad but Shaky Containment Alliance, 1945-1991 -- 4 Korean War: A Small Pacific-Based Containment Alliance and Stalemate, 1950-1953 -- 5 War in Southeast Asia: Absence of Allies, Noncontainment, and Defeat, 1964-1973 -- Part Three Creation of Alliances to Restrict and Defeat Rogue State Power: Immediate Post-Cold War Period -- 6 American-Led, United Nations-Based Alliance to Check Saddam and Iraq, 1990-1991 -- 7 American-Led, NATO-Based Alliance to Check Milošević and Serbia, 1992-1999

Part Four Utility and Disutility of Alliances in Dealing with Challenges from Terrorist Power, 2001-2014 -- 8 America, NATO, and the War in Afghanistan, 2001-2014 -- 9 America, Coalition of the Willing, and the War in Iraq, 2003-2011 -- 10 Arab Spring, Discussions within Alliances, and the Potential for War, 2011-2014 -- Conclusion: 2014-Reflections on a Century of War and an Abrupt Transition to New Conflicts -- "Mazar" -- References -- Index

The text aims to uncover the roots of the United States' near perpetual involvement in war since the beginning of WWI in 1914. Using alliance politics as the main framework of analysis, it offers a new interpretation that contrasts with the traditional views that war is an interruption of the American foreign policy emphasis on diplomacy. Instead, it posits that war has been the norm during the past century while peaceful interludes were but a time of respite and preparation for the next conflict. After a thorough discussion of the concepts of alliance building and the containment doctrine,

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Peterson (Valdosta State Univ.) discusses four periods of American foreign policy over the past century: the two World Wars (1914-1945), the Cold War (1945-1991), the immediate post-Cold War (1990-2001), and the global war on terror (2001-2014). The discussion is nominally organized around what Peterson calls "alliance theory." However, the central concept of "alliance" is not clearly defined, as the author uses the term as a description of such different entities as the UN, NATO, the EU, and even the US-Soviet Union dyad with respect to arms control efforts. The majority of the book consists of oversimplified summaries of the four periods, with foreign policy textbooks serving as the main sources. Section conclusions refer to alliance theory, but the application of the theory is brief and inconsistent. For example, the author's theory identifies three types of influences that affect alliance strength; however, on at least one occasion, Peterson discusses these influences as they pertain to regions of conflict, not to alliance members. The work is inundated with grammatical, stylistic, and typographical errors and, to a lesser extent, factual errors. --Clifton W. Sherrill, Troy University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James W. Peterson is Professor of Political Science and Head of the Department of Political Science at Valdosta State University, USA. He has previously authored two books that focus on NATO.

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