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The Consolations of Writing : Literary Strategies of Resistance from Boethius to Primo Levi

By: Zim, Rivkah.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (337 p.).ISBN: 9781400852093.Subject(s): Autobiography | Politics and literature | Politics in literature | Prisoners’ writings -- History and criticism | Protest literature -- History and criticism | Psychic trauma in literature | Underground literature -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Consolations of Writing : Literary Strategies of Resistance from Boethius to Primo LeviDDC classification: 809.93353 | 809/.93353 LOC classification: PN51 .Z485 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; CONTENTS; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part I. In Defense of Civilization; 1. The Disciplines of Reason and Lyric Poetry; Anicius Boethius, Of the Consolation of Philosophy (ca. 524-­25): The Foundations of Resistance in Dialogue and Lyric; Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Letters and Papers from Prison (1943-­45): Christian Ethics and Lyric; 2. Creative Dialogues with Textual Partners, Past and Present; Thomas More, A Dialogue of Comfort against Tribulation: A Political Guide to the Dilemmas of Religious Conscience (1534-­35)
Antonio Gramsci, Prison Letters (1926-­37): Dialogue in DialecticPart II. Preservation of Self; 3. Memory and Self­Justification: Images of Grace and Disgrace Abounding; John Bunyan, Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners (1666): Writing the Eternally Present Self; Oscar Wilde, De Profundis (1897): A Pastoral Letter of Disgrace Abounding; 4. Memorial Narratives as Salvation for the Feminine Self; Marie­Jeanne Roland, Memoirs (1793): Writing History Herself; Anne Frank, The Diary and Tales from the Secret Annexe (1942-­44): Life Writing; 5. The Consolations of Imagination and Lyric Poetry
Jean Cassou, Trente­trois sonnets composés au secret / 33 Sonnets of the Resistance (1943): Preserving the Liberty of a PoetIrina Ratushinskaya, Pencil Letter and No, I'm Not Afraid (1982-­86): Preserving the Life of a Poet; Part III. Testimony for Mankind; 6. With Hindsight and Beyond Resistance; Primo Levi, If This Is a Man (1947) and Ad ora incerta (1947-­86): Resisting the Demolition of a Man; Primo Levi, Moments of Reprieve (1981): In Defense of Civilization; Conclusion: Beyond Testimony; Select Bibliography; Index
Summary: Boethius wrote The Consolation of Philosophy as a prisoner condemned to death for treason, circumstances that are reflected in the themes and concerns of its evocative poetry and dialogue between the prisoner and his mentor, Lady Philosophy. This classic philosophical statement of late antiquity has had an enduring influence on Western thought. It is also the earliest example of what Rivkah Zim identifies as a distinctive and vitally important medium of literary resistance: writing in captivity by prisoners of conscience and persecuted minorities. The Consolations of Writing reveals why the
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Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; CONTENTS; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part I. In Defense of Civilization; 1. The Disciplines of Reason and Lyric Poetry; Anicius Boethius, Of the Consolation of Philosophy (ca. 524-­25): The Foundations of Resistance in Dialogue and Lyric; Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Letters and Papers from Prison (1943-­45): Christian Ethics and Lyric; 2. Creative Dialogues with Textual Partners, Past and Present; Thomas More, A Dialogue of Comfort against Tribulation: A Political Guide to the Dilemmas of Religious Conscience (1534-­35)

Antonio Gramsci, Prison Letters (1926-­37): Dialogue in DialecticPart II. Preservation of Self; 3. Memory and Self­Justification: Images of Grace and Disgrace Abounding; John Bunyan, Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners (1666): Writing the Eternally Present Self; Oscar Wilde, De Profundis (1897): A Pastoral Letter of Disgrace Abounding; 4. Memorial Narratives as Salvation for the Feminine Self; Marie­Jeanne Roland, Memoirs (1793): Writing History Herself; Anne Frank, The Diary and Tales from the Secret Annexe (1942-­44): Life Writing; 5. The Consolations of Imagination and Lyric Poetry

Jean Cassou, Trente­trois sonnets composés au secret / 33 Sonnets of the Resistance (1943): Preserving the Liberty of a PoetIrina Ratushinskaya, Pencil Letter and No, I'm Not Afraid (1982-­86): Preserving the Life of a Poet; Part III. Testimony for Mankind; 6. With Hindsight and Beyond Resistance; Primo Levi, If This Is a Man (1947) and Ad ora incerta (1947-­86): Resisting the Demolition of a Man; Primo Levi, Moments of Reprieve (1981): In Defense of Civilization; Conclusion: Beyond Testimony; Select Bibliography; Index

Boethius wrote The Consolation of Philosophy as a prisoner condemned to death for treason, circumstances that are reflected in the themes and concerns of its evocative poetry and dialogue between the prisoner and his mentor, Lady Philosophy. This classic philosophical statement of late antiquity has had an enduring influence on Western thought. It is also the earliest example of what Rivkah Zim identifies as a distinctive and vitally important medium of literary resistance: writing in captivity by prisoners of conscience and persecuted minorities. The Consolations of Writing reveals why the

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

"From Boethius to Primo Levi," according to Zim (King's College, London) in this revelatory study, prisoners of conscience and detained members of persecuted minorities have employed a variety of literary strategies to resist the injustice of coerced confinement, probe the meaning of existence, and salve the anguish of deracinated selves. By creatively juxtaposing pairs of victimized individuals across cultural and temporal lines, Zim demonstrates convincingly that prison narratives constitute a distinctive, though difficult to define, genre of expression that manifests itself through characteristic forms, themes, and functions. Collectively, these writings in extremis, be they letters, poems, journal entries, philosophical treatises, theological musings, analytical essays, or personal confessions, testify eloquently to the resiliency of besieged human beings as they struggle courageously against the ravages of unwarranted deprivations to maintain mind and body and preserve the core civilizing values that have sustained people through the ages. Zim's close readings of these in-tandem texts bear haunting witness to enduring conditions in the world that ought not to be but unfathomably are, despite all the vociferous protestations that decry inhumane treatment of the other. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Howard Ira Einsohn, Middlesex Community College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Rivkah Zim teaches early modern English and comparative literature at King's College London. She is the author of English Metrical Psalms: Poetry as Praise and Prayer, 1535-1601.

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