Afterlives : Allegories of Film and Mortality in Early Weimar Germany

By: Choe, SteveMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandThinking Cinema: Publisher: New York : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014Description: 1 online resource (289 p.)ISBN: 9781441186454Subject(s): Motion pictures -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Motion pictures -- PhilosophyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Afterlives: Allegories of Film and Mortality in Early Weimar GermanyDDC classification: 791.4309 LOC classification: PN1993.5.G3 -- .C46 2014ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover ; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Two Postwar Masculinities Robert Reinert's Nerves (1919); 2 Melancholy Specters F. W. Murnau's The Haunted Castle (1921) and Phantom (1922); 3 The Temporality of Destiny Fritz Lang's Destiny (1921); 4 The Cinematic Other Paul Wegener's The Golem: How He Came Into the World (1920); 5 Technologies of Revenge Fritz Lang's The Nibelungen (1924) and Arthur Robison's Warning Shadows (1923) ; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Filmography; Index
Summary: Weimar cultural critics and intellectuals have repeatedly linked the dynamic movement of the cinema to discourses of life and animation. Correspondingly, recent film historians and theorists have taken up these discourses to theorize the moving image, both in analog and digital. But, many important issues are overlooked. Combining close readings of individual films with detailed interpretations of philosophical texts, all produced in Weimar Germany immediately following the Great War, <i>Afterlives: Allegories of Film and Mortality in Early Weimar Germany</i> shows how these films teach viewer
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN1993.5.G3 C46 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1718522 Available EBL1718522

Cover ; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Two Postwar Masculinities Robert Reinert's Nerves (1919); 2 Melancholy Specters F. W. Murnau's The Haunted Castle (1921) and Phantom (1922); 3 The Temporality of Destiny Fritz Lang's Destiny (1921); 4 The Cinematic Other Paul Wegener's The Golem: How He Came Into the World (1920); 5 Technologies of Revenge Fritz Lang's The Nibelungen (1924) and Arthur Robison's Warning Shadows (1923) ; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Filmography; Index

Weimar cultural critics and intellectuals have repeatedly linked the dynamic movement of the cinema to discourses of life and animation. Correspondingly, recent film historians and theorists have taken up these discourses to theorize the moving image, both in analog and digital. But, many important issues are overlooked. Combining close readings of individual films with detailed interpretations of philosophical texts, all produced in Weimar Germany immediately following the Great War, <i>Afterlives: Allegories of Film and Mortality in Early Weimar Germany</i> shows how these films teach viewer

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Choe (cinema and comparative literature, Univ. of Iowa) sets about retheorizing early German cinema through an investigation of film as thought and ontology. Providing a mixture of philosophical, historical, and aesthetic analyses, the author interrogates films such as The Golem, Destiny, and The Nibelungen as engaging in particular modes of philosophical thinking about postwar themes including loss, life, death, and utopia. To demonstrate this idea, he crosscuts between reflections on films of the period, film as such, and contemporaneous and current thinkers and philosophers like Bergson, Freud, Heidegger, Simmel, Deleuze, and Gunning. Choe's elucidation of the multiple ways by and through which film can enter into dialogue with philosophical modes of thought is one of the strongest aspects of this unique work. In places, however, the thinkers discussed can feel either arbitrary or overwhelming in number-such is the case with the extended discussion of two sonnets by Austro-Hungarian poet Rainer Maria Rilke, who is erroneously glossed as having fought for Germany. Nonetheless, this work will be useful for scholars of early-20th-century thought as well as Weimar cinema and film theory. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. --Jonathan O. Wipplinger, North Carolina State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Steve Choe is Associate Professor of CInema at San Francisco State University, USA.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.