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Impact of Organized Crime on Murder of Law Enforcement Personnel at the U.S.-Mexican Border.

By: Schatz, Sara.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.SpringerBriefs in Sociology: Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2014Description: 1 online resource (125 p.).ISBN: 9789401792493.Subject(s): Crime prevention | Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States | Organized crime -- MexicoGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Impact of Organized Crime on Murder of Law Enforcement Personnel at the U.S.-Mexican BorderDDC classification: 301 | 364.973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface; Contents; 1 Backdrop to the Assassination of Local Law Enforcement; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Law Enforcement Assassination in the Mexican "Drug-War" Context; 1.2.1 Institutional Limitations, Impunity and Law-Enforcement Assassination; 1.2.2 Spill-Over Arms Supplies and Their Impact; 1.2.3 A Change in the Tactical Balance of Power; 1.2.4 The Power of the Gun; 1.3 A Multiplicity of Motives for Law-Enforcement Assassination; 1.3.1 A Systemic Pattern of Assassinations; 1.4 Northern Tier Mexican States and Mexico-US Ports of Entry; 1.4.1 The Selection of Northern Tier States
1.4.2 US Ports of Entry: Urban or Rural?References; 2 Rub Outs in the Territory: Killing Police Chiefs and Top-Level Commanders in Chihuahua; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Opportunity, Motivation and Law-Enforcement Assassination; 2.2.1 Targeted, Strategic Hits; 2.2.2 Gaps in the Data; 2.2.3 Methods; 2.2.4 Simultaneousness and Opportunity; 2.2.5 Chihuahua and the Northern Mexican Tier (2008-2012): Cop-Killing Without Punishment?; 2.3 Goals of Organized Crime Elements; 2.3.1 A "Bird's Eye" View of Law-Enforcement Assassination; 2.3.2 Retaliation for Prosecution
2.3.3 Other Assassinated Police Chiefs and Commanders: The New, "Neutral" or Otherwise Unsuitable to Organized Crime2.3.4 Intermittent Local Governance; 2.3.5 A Broader Attack on Rule of Law Personnel for Greater Freedom for Movement of Goods; 2.4 Law-Enforcement Assassinations in Strategic Towns; 2.4.1 Highway Routes Where Assassinations Occur; 2.4.2 Influencing the Selection of Police ChiefsMass Police Resignations; 2.4.3 Broader Attacks on Rule of Law Enforcement for the Movement of Goods
2.4.4 Law-Enforcement Assassinations, Reducing Police Presence and Halting of the Rule of Law in Other Northern Tier States2.4.5 Law-Enforcement Assassinations, Attacks on Police Stations in Strategic Small-Towns and Message Sending in Other Northern Tier States; 2.4.6 The Removal of New, Neutral andor Police Chiefs and Commanders Unsuitable to Organized CrimeBroader Attacks on Rule of Law Enforcement for the Movement of Goods in Other Northern Tier States; 2.5 Conclusion; References; 3 Weapons and Methods of Attack as a Tactical Advantage; 3.1 Introduction
3.2 Considerations Regarding Weaponry3.2.1 Extreme Weaponization; 3.2.2 A Relative Lack of High-Powered Weapons at the Municipal Level; 3.3 Armed Vehicular Assaults; 3.3.1 Data Description; 3.3.2 Vehicular Attacks; 3.3.3 Convoy-Style Ambush Attacks; 3.3.4 Lack of Vehicular Protection Means Certain Death; 3.3.5 On and Off-Duty Victims; 3.3.6 Little or No Opportunity for Self-Defense; 3.3.7 Types of High-Powered Weaponry Utilized; 3.3.8 Effective Attack Method; 3.3.9 Selective Targeted Hits and the Repeated Firing of Assault Rifles
3.3.10 Who Survives Armed Vehicular Attacks? T6+ Levels of Bullet-Proofing
Summary: This brief fills a gap in the studies of organized crime in Mexico (Kan 2012, Rios 2011, Dell 2011) by documenting and mapping the post-2008 assassination of Mexican border police chiefs. It traces out a "systematic" of law-enforcement assassination in Northern Tier Mexico, showing how the selective, often sequential, hits by cartels on chiefs in border towns and along key drug-trafficking corridors has proven an effective strategy by organized crime elements to serve several goals: (1) to retaliate for federal, state and local prosecution, (2) to try and neutralize police chiefs, (3) to achie
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV9950 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1783802 Available EBL1783802

Preface; Contents; 1 Backdrop to the Assassination of Local Law Enforcement; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Law Enforcement Assassination in the Mexican "Drug-War" Context; 1.2.1 Institutional Limitations, Impunity and Law-Enforcement Assassination; 1.2.2 Spill-Over Arms Supplies and Their Impact; 1.2.3 A Change in the Tactical Balance of Power; 1.2.4 The Power of the Gun; 1.3 A Multiplicity of Motives for Law-Enforcement Assassination; 1.3.1 A Systemic Pattern of Assassinations; 1.4 Northern Tier Mexican States and Mexico-US Ports of Entry; 1.4.1 The Selection of Northern Tier States

1.4.2 US Ports of Entry: Urban or Rural?References; 2 Rub Outs in the Territory: Killing Police Chiefs and Top-Level Commanders in Chihuahua; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Opportunity, Motivation and Law-Enforcement Assassination; 2.2.1 Targeted, Strategic Hits; 2.2.2 Gaps in the Data; 2.2.3 Methods; 2.2.4 Simultaneousness and Opportunity; 2.2.5 Chihuahua and the Northern Mexican Tier (2008-2012): Cop-Killing Without Punishment?; 2.3 Goals of Organized Crime Elements; 2.3.1 A "Bird's Eye" View of Law-Enforcement Assassination; 2.3.2 Retaliation for Prosecution

2.3.3 Other Assassinated Police Chiefs and Commanders: The New, "Neutral" or Otherwise Unsuitable to Organized Crime2.3.4 Intermittent Local Governance; 2.3.5 A Broader Attack on Rule of Law Personnel for Greater Freedom for Movement of Goods; 2.4 Law-Enforcement Assassinations in Strategic Towns; 2.4.1 Highway Routes Where Assassinations Occur; 2.4.2 Influencing the Selection of Police ChiefsMass Police Resignations; 2.4.3 Broader Attacks on Rule of Law Enforcement for the Movement of Goods

2.4.4 Law-Enforcement Assassinations, Reducing Police Presence and Halting of the Rule of Law in Other Northern Tier States2.4.5 Law-Enforcement Assassinations, Attacks on Police Stations in Strategic Small-Towns and Message Sending in Other Northern Tier States; 2.4.6 The Removal of New, Neutral andor Police Chiefs and Commanders Unsuitable to Organized CrimeBroader Attacks on Rule of Law Enforcement for the Movement of Goods in Other Northern Tier States; 2.5 Conclusion; References; 3 Weapons and Methods of Attack as a Tactical Advantage; 3.1 Introduction

3.2 Considerations Regarding Weaponry3.2.1 Extreme Weaponization; 3.2.2 A Relative Lack of High-Powered Weapons at the Municipal Level; 3.3 Armed Vehicular Assaults; 3.3.1 Data Description; 3.3.2 Vehicular Attacks; 3.3.3 Convoy-Style Ambush Attacks; 3.3.4 Lack of Vehicular Protection Means Certain Death; 3.3.5 On and Off-Duty Victims; 3.3.6 Little or No Opportunity for Self-Defense; 3.3.7 Types of High-Powered Weaponry Utilized; 3.3.8 Effective Attack Method; 3.3.9 Selective Targeted Hits and the Repeated Firing of Assault Rifles

3.3.10 Who Survives Armed Vehicular Attacks? T6+ Levels of Bullet-Proofing

This brief fills a gap in the studies of organized crime in Mexico (Kan 2012, Rios 2011, Dell 2011) by documenting and mapping the post-2008 assassination of Mexican border police chiefs. It traces out a "systematic" of law-enforcement assassination in Northern Tier Mexico, showing how the selective, often sequential, hits by cartels on chiefs in border towns and along key drug-trafficking corridors has proven an effective strategy by organized crime elements to serve several goals: (1) to retaliate for federal, state and local prosecution, (2) to try and neutralize police chiefs, (3) to achie

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sara Schatz is a criminology expert currently affiliated with Ohio State University, as an assistant professor for Latin American Studies. She received her PhD. in Sociology at UCLA, an M.A. in Latin American Studies from UC Berkeley and an M.A. in International Development from UCLA. Her research specializes in the political and legal situation in Mexico.

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