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Remembering Jim Crow : African Americans Tell About Life in the Segregated South

By: Chafe, William H.
Contributor(s): Gavins, Raymond | Korstad, Robert.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : New Press, The, 2014Description: 1 online resource (401 p.).ISBN: 9781620970430.Subject(s): African Americans -- Civil rights -- Southern States -- History | African Americans -- Segregation -- Southern States -- History | African Americans -- Southern States -- Interviews | Oral history | Southern States -- Race relationsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Remembering Jim Crow : African Americans Tell About Life in the Segregated SouthDDC classification: 305.896/073075 | 975 | 975.00496073 LOC classification: E185.61Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Editorial Method; Introduction; One Bitter Truths; Two Heritage and Memory; Three Families and Communities; Four Lessons Well Learned; Five Work; Six Resistance and Political Struggles; Appendix; Suggestions for Further Reading; Index
Summary: Praised as “viscerally powerful" (Publishers Weekly), this remarkable work of oral history captures the searing experience of the Jim Crow years—enriched by memories of individual, family, and community triumphs and tragedies. In vivid, compelling accounts, men and women from all walks of life tell how their day-to-day lives were subjected to profound and unrelenting racial oppression. At the same time, Remembering Jim Crow is a testament to how black Southerners fought back against the system—raising children, building churches and schools, running businesses, and struggling for respect in a society that denied them the most basic rights. The result is a powerful story of individual and community survival and an important part of the American past that is crucial for us to remember.Based on interviews collected by the Behind the Veil Project at Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies, this landmark in African American oral history is now available in an affordable paperback edition and, for the first time, as an e-book with audio.
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Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Editorial Method; Introduction; One Bitter Truths; Two Heritage and Memory; Three Families and Communities; Four Lessons Well Learned; Five Work; Six Resistance and Political Struggles; Appendix; Suggestions for Further Reading; Index

Praised as “viscerally powerful" (Publishers Weekly), this remarkable work of oral history captures the searing experience of the Jim Crow years—enriched by memories of individual, family, and community triumphs and tragedies. In vivid, compelling accounts, men and women from all walks of life tell how their day-to-day lives were subjected to profound and unrelenting racial oppression. At the same time, Remembering Jim Crow is a testament to how black Southerners fought back against the system—raising children, building churches and schools, running businesses, and struggling for respect in a society that denied them the most basic rights. The result is a powerful story of individual and community survival and an important part of the American past that is crucial for us to remember.Based on interviews collected by the Behind the Veil Project at Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies, this landmark in African American oral history is now available in an affordable paperback edition and, for the first time, as an e-book with audio.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This sequel to Remembering Slavery (LJ 9/1/98) is another effort to recover the history of black life in the American South, with interviews this time focusing on the era of segregation. It is a rare opportunity to read and hear the voices of black Southerners who experienced one of the most hideous periods in America's history, "a time of severe legal, economic, political, and social oppression, all reinforced by the pervasive threat of extralegal violence, especially lynching." Based on about 1200 interviews and in-depth research in 25 communities and ten different states undertaken by the Behind the Veil project at Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies, this remarkable book-and-CD set offers intimate views into the thoughts, activities, and anxieties of black Americans and at the same time strengthens our understanding of the Jim Crow era. Included are two one-hour CDs of the radio documentary produced by American Radio Works, a transcript of the audio program, 50 rare segregation-era photographs, biographical information, and suggestions for further reading. This superb primary source will appeal to public and academic libraries. Edward G. McCormack, Univ. of Southern Mississippi Gulf Coast Lib., Long Beach (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Every academic library in the country should own this wonderful volume and the two accompanying audio CDs, a "greatest hits" collection of over 1,200 interviews of African Americans who lived in the Jim Crow South. The interviews were conducted over a period of several years in the 1990s, under the auspices of the "Behind the Veil" project. The tapes have been deposited in various libraries, and over 120 of the interviews have been transcribed. This volume compiles selected portions of some of the interviews, divided by themes such as "work," "heritage and memory," "lessons well learned," and others. The editors, prominent historians at Duke University well versed in the scholarship of the era, explain how the interviews constitute a "compelling body of evidence" that fleshes out "the incredible variety, richness, and ingenuity of black Americans' responses to one of the cruelest, least yielding social and economic systems ever created." The CDs of the recorded interviews (from the National Public Radio production) give yet more aural life to these ordinary yet remarkable individuals. Ideal for classroom use; enriching reading for all. Buy it--now. Highly recommended for all libraries. P. Harvey University of Colorado at Colorado Springs

Author notes provided by Syndetics

William H. Chafe , project director of Behind the Veil, is a professor emeritus of history and the Alice Mary Baldwin Professor of History emeritus at Duke University's Sanford School of Public Policy and the author of multiple books. Raymond Gavins , project director of Behind the Veil, is a professor of history at Duke University and the author of The Perils and Prospects of Southern Black Leadership . Robert Korstad , project director of Behind the Veil, is an associate professor of public policy studies and history at Duke University and the author of two books. Chafe, Gavins, and Korstad live in Durham, North Carolina.<br>

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