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The War of 1812, Conflict and Deception : The British Attempt to Seize New Orleans and Nullify the Louisiana Purchase

By: Drez, Ronald J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (409 p.).ISBN: 9780807159323.Subject(s): History -- War of 1812 | New Orleans, Battle of, New Orleans, La., 1815 | United States -- History -- War of 1812Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The War of 1812, Conflict and Deception : The British Attempt to Seize New Orleans and Nullify the Louisiana PurchaseDDC classification: 973.5/2 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; Time Line for Louisiana; Time Line Leading to the Battle of New Orleans; Introduction: The Enigma; 1. Louisiana; 2. Resentment and Provocation; 3. Fatal Confrontations: The Leander Affair, and Chesapeake versus Leopard; 4. British Demands and Madison's Resistance; 5. On to Canada: War and Reality; 6. The Eagle against the Leviathan; 7. Finally a General, or Two; 8. War and Deception; 9. The Grand Offensive; 10. The Final Attack; Epilogue; Appendix: War Secretary Lord Bathurst's Letter to Major General Pakenham, October 24, 1814; Notes; Bibliography
IndexA; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y
Summary: Perhaps no conflict in American history is more important yet more overlooked and misunderstood than the War of 1812. Begun by President James Madison after decades of humiliating British trade interference and impressment of American sailors, the war in many ways was the second battle for United States independence.At the climax of the war-inspired by the defeat of Napoleon in early 1814 and the perceived illegality of the Louisiana Purchase-the British devised a plan to launch a three-pronged attack against the northern, eastern, and southern U.S. borders. Concealing preparations for this strike by engaging in negotiations in Ghent, Britain meanwhile secretly issued orders to seize New Orleans and wrest control of the Mississippi and the lands west of the river. They further instructed British commander General Edward Pakenham not to cease his attack if he heard rumors of a peace treaty. Great Britain even covertly installed government officials within military units with the intention of immediately taking over administrative control once the territory was conquered.According to author Ronald J. Drez, the British strategy and the successful defense of New Orleans through the leadership of General Andrew Jackson affirm the serious implications of this climatic -battle. Far from being simply an unnecessary epilogue to the War of 1812, the Battle of New Orleans firmly secured for the United States the territory acquired through the Louisiana Purchase.Through the use of primary sources, Drez provides a deeper understanding of Britain''s objectives, and The War of 1812, Conflict and Deception offers a compelling account of this pivotal moment in American history.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E354 .D74 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1689354 Available EBL1689354
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E342.1.M2 A44 2012 Dolley Madison : E354 The War of 1812 : E354 .A38 2011 After Tippecanoe : E354 .D74 2014 The War of 1812, Conflict and Deception : E354 .E97 2012 1812 : E354 .H53 2012 The War of 1812 : E354 .H53 2012 The War of 1812 :

Cover; Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; Time Line for Louisiana; Time Line Leading to the Battle of New Orleans; Introduction: The Enigma; 1. Louisiana; 2. Resentment and Provocation; 3. Fatal Confrontations: The Leander Affair, and Chesapeake versus Leopard; 4. British Demands and Madison's Resistance; 5. On to Canada: War and Reality; 6. The Eagle against the Leviathan; 7. Finally a General, or Two; 8. War and Deception; 9. The Grand Offensive; 10. The Final Attack; Epilogue; Appendix: War Secretary Lord Bathurst's Letter to Major General Pakenham, October 24, 1814; Notes; Bibliography

IndexA; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y

Perhaps no conflict in American history is more important yet more overlooked and misunderstood than the War of 1812. Begun by President James Madison after decades of humiliating British trade interference and impressment of American sailors, the war in many ways was the second battle for United States independence.At the climax of the war-inspired by the defeat of Napoleon in early 1814 and the perceived illegality of the Louisiana Purchase-the British devised a plan to launch a three-pronged attack against the northern, eastern, and southern U.S. borders. Concealing preparations for this strike by engaging in negotiations in Ghent, Britain meanwhile secretly issued orders to seize New Orleans and wrest control of the Mississippi and the lands west of the river. They further instructed British commander General Edward Pakenham not to cease his attack if he heard rumors of a peace treaty. Great Britain even covertly installed government officials within military units with the intention of immediately taking over administrative control once the territory was conquered.According to author Ronald J. Drez, the British strategy and the successful defense of New Orleans through the leadership of General Andrew Jackson affirm the serious implications of this climatic -battle. Far from being simply an unnecessary epilogue to the War of 1812, the Battle of New Orleans firmly secured for the United States the territory acquired through the Louisiana Purchase.Through the use of primary sources, Drez provides a deeper understanding of Britain''s objectives, and The War of 1812, Conflict and Deception offers a compelling account of this pivotal moment in American history.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Ronald J. Drez, an award-winning author and former U.S. Marine Captain, served as the Assistant Director and Research Associate to Dr. Stephen E. Ambrose at the Eisenhower Center, and to Dr. Douglas Brinkley at the University of New Orleans for twenty years. Drez is the principal historian and president of Stephen Ambrose Tours, Inc.</p>

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