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LBJ and Grassroots Federalism : Congressman Bob Poage, Race, and Change in Texas

By: Duke, Robert H.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Centennial Series of the Association of Former Students, Texas A&M University: Publisher: College Station : Texas A&M University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (266 p.).ISBN: 9781623491857.Subject(s): Central-local government relations -- United States -- History -- 20th century -- Case studies | Economic assistance, Domestic -- Texas -- History -- 20th century | Federal aid to community development -- Texas -- Waco -- History -- 20th century | Federal aid to water resources development -- Texas -- History -- 20th century | Federal government -- United States -- History -- 20th century -- Case studies | Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973 | Mexican-Americans -- Texas -- Politics and government -- 20th century | Poage, W. R. (William Robert), 1899-1987 | Texas -- Ethnic relations -- History -- 20th century | Texas -- Politics and government -- 1865-1950 | Texas -- Politics and government -- 1951- | United States. National Youth Administration in Texas -- History | Waco (Tex.) -- Politics and government -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: LBJ and Grassroots Federalism : Congressman Bob Poage, Race, and Change in TexasDDC classification: 320.609764 | 320.609764284 LOC classification: JK325 .D85 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. The Texas They Knew; 2. The National Youth Administration, the State Director, and the State Senator; 3. Flood Control, Federalism, and a Ford Dealer; 4. Beyond Sandtown; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; Back Cover
Summary: LBJ and Grassroots Federalism: Congressman Bob Poage, Race, and Change in Texas reveals the local ramifications of federal policy. Three case studies in the rising career of Lyndon B. Johnson show this in action: LBJ''s formative experience as a New Dealer directing the National Youth Administration (NYA) in Texas; his key role as senate majority leader in breaking the deadlock to secure funds for the Lake Waco dam project; and the cumulative effect of his Great Society policies on urban renewal and educational reform among the Mexican American community in Waco.In each of these initiatives, Bob Poage-though far more politically conservative than Johnson-served as a conduit between LBJ and citizen activists in Poage's congressional district, affirming the significance of grassroots engagement even during an era usually associated with centralization.Robert Harold Duke''s careful analysis in LBJ and Grassroots Federalism also offers a unique insight into a transformational period when the federal government broke down barriers and opened doors to the engagement of African Americans and Mexican Americans in community planning processes and social policy.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JK325 .D85 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1769079 Available EBL1769079

Front Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. The Texas They Knew; 2. The National Youth Administration, the State Director, and the State Senator; 3. Flood Control, Federalism, and a Ford Dealer; 4. Beyond Sandtown; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; Back Cover

LBJ and Grassroots Federalism: Congressman Bob Poage, Race, and Change in Texas reveals the local ramifications of federal policy. Three case studies in the rising career of Lyndon B. Johnson show this in action: LBJ''s formative experience as a New Dealer directing the National Youth Administration (NYA) in Texas; his key role as senate majority leader in breaking the deadlock to secure funds for the Lake Waco dam project; and the cumulative effect of his Great Society policies on urban renewal and educational reform among the Mexican American community in Waco.In each of these initiatives, Bob Poage-though far more politically conservative than Johnson-served as a conduit between LBJ and citizen activists in Poage's congressional district, affirming the significance of grassroots engagement even during an era usually associated with centralization.Robert Harold Duke''s careful analysis in LBJ and Grassroots Federalism also offers a unique insight into a transformational period when the federal government broke down barriers and opened doors to the engagement of African Americans and Mexican Americans in community planning processes and social policy.

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