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The Americans Are Coming! : Dreams of African American Liberation in Segregationist South Africa

By: Vinson, Robert Trent.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.New African Histories: Publisher: Athens, OH : Ohio University Press, 2012Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (252 p.).ISBN: 9780821444054.Subject(s): African Americans -- Relations with Africans | Black nationalism -- South Africa | Blacks -- South Africa -- Attitudes | Garvey, Marcus, 1887-1940 -- Influence | United States -- Foreign public opinion, South African | Universal Negro Improvement AssociationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Americans Are Coming! : Dreams of African American Liberation in Segregationist South AfricaDDC classification: 320.5460968 LOC classification: DT1756 .V56 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
List of Illustrations; Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction: The Americans Are Coming!; Part I: Providential Design; Chapter 1: American Negroes as Racial Models; Chapter 2: The Failed Dream of British Liberation and Christian Regeneration; Part II: American Apocalypse; Chapter 3: The Rise of Marcus Garveyand His Gospel of Garveyismin Southern Africa; Chapter 4: Transnational Martyrdom and the Spread of Garveyismin South Africa; Chapter 5: "Charlatan or Savior?"; Chapter 6: A Dream Deferred; Essay on Sources and Methodology; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: For more than half a century before World War II, black South Africans and "American Negroes"-a group that included African Americans and black West Indians-established close institutional and personal relationships that laid the necessary groundwork for the successful South African and American antiapartheid movements. Though African Americans suffered under Jim Crow racial discrimination, oppressed Africans saw African Americans as free people who had risen from slavery to success and were role models and potential liberators. Many African Americans, regarded initially by the South African government as "honorary whites" exempt from segregation, also saw their activities in South Africa as a divinely ordained mission to establish "Africa for Africans," liberated from European empires. The Jamaican-born Marcus Garvey's Universal Negro Improvement Association, the largest black-led movement with two million members and supporters in forty-three countries at its height in the early 1920s, was the most anticipated source of liberation. Though these liberation prophecies went unfulfilled, black South Africans continued to view African Americans as inspirational models and as critical partners in the global antiapartheid struggle. The Americans Are Coming! is a rare case study that places African history and American history in a global context and centers Africa in African Diaspora studies.
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DT1756 Neoliberal Apartheid : DT1756 Imagined liberation : DT1756 .M385 2011 | DT1756.M385 2011 Apartheid Vertigo : DT1756 .V56 2012 The Americans Are Coming! : DT1756 .W55 2015 Waste of a White Skin : DT1756 .W55 2015 Waste of a white skin : DT1757 Apartheid on a Black Isle :

List of Illustrations; Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction: The Americans Are Coming!; Part I: Providential Design; Chapter 1: American Negroes as Racial Models; Chapter 2: The Failed Dream of British Liberation and Christian Regeneration; Part II: American Apocalypse; Chapter 3: The Rise of Marcus Garveyand His Gospel of Garveyismin Southern Africa; Chapter 4: Transnational Martyrdom and the Spread of Garveyismin South Africa; Chapter 5: "Charlatan or Savior?"; Chapter 6: A Dream Deferred; Essay on Sources and Methodology; Notes; Bibliography; Index

For more than half a century before World War II, black South Africans and "American Negroes"-a group that included African Americans and black West Indians-established close institutional and personal relationships that laid the necessary groundwork for the successful South African and American antiapartheid movements. Though African Americans suffered under Jim Crow racial discrimination, oppressed Africans saw African Americans as free people who had risen from slavery to success and were role models and potential liberators. Many African Americans, regarded initially by the South African government as "honorary whites" exempt from segregation, also saw their activities in South Africa as a divinely ordained mission to establish "Africa for Africans," liberated from European empires. The Jamaican-born Marcus Garvey's Universal Negro Improvement Association, the largest black-led movement with two million members and supporters in forty-three countries at its height in the early 1920s, was the most anticipated source of liberation. Though these liberation prophecies went unfulfilled, black South Africans continued to view African Americans as inspirational models and as critical partners in the global antiapartheid struggle. The Americans Are Coming! is a rare case study that places African history and American history in a global context and centers Africa in African Diaspora studies.

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

Africans' rejection of the white creation and implementation of segregationist policies in South Africa began early. In their fight and search for divergent antiracial allies, they drew inspirations from both within and without. Vinson (College of William and Mary) captures how the policies and institutionalization of "transnational white supremacy" forged bonds of multifaceted relationships between South Africans, American blacks, and West Indians. Divided into two parts--"Providential Design" and "American Apocalypse"--and focusing on 1890-1940, the book argues that African Americans' immediate post-Civil War gains in multiple areas inspired South Africans to welcome them as role models and liberators, and one of the liberation ideologies South Africans adopted as agents of change was Garveyism. Vinson stresses that though Garveyism germinated in the US, its broad tenets found fertile ground in South Africa, where it contributed various aspects, and where South Africans exploited it in numerous ways to fight racism. Ironically, while on the one hand, Garveyism's thrust directly generated an intensification of segregationist policies and South African blacks' dreams remained dreams, on the other hand, it indirectly sowed the seeds of a global antiracist movement and the eventual overthrow of apartheid. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. Z. N. Nchinda University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Milwaukee Area Technical College

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