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Transforming Civil War Prisons : Lincoln, Lieber, and the Politics of Captivity

By: Springer, Paul J.
Contributor(s): Robins, Glenn.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Critical Moments in American History: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (199 p.).ISBN: 9781135053307.Subject(s): Lieber, Francis, 1800-1872 | Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 | Military ethics | Military prisons -- Confederate States of America -- History | Military prisons -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Prisoners of war -- Confederate States of America -- History | Prisoners of war -- United States -- History -- 19th century | War -- Moral and ethical aspectsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Transforming Civil War Prisons : Lincoln, Lieber, and the Politics of CaptivityDDC classification: 973.77 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; Series Introduction; List of Figures; Acknowledgments; Timeline; 1 Prisoner of War Policy and Practice; 2 The Captivity Experience; 3 The Culture of Captivity; 4 The Politics of Captivity; 5 Honoring Civil War Captives; 6 Civil War Prisons in History and Memory; Documents; Bibliography; Index
Summary: During the Civil War, 410,000 people were held as prisoners of war on both sides. With resources strained by the unprecedented number of prisoners, conditions in overcrowded prison camps were dismal, and the death toll across Confederate and Union prisons reached 56,000 by the end of the war. In an attempt to improve prison conditions, President Lincoln issued General Orders 100, which would become the basis for future attempts to define the rights of prisoners, including the Geneva conventions. Meanwhile, stories of horrific prison experiences fueled political agendas on both sides, and would define the memory of the war, as each region worked aggressively to defend its prison record and to honor its own POWs.Robins and Springer examine the experience, culture, and politics of captivity, including war crimes, disease, and the use of former prison sites as locations of historical memory. Transforming Civil War Prisons introduces students to an underappreciated yet crucial aspect of waging war and shows how the legacy of Civil War prisons remains with us today.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E615 .S67 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1779182 Available EBL1779182

Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; Series Introduction; List of Figures; Acknowledgments; Timeline; 1 Prisoner of War Policy and Practice; 2 The Captivity Experience; 3 The Culture of Captivity; 4 The Politics of Captivity; 5 Honoring Civil War Captives; 6 Civil War Prisons in History and Memory; Documents; Bibliography; Index

During the Civil War, 410,000 people were held as prisoners of war on both sides. With resources strained by the unprecedented number of prisoners, conditions in overcrowded prison camps were dismal, and the death toll across Confederate and Union prisons reached 56,000 by the end of the war. In an attempt to improve prison conditions, President Lincoln issued General Orders 100, which would become the basis for future attempts to define the rights of prisoners, including the Geneva conventions. Meanwhile, stories of horrific prison experiences fueled political agendas on both sides, and would define the memory of the war, as each region worked aggressively to defend its prison record and to honor its own POWs.Robins and Springer examine the experience, culture, and politics of captivity, including war crimes, disease, and the use of former prison sites as locations of historical memory. Transforming Civil War Prisons introduces students to an underappreciated yet crucial aspect of waging war and shows how the legacy of Civil War prisons remains with us today.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Paul J. Springer is Associate Professor of Comparative Military Studies at Air Command and Staff College. He is the author of America's Captives: The History of US Prisoner of War Policy.</p> <p>Glenn Robins is Professor of History at Georgia Southwestern State University. He is the editor of They Have Left Us Here to Die: The Civil War POW Diary of Sgt. Lyle G. Adair, 111th US Colored Infantry.</p>

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