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Occupied Women : Gender, Military Occupation, and the American Civil War

By: Whites, LeeAnn.
Contributor(s): Long, Alecia P.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (265 p.).ISBN: 9780807143940.Subject(s): Military occupation -- Social aspects -- Confederate States of America | Occupations -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Sex role -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Social aspects | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Women | Women -- Employment -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Women -- Southern States -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Women and war -- United States -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Occupied Women : Gender, Military Occupation, and the American Civil WarDDC classification: 973.71082 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Introduction; I: GENDER RELATIONS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF UNION MILITARY POLICY; (Mis)Remembering General Order No. 28: Benjamin Butler, the Woman Order, and Historical Memory; Bedrooms as Battlefields: The Role of Gender Politics in Sherman's March; "Physical Abuse . . . and Rough Handling": Race, Gender, and Sexual Justice in the Occupied South; II: OCCUPIED WOMEN AND THE WAR AT HOME; Gettysburg Out of Bounds: Women and Soldiers in the Embattled Borough, 1863; "She-Rebels" on the Supply Line: Gender Conventions in Civil War Kentucky
"Corresponding with the Enemy": Mobilizing the Relational Field of Battle in St. LouisThe Practical Ladies of Occupied Natchez; III: OCCUPATIONS WITHIN OCCUPATION: RACE, CLASS , AND CULTURE; Between Slavery and Freedom: African American Women and Occupation in the Slave South; Occupied at Home: Women Confront Confederate Forces in North Carolina's Quaker Belt; Widow in a Swamp: Gender, Unionism, and Literacy in the Occupied South during the Civil War; Epilogue: The Fortieth Congress, Southern Women, and the Gender Politics of Postwar Occupation; Notes; Notes on Contributors; Index; A; B; C; D
EF; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W
Summary: In the spring of 1861, tens of thousands of young men formed military companies and offered to fight for their country. Near the end of the Civil War, nearly half of the adult male population of the North and a staggering 90 percent of eligible white males in the South had joined the military. With their husbands, sons, and fathers away, legions of women took on additional duties formerly handled by males, and many also faced the ordeal of having their homes occupied by enemy troops. With occupation, the home front and the battlefield merged to create an unanticipated second front where civilians-mainly women-resisted what they perceived as unjust domination. In Occupied Women, twelve distinguished historians consider how women's reactions to occupation affected both the strategies of military leaders and ultimately even the outcome of the Civil War.Alecia P. Long, Lisa Tendrich Frank, E. Susan Barber, and Charles F. Ritter explore occupation as an incubator of military policies that reflected occupied women's activism. Margaret Creighton, Kristen L. Streater, LeeAnn Whites, and Cita Cook examine specific locations where citizens both enforced and evaded these military policies. Leslie A. Schwalm, Victoria E. Bynum, and Joan E. Cashin look at the occupation as part of complex and overlapping differences in race, class, and culture. An epilogue by Judith Giesberg emphasizes these themes. Some essays reinterpret legendary encounters between military men and occupied women, such as those prompted by General Butler's infamous "Woman Order" and Sherman's March to the Sea. Others explore new areas such as the development of military policy with regard to sexual justice. Throughout, the contributors examine the common experiences of occupied women and address the unique situations faced by women, whether Union, Confederate, or freed.  Civil War historians have traditionally depicted Confederate women as rendered inert by occupying armies, but these essays demonstrate that women came together to form a strong, localized resistance to military invasion. Guerrilla activity, for example, occurred with the support and active participation of women on the home front. Women ran the domestic supply line of food, shelter, and information that proved critical to guerrilla tactics.  By broadening the discussion of the Civil War to include what LeeAnn Whites calls the "relational field of battle," this pioneering collection helps reconfigure the location of conflict and the chronology of the American Civil War.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E628 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1793061 Available EBL1793061

Cover; Contents; Introduction; I: GENDER RELATIONS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF UNION MILITARY POLICY; (Mis)Remembering General Order No. 28: Benjamin Butler, the Woman Order, and Historical Memory; Bedrooms as Battlefields: The Role of Gender Politics in Sherman's March; "Physical Abuse . . . and Rough Handling": Race, Gender, and Sexual Justice in the Occupied South; II: OCCUPIED WOMEN AND THE WAR AT HOME; Gettysburg Out of Bounds: Women and Soldiers in the Embattled Borough, 1863; "She-Rebels" on the Supply Line: Gender Conventions in Civil War Kentucky

"Corresponding with the Enemy": Mobilizing the Relational Field of Battle in St. LouisThe Practical Ladies of Occupied Natchez; III: OCCUPATIONS WITHIN OCCUPATION: RACE, CLASS , AND CULTURE; Between Slavery and Freedom: African American Women and Occupation in the Slave South; Occupied at Home: Women Confront Confederate Forces in North Carolina's Quaker Belt; Widow in a Swamp: Gender, Unionism, and Literacy in the Occupied South during the Civil War; Epilogue: The Fortieth Congress, Southern Women, and the Gender Politics of Postwar Occupation; Notes; Notes on Contributors; Index; A; B; C; D

EF; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W

In the spring of 1861, tens of thousands of young men formed military companies and offered to fight for their country. Near the end of the Civil War, nearly half of the adult male population of the North and a staggering 90 percent of eligible white males in the South had joined the military. With their husbands, sons, and fathers away, legions of women took on additional duties formerly handled by males, and many also faced the ordeal of having their homes occupied by enemy troops. With occupation, the home front and the battlefield merged to create an unanticipated second front where civilians-mainly women-resisted what they perceived as unjust domination. In Occupied Women, twelve distinguished historians consider how women's reactions to occupation affected both the strategies of military leaders and ultimately even the outcome of the Civil War.Alecia P. Long, Lisa Tendrich Frank, E. Susan Barber, and Charles F. Ritter explore occupation as an incubator of military policies that reflected occupied women's activism. Margaret Creighton, Kristen L. Streater, LeeAnn Whites, and Cita Cook examine specific locations where citizens both enforced and evaded these military policies. Leslie A. Schwalm, Victoria E. Bynum, and Joan E. Cashin look at the occupation as part of complex and overlapping differences in race, class, and culture. An epilogue by Judith Giesberg emphasizes these themes. Some essays reinterpret legendary encounters between military men and occupied women, such as those prompted by General Butler's infamous "Woman Order" and Sherman's March to the Sea. Others explore new areas such as the development of military policy with regard to sexual justice. Throughout, the contributors examine the common experiences of occupied women and address the unique situations faced by women, whether Union, Confederate, or freed.  Civil War historians have traditionally depicted Confederate women as rendered inert by occupying armies, but these essays demonstrate that women came together to form a strong, localized resistance to military invasion. Guerrilla activity, for example, occurred with the support and active participation of women on the home front. Women ran the domestic supply line of food, shelter, and information that proved critical to guerrilla tactics.  By broadening the discussion of the Civil War to include what LeeAnn Whites calls the "relational field of battle," this pioneering collection helps reconfigure the location of conflict and the chronology of the American Civil War.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This collection of 11 essays by academics and independent scholars from across the US focuses on "the often unacknowledged" roles of women--black and white, Northern and Southern--during the Civil War. Stories of white Southern women predominate. Several of the contributors do not acknowledge that for women or civilians, life in a combat zone or under an occupying army is never easy. They write indignant treatises about the invasion of privacy and insults, although physical violence and death were seldom present. Given the guerilla wars that preceded the war and continued afterward, the level of abuse was modest. The essays on Southern women loyal to the Union, black women's experiences with both Union and Confederate armies, and graphic descriptions of civilian life near the Battle of Gettysburg provide useful, interesting information. Those on Butler and Sherman ignore impossible situations, such as spying or provisioning by Confederate women. Further, Sherman's march and Butler's laws have been the subject of many major histories. Ample evidence of socioeconomic class divisions within the Confederacy provides valuable information. The bibliographies are excellent. Summing Up: Recommended. Selective use for Civil War and women's history collections, undergraduate and up. N. J. Hervey Luther College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Alecia P. Long is an associate professor of history and director of the Listening to Louisiana Women Oral History Project at Louisiana State University. She is the author of The Great Southern Babylon: Sex, Race, and Respectability in New Orleans, 1865-1920, winner of the Julia Cherry Spruill Prize for the best book in southern women's history in 2005.</p> <p>LeeAnn Whites is a professor of history at the University of Missouri. She is the author of The Civil War as a Crisis in Gender and Gender Matters: Civil War, Reconstruction, and the Making of the New South and coeditor of Women in Missouri History: In Search of Power and Influence. Alecia P. Long is an assistant professor of history at Louisiana State University. She is the author of The Great Southern Babylon: Sex, Race, and Respectability in New Orleans, 1865-1920, winner of the Julia Cherry Spruill Prize for the best book in southern women's history in 2005.</p>

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