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Framed by gender : how gender inequality persists in the modern world / Cecilia L. Ridgeway.

By: Ridgeway, Cecilia L.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Oxford University Press, ©2011Description: viii, 233 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780199755783 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0199755787; 9780199755776 (cloth : alk. paper); 0199755779 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Sex role -- United States | Social interaction -- United States | Women -- Social conditions | Women -- Economic conditions | Equality -- United StatesDDC classification: 305.42 LOC classification: HQ1075.5.U6 | R54 2011Online resources: Table of contents
Contents:
The puzzle of persistence -- A primary frame for organizing social relations -- Cultural beliefs and the gendering of social relations -- Gendering at work -- Gender at home -- The persistence of inequality -- Implications for change.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HQ1075.5 .U6R54 2011 (Browse shelf) Checked out 05/08/2020 0000002059210

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The puzzle of persistence -- A primary frame for organizing social relations -- Cultural beliefs and the gendering of social relations -- Gendering at work -- Gender at home -- The persistence of inequality -- Implications for change.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Impeccably titled, this meticulous scholarship showcases the richness of social psychology. Despite expanding rationalization in organizations, behaviors altered by technical and social innovations, and increasing egalitarian intent in relationships, the goal of equality is colliding with gender's power to frame thought and action. Ridgeway (Stanford) attributes the persistence of inequality to a lag between conditions encouraging change and personal capacities to replace frames of hierarchy with frames of difference. Reviewing evidence, she considers how to resolve the lag in the social laboratories of workplace and home. Evidence of a more level playing field in biotechnology is not found in information technology, another innovative setting. Evidence on the rejection of hierarchical heterosexual conduct norms as domestic road maps is countered by proof of innovative unions that persist in favoring males. Egalitarianism can materialize as rational practice, but more commonly the lag allows a default organizational or relational blueprint to sustain male privilege, even in careers or relationships aspiring to escape the pattern. Ridgeway's conclusion offers added urgency to the twin mandates that work become more family friendly and men become more thoroughly involved in caretaking in order for persisting gender inequalities to be overcome. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. Zingraff James Madison University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Cecilia L. Ridgeway is the Lucie Stern, Professor of Social Sciences in the Department of Sociology at Stanford University.

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