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When everything changed : the amazing journey of American women from 1960 to the present / Gail Collins.

By: Collins, Gail.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : London : Back Bay ; Little, Brown, and Co. [distributor], 2010Edition: 1st Back Bay pbk. ed.Description: x, 475 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9780316014045 (pbk.); 0316014044 (pbk.); 9780316059541 (hc.); 0316059544 (hc.).Subject(s): Women -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Women -- United States -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Women -- United States -- Social life and customs -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 305.4097309045
Contents:
1960. Repudiating Rosie ; The way we lived ; Housework -- When everything changed. The ice cracks ; What happened? ; Civil rights ; The decline of the double standard ; Women's liberation -- Following through. Backlash ; "You're gonna make it after all" ; Work and children ; The 1980s : having it all ; The 1990s : settling for less? ; The new millennium ; Hillary and Sarah-- and Tahita
Summary: Chronicles the revolution of women's civil rights throughout the past half century, drawing on oral history and research in a variety of disciplines while celebrating Hillary Clinton's recent presidential campaign.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HQ1421 .C64 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002059905

Originally published: New York : Little, Brown and Co., 2009.

Includes reading group guide.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 414-456) and index.

1960. Repudiating Rosie ; The way we lived ; Housework -- When everything changed. The ice cracks ; What happened? ; Civil rights ; The decline of the double standard ; Women's liberation -- Following through. Backlash ; "You're gonna make it after all" ; Work and children ; The 1980s : having it all ; The 1990s : settling for less? ; The new millennium ; Hillary and Sarah-- and Tahita

Chronicles the revolution of women's civil rights throughout the past half century, drawing on oral history and research in a variety of disciplines while celebrating Hillary Clinton's recent presidential campaign.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In this follow-up to America's Women, New York Times op-ed columnist Collins chronicles 50 years of trials and triumphs for American women. She presents a balanced report of the events and ideologies that catalyzed a shift in women's roles and unflinchingly details without bias the aftermath of the sexual revolution and the fight for political and economic equality (e.g., the increased incidence of children born out of wedlock, no-fault divorces, and the necessity of balancing career and child rearing). Verdict While the subject matter is familiar, Collins's accessible writing and inclusion of firsthand accounts from well-known and ordinary women make this a standout effort. Highly recommended for history buffs and anyone for who thinks women as presidents, astronauts, and CEOs should be the norm rather than the exception.-Tamela Chambers, Chicago P.L. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

In this extremely readable account of the impact of feminism on women in the US over the past 50 years, New York Times columnist Collins details the seismic shift in gender relations since the day in 1960 when a secretary appeared in a New York City traffic courtroom to pay her boss's speeding ticket. The presiding judge publicly chastised the woman and told her husband, also present, to get his wife under control. Her offense? She was wearing slacks. Over the next 400-plus pages, Collins paints a vivid picture of the various achievements in expanding the rights of women in the US, rights that involved more than wardrobe choice. She fluidly weaves together the stories of women who led this effort, such as Bella Abzug and Gloria Steinem, with the voices of "ordinary" women who challenged the social, political, and economic limitations they faced within their personal relations and in workplaces and schools. Collins discusses the ferocious backlash, as well as what remains unchanged, such as the difficulties of juggling family and work. Still, it is the impressive expansion of women's rights since 1960 that Collins deftly recounts here. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General, public, and undergraduate libraries. K. B. Nutter SUNY Stony Brook

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Gail Collins was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1945. She received a B.A. in journalism from Marquette University and an M.A. in government from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. <p> She writes an op-ed column for The New York Times every Thursday and Saturday. She was also the first woman to hold the position of Editorial Page Editor at the Times, which she held from 2001 to 2007. <p> She has also written several books including America's Women: Four Hundred Years of Dolls, Drudges, Helpmates, and Heroines and When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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