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Racial blackness and the discontinuity of Western modernity / Lindon Barrett ; edited by Justin A. Joyce, Dwight A. McBride, and John Carlos Rowe.

By: Barrett, Lindon, 1961-2008.
Contributor(s): Joyce, Justin A | McBride, Dwight A | Rowe, John Carlos.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.New Black studies series: Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [2014]Description: 1 online resource (xviii, 236 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252095290; 0252095294.Subject(s): Racism -- Political aspects -- History | Racism -- Economic aspects -- History | Civilization, Western | Civilization, Modern | Imperialism -- Social aspects -- History | Capitalism -- Social aspects -- History | Slavery -- History | Violence -- Political aspects -- History | African Americans -- Race identity | Indigenous peoples -- Race identityGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Racial blackness and the discontinuity of Western modernityDDC classification: 305.896 Other classification: SOC001000 | LIT004040 | SOC031000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
1. The Conceptual Impossibility of Racial Blackness : History, the Commodity, and Diasporic Modernity -- 2. Making the Flesh Word : Binomial Being and Representational Presence -- 3. Captivity, Desire, Trade : The Forging of National Form -- 4. The Intimate Civic : The Disturbance of the Quotidian -- 5. Modernism and the Affects of Racial Blackness -- Epilogue / by Justin A. Joyce and Dwight A. McBride.
Scope and content: "Racial Blackness and the Discontinuity of Western Modernity is the unfinished manuscript of Lindon Barrett, who died tragically and unexpectedly in 2008. John Carlos Rowe has assembled the completed chapters, and provides an introduction that offers some background and context for the writings. The project offers a genealogy of how the development of racial blackness within the mercantile capitalist system of Euro-American colonial imperialism was constitutive of Western modernity. Barrett explores the complex transnational systems of economic transactions and political exchanges foundational to the formation of modern subjectivities. In particular, he traces the embodied and significatory violence involved in the development of modern nations, and characterizes that time of nation-building as one which created unprecedented individual and communal detachments, facilitating the exclusion of racialized subjects from modern understandings of what it means to be human, or a subject. Ranging from an analysis of the mass commodity markets that were created by colonial economic expansion and which relied on the decimation of populations of indigenous people unsuitable for exploitation as well as the transport and sale of enslaved African workers, to literacy and the autobiography The Interesting Life of Olaudah Equiano or Gustavus Vassa, The African, Written by Himself, to later legal and literary texts, the work masterfully connects historical systems of racial slavery to postenlightenment modernity, and will be pathbreaking in a number of fields"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HT1523 .B37 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt3fh5tx Available ocn884725863

"Racial Blackness and the Discontinuity of Western Modernity is the unfinished manuscript of Lindon Barrett, who died tragically and unexpectedly in 2008. John Carlos Rowe has assembled the completed chapters, and provides an introduction that offers some background and context for the writings. The project offers a genealogy of how the development of racial blackness within the mercantile capitalist system of Euro-American colonial imperialism was constitutive of Western modernity. Barrett explores the complex transnational systems of economic transactions and political exchanges foundational to the formation of modern subjectivities. In particular, he traces the embodied and significatory violence involved in the development of modern nations, and characterizes that time of nation-building as one which created unprecedented individual and communal detachments, facilitating the exclusion of racialized subjects from modern understandings of what it means to be human, or a subject. Ranging from an analysis of the mass commodity markets that were created by colonial economic expansion and which relied on the decimation of populations of indigenous people unsuitable for exploitation as well as the transport and sale of enslaved African workers, to literacy and the autobiography The Interesting Life of Olaudah Equiano or Gustavus Vassa, The African, Written by Himself, to later legal and literary texts, the work masterfully connects historical systems of racial slavery to postenlightenment modernity, and will be pathbreaking in a number of fields"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 213-229) and index.

1. The Conceptual Impossibility of Racial Blackness : History, the Commodity, and Diasporic Modernity -- 2. Making the Flesh Word : Binomial Being and Representational Presence -- 3. Captivity, Desire, Trade : The Forging of National Form -- 4. The Intimate Civic : The Disturbance of the Quotidian -- 5. Modernism and the Affects of Racial Blackness -- Epilogue / by Justin A. Joyce and Dwight A. McBride.

Print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Lindon Barrett (1961-2008) was a professor of English and African American studies at the University of California, Riverside and the University of California, Irvine. He was the author of Blackness and Value: Seeing Double and the associate editor of the journal Callaloo from 1997-2000. Justin A. Joyce is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Northwestern University. Dwight McBride is Dean of the Graduate School and Associate Provost as well as the Daniel Hale Williams Professor of African American studies and English at Northwestern University. John Carlos Rowe is USC Associates' Professor of the Humanities and Professor of English and American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. <br>

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