Transnational discourses on class, gender, and cultural identity / Irene Marques.

By: Marques, Irene, 1969-Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksComparative cultural studies: Publisher: West Lafayette, Ind. : Purdue University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (xi, 208 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781612491646; 1612491642; 9781612491653; 1612491650; 1557536058; 9781557536051Subject(s): Political fiction -- History and criticism | Other (Philosophy) in literature | Identity (Psychology) in literature | Postcolonialism in literature | Language and languages in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Transnational discourses on class, gender, and cultural identity.DDC classification: 809.3/93581 LOC classification: PN3448.P6 | M37 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
pt. 1. The bolder politics of agency -- pt. 2. The deeper politics of agency.
Summary: "This exploration of class, feminism, and cultural identity (including issues of race, nation, colonialism, and economic imperialism) focuses on the work of four writers: the Mozambican Mia Couto, the Portuguese José Saramago, the Brazilian Clarice Lispector, and the South African J.M. Coetzee. In the first section, the author discusses the political aspects of Couto's collection of short stories Contos do nascer da terra (Stories of the Birth of the Land) and Saramago's novel O ano da morte de Ricardo Reis (The Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis). The second section explores similar themes in Coetzee's Life and Times of Michael K and Lispector's A hora da estrela (The Hour of the Star). Marques argues that these four writers are political in the sense that they bring to the forefront issues pertaining to the power of literature to represent, misrepresent, and debate matter related to different subaltern subjects: the postcolonial subject, the poor subject (the "poor other"), and the female subject. She also discusses the "ahuman other" in the context of the subjectivity of the natural world, the dead, and the unborn, and shows how these aspects are present in all the different societies addressed and point to the mystical dimension that permeates most societies. With regard to Couto's work, this "ahuman other" is approached mostly through a discussion of the holistic, animist values and epistemologies that inform and guide Mozambican traditional societies, while in further analyses the notion is approached via discussions on phenomenology, elementality, and divinity following the philosophies of Lévinas and Irigaray and mystical consciousness in Zen Buddhism and the psychology of Jung"-- Provided by publisher.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PN3448.P6 M37 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt6wq1q4 Available ocn787852071

Includes bibliographical references and index.

pt. 1. The bolder politics of agency -- pt. 2. The deeper politics of agency.

"This exploration of class, feminism, and cultural identity (including issues of race, nation, colonialism, and economic imperialism) focuses on the work of four writers: the Mozambican Mia Couto, the Portuguese José Saramago, the Brazilian Clarice Lispector, and the South African J.M. Coetzee. In the first section, the author discusses the political aspects of Couto's collection of short stories Contos do nascer da terra (Stories of the Birth of the Land) and Saramago's novel O ano da morte de Ricardo Reis (The Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis). The second section explores similar themes in Coetzee's Life and Times of Michael K and Lispector's A hora da estrela (The Hour of the Star). Marques argues that these four writers are political in the sense that they bring to the forefront issues pertaining to the power of literature to represent, misrepresent, and debate matter related to different subaltern subjects: the postcolonial subject, the poor subject (the "poor other"), and the female subject. She also discusses the "ahuman other" in the context of the subjectivity of the natural world, the dead, and the unborn, and shows how these aspects are present in all the different societies addressed and point to the mystical dimension that permeates most societies. With regard to Couto's work, this "ahuman other" is approached mostly through a discussion of the holistic, animist values and epistemologies that inform and guide Mozambican traditional societies, while in further analyses the notion is approached via discussions on phenomenology, elementality, and divinity following the philosophies of Lévinas and Irigaray and mystical consciousness in Zen Buddhism and the psychology of Jung"-- Provided by publisher.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Irene Marques teaches African and Caribbean literatures, comparative and world literature, literary theory, and writing and rhetoric at the Ontario College of Art and Design University. Marques's publications include the edited volume The Works of Chin Ce: A Critical Overview (2007), and numerous articles in journals including African Identities: Journal of Economics, Culture and Society, Research in African Literatures, and CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture. She also publishes works of fiction including the volumes Wearing Glasses of Water (poetry, 2007), Habitando na metáfora do tempo: Crónicas desejadas (short stories, 2009), The Perfect Unrevelling of the Spirit (prose poetry, 2012), and The Circular Incantation (prose poetry, 2013).

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