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The ovidian vogue : literary fashion and imitative practice in late Elizabethan England / Daniel D. Moss.

By: Moss, Daniel David, 1979- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Toronto : University of Toronto Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781442617476; 1442617470.Subject(s): Imitation in literature | English literature -- Roman influencesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Ovidian vogueDDC classification: 821/.309 LOC classification: PR549.N3 | M68 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: "Note how she quotes the leaves" -- 1 Impotence and Stillbirth: Nashe, Shakespeare, and the Ovidian Debut -- 2 Shadow and Corpus: The Shifting Figure of Ovid in Chapman's Early Poetry -- 3 Ovid in the Godless Poem: Allusive Rebellion in Edmund Spenser's Legend of Justice -- 4 The Post-Metamorphic Landscape in Drayton's Endimion and Phoebe and Englands Heroicall Epistles 119 5 The Brief Ovidian Career of John Donne -- Conclusion: "It sticks strangely, whatever it is."
Summary: "The Roman poet Ovid was one of the most-imitated classical writers of the Elizabethan age and a touchstone for generations of English writers. In The Ovidian Vogue, Daniel Moss argues that poets appropriated Ovid not just to connect with the ancient past but also to communicate and compete within late Elizabethan literary culture."
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR549.N3 M68 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt7zwcbg Available ocn891590982

Includes bibliographical references.

Print version record.

Introduction: "Note how she quotes the leaves" -- 1 Impotence and Stillbirth: Nashe, Shakespeare, and the Ovidian Debut -- 2 Shadow and Corpus: The Shifting Figure of Ovid in Chapman's Early Poetry -- 3 Ovid in the Godless Poem: Allusive Rebellion in Edmund Spenser's Legend of Justice -- 4 The Post-Metamorphic Landscape in Drayton's Endimion and Phoebe and Englands Heroicall Epistles 119 5 The Brief Ovidian Career of John Donne -- Conclusion: "It sticks strangely, whatever it is."

"The Roman poet Ovid was one of the most-imitated classical writers of the Elizabethan age and a touchstone for generations of English writers. In The Ovidian Vogue, Daniel Moss argues that poets appropriated Ovid not just to connect with the ancient past but also to communicate and compete within late Elizabethan literary culture."

Author notes provided by Syndetics

MossDaniel D.:<br> <p>Daniel Moss is an assistant professor in the Department of English at Southern Methodist University.<br></p>

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