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Regina Anderson Andrews, Harlem Renaissance librarian / Ethelene Whitmire.

By: Whitmire, Ethelene, 1968-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [2014]Description: 1 online resource (xi, 147 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252096419; 025209641X.Subject(s): Library directors -- United States -- Biography | African American women librarians -- United States -- Biography | Harlem Renaissance | African Americans -- New York (State) -- New York -- Intellectual life | Discrimination in employmentAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Regina Anderson Andrews, Harlem Renaissance librarianDDC classification: 025.1/97092 Other classification: SOC001000 | SOC028000 | BIO000000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Chicago : the beginning -- Normal, Illinois, Chicago, Wilberforce and Chicago Public Library -- Harlem Renaissance women and 580 St. Nicholas Avenue -- Marriage -- The Harlem Experimental Theatre -- The New York Public Library -- International flights -- Mahopac, New York : endings.
Summary: "The first African American to head a branch of the New York Public Library (NYPL), Regina Andrews led an extraordinary life. Allied with W.E.B. Du Bois, she fought for promotion and equal pay against entrenched sexism and racism. Andrews also played a key role in the Harlem Renaissance, supporting writers and intellectuals with dedicated workspace at her 135th Street Branch Library. After hours she cohosted a legendary salon that drew the likes of Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston. Her work as an actress and playwright helped established the Harlem Experimental Theater. Ethelene Whitmire's new biography offers the first full-length portrait of Andrews' activism, engagement with the arts of the Harlem Renaissance, and work with the NYPL"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
Z720.A63 W48 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt7zw61w Available ocn884725751

"The first African American to head a branch of the New York Public Library (NYPL), Regina Andrews led an extraordinary life. Allied with W.E.B. Du Bois, she fought for promotion and equal pay against entrenched sexism and racism. Andrews also played a key role in the Harlem Renaissance, supporting writers and intellectuals with dedicated workspace at her 135th Street Branch Library. After hours she cohosted a legendary salon that drew the likes of Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston. Her work as an actress and playwright helped established the Harlem Experimental Theater. Ethelene Whitmire's new biography offers the first full-length portrait of Andrews' activism, engagement with the arts of the Harlem Renaissance, and work with the NYPL"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Chicago : the beginning -- Normal, Illinois, Chicago, Wilberforce and Chicago Public Library -- Harlem Renaissance women and 580 St. Nicholas Avenue -- Marriage -- The Harlem Experimental Theatre -- The New York Public Library -- International flights -- Mahopac, New York : endings.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Whitmire (library and information studies, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison) has written the first biography of African American librarian Regina Anderson Andrews (1901-93), who worked during the 1920s at the New York Public Library's (NYPL) 135th Street Branch in Harlem. There, Andrews befriended many writers--Langston Hughes, for example; connected them with the library; and hosted salons with her roommates. The character Mary in Carl Van Vechten's controversial novel Nigger Heaven was largely based on Andrews at this time. She also helped found the Harlem Experimental Theatre, which rehearsed in the basement of the library, and wrote many one-act plays. Although -Andrews struggled for years to earn promotions, she eventually held the position of director of the -Washington Heights Branch, becoming the first African American to lead a library in the NYPL system. Andrews was a fascinating librarian, and this biography seems too short (perhaps Andrews' collection of papers could not provide a fuller portrait). -VERDICT Librarians, library school students, and fans of the Harlem Renaissance will enjoy this book, although they may wish for more context about the significant role of librarians in social and cultural movements.-Kate Stewart, American Folklife Ctr., Washington, DC (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Ethelene Whitmire is an associate professor of library and information studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.</p> <br>

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