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Revolutionizing Expectations : Women's Organizations, Feminism, and American Politics, 1965-1980

By: Blair, Melissa Estes.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Athens : University of Georgia Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (220 p.).ISBN: 9780820347868.Subject(s): Feminism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Women -- Political activity -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Women -- United States -- Societies and clubs -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Revolutionizing Expectations : Women's Organizations, Feminism, and American Politics, 1965-1980DDC classification: 305.420973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter One. Women's Grassroots Political Activism in the 1960s; Chapter Two. Race and Feminism in a Southern City: Durham, North Carolina; Chapter Three. Feminist Coalitions and the era: Indianapolis; Chapter Four. "Not by Tearing Down": Politics and Feminism in Denver; Chapter Five. Responses to Conservatism and the Evolution of Political Tactics; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: In the 1970s the women's movement created tremendous changes in the lives of women throughout the United States. Millions of women participated in a movement that fundamentally altered the country's ideas about how women could and should contribute to American society. Revolutionizing Expectations tells the story of some of those women, many of whom took part in the movement in unexpected ways. By looking at feminist activism in Durham, Denver, and Indianapolis, Melissa Estes Blair uncovers not only the workof local chapters but also the feminist activism of Leagues of Women Voters and of women's religious groups in those pivotal cities. Through her exploration of how women's organizations that were not explicitly feminist became channels for feminism, Blair expands our understanding of who feminists were and what feminist action looked like during the high tide of the women's movement. Revolutionizing Expectations looks beyond feminism's intellectual leaders and uncovers a multifaceted women's movement of white, African American, and Hispanic women from a range of political backgrounds and ages who worked together to bring about tremendous changes in their own lives and the lives of generations of women who followed them.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1236.5.U6 B562 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1813394 Available EBL1813394

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter One. Women's Grassroots Political Activism in the 1960s; Chapter Two. Race and Feminism in a Southern City: Durham, North Carolina; Chapter Three. Feminist Coalitions and the era: Indianapolis; Chapter Four. "Not by Tearing Down": Politics and Feminism in Denver; Chapter Five. Responses to Conservatism and the Evolution of Political Tactics; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

In the 1970s the women's movement created tremendous changes in the lives of women throughout the United States. Millions of women participated in a movement that fundamentally altered the country's ideas about how women could and should contribute to American society. Revolutionizing Expectations tells the story of some of those women, many of whom took part in the movement in unexpected ways. By looking at feminist activism in Durham, Denver, and Indianapolis, Melissa Estes Blair uncovers not only the workof local chapters but also the feminist activism of Leagues of Women Voters and of women's religious groups in those pivotal cities. Through her exploration of how women's organizations that were not explicitly feminist became channels for feminism, Blair expands our understanding of who feminists were and what feminist action looked like during the high tide of the women's movement. Revolutionizing Expectations looks beyond feminism's intellectual leaders and uncovers a multifaceted women's movement of white, African American, and Hispanic women from a range of political backgrounds and ages who worked together to bring about tremendous changes in their own lives and the lives of generations of women who followed them.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Blair (Warren Wilson College) does an excellent job of setting the feminist movement in its fuller context of other semi-allied women's organizational activities. Other organizations include the YWCA, the League of Women Voters, Church Women United, the National Council of Negro Women, and the National Council of Jewish Women. Blair compares three cities: Durham, NC; Denver, CO; and Indianapolis, IN, from 1965-1980. She rightly adjusts readers' understanding of women's organizations and movements from the national to the local, where women pushed lots of reforms in civil rights, anti-poverty programs, and public school activities. Blair's analysis is based not on insider perspectives but rather on interviews and primary sources in archives and other library collections. Her work provides convincing documentation of the ways women began to mainstream feminism and female participation in local and state politics, albeit in separate women's organizations, by advocating policy changes for multiple public policy issues. Blair may overstate the uniqueness of her contribution to the study of mainstream women's politics, as various political science studies have examined women in political parties, civil rights groups, and state legislatures, but her book is nevertheless pioneering and valuable. Comparable to Stephanie Gilmore's Groundswell (2012). Recommended for university libraries and women's professional associations. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Kathleen Staudt, University of Texas at El Paso

Author notes provided by Syndetics

MELISSA ESTES BLAIR is assistant professor of history and political science at Warren Wilson College.

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