Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Colonial Survey and Native Landscapes in Rural South Africa, 1850 - 1913 : The Politics of Divided Space in the Cape and Transvaal

By: Braun, Lindsay F.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.African Social Studies Series: Publisher: Leiden : BRILL, 2014Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (426 p.).ISBN: 9789004282292.Subject(s): Blacks -- Land tenure -- South Africa | Land tenure -- South Africa | Real property -- South Africa | South Africa -- Politics and government -- 1836-1909 | South Africa -- Politics and government -- 1909-1948Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Colonial Survey and Native Landscapes in Rural South Africa, 1850 - 1913 : The Politics of Divided Space in the Cape and TransvaalDDC classification: 333.3096809034 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Colonial Survey and Native Landscapes in Rural South Africa, 1850-1913: The Politics of Divided Space in the Cape and Transvaal; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgements; Notes on Terminology and Usage; List of Illustrations; List of Abbreviations; 1 Introduction: The Construction of Colonial Terrritory; PART 1: Imagining Lands without Chiefs; 2 Redefining Land and Location in the Eastern Cape; 3 "Cut Into Little Bits": Engineering Social Order; 4 Survey and Mediation in Fingoland; PART 2: Locating the Enduring Kingdom; 5 The Notional Republic; 6 "Before, the Entire Land Was Ramabulana"
7 The Fall and Rise of Mphephu8 Objections and Objectives: SANAC, the Tsewu Case, and the Land Act; Bibliography; Index
Summary: In Colonial Survey and Native Landscapes in Rural South Africa, 1850 - 1913, Lindsay Frederick Braun explores the technical processes and struggles surrounding the creation and maintenance of boundaries and spaces in South Africa in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DT1760 .B73 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1823622 Available EBL1823622

Colonial Survey and Native Landscapes in Rural South Africa, 1850-1913: The Politics of Divided Space in the Cape and Transvaal; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgements; Notes on Terminology and Usage; List of Illustrations; List of Abbreviations; 1 Introduction: The Construction of Colonial Terrritory; PART 1: Imagining Lands without Chiefs; 2 Redefining Land and Location in the Eastern Cape; 3 "Cut Into Little Bits": Engineering Social Order; 4 Survey and Mediation in Fingoland; PART 2: Locating the Enduring Kingdom; 5 The Notional Republic; 6 "Before, the Entire Land Was Ramabulana"

7 The Fall and Rise of Mphephu8 Objections and Objectives: SANAC, the Tsewu Case, and the Land Act; Bibliography; Index

In Colonial Survey and Native Landscapes in Rural South Africa, 1850 - 1913, Lindsay Frederick Braun explores the technical processes and struggles surrounding the creation and maintenance of boundaries and spaces in South Africa in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Braun (Univ. of Oregon) examines the role of surveyors and cartographers in remaking the landscape of rural South Africa between the 1850s and the Natives Land Act (1913). Analyzing the complex and multivalent lenses through which Africans understood, responded to, and resisted these imagined and physical alterations to the landscape, Braun seeks to recover the participation of Africans in these processes without reducing or simplifying their motivations and worldviews to "communalism." By situating his work around two case studies, the Kei River valley (the Eastern Cape and "Fingoland") and the Venda Kingdom of the Transvaal, Braun demonstrates that the colonial fantasy represented by lines on a map was made real only through processes of negotiation, conflict, and adaptation. Braun examines the relationship between land surveys, dispossession, and imposition of individual land tenure on the people of the Kei, most notably through the Glen Grey Act of 1894. On the other hand, he explores the ways in which the Venda King Ramabulana used the opportunity of Boer defeat in the South African War to restore some of his authority and sovereignty. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and scholars interested in colonial land regimes. --Charles V. Reed, Elizabeth City State University

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.