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Change They Can't Believe In : The Tea Party and Reactionary Politics in America

By: Parker, Christopher S.
Contributor(s): Barreto, Matt A.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (395 p.).ISBN: 9781400846023.Subject(s): Government, Resistance to -- United States -- History -- 21st century | Political participation -- United States -- History -- 21st century | Tea Party movementGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Change They Can't Believe In : The Tea Party and Reactionary Politics in AmericaDDC classification: 322.440973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; CONTENTS; List of Figures and Tables; Preface and Acknowledgments; INTRODUCTION Who Is the Tea Party and What Do They Want?; 1 Toward a Theory of the Tea Party; 2 Who Likes Tea? SOURCES OF SUPPORT FOR THE TEA PARTY; 3 Exploring the Tea Party's Commitment to Freedom and Patriotism; 4 Does the Tea Party Really Want Their Country Back?; 5 The Tea Party and Obamaphobia IS THE HOSTILITY REAL OR IMAGINED?; 6 Can You Hear Us Now? WHY REPUBLICANS ARE LISTENING TO THE TEA PARTY; CONCLUSION; Afterword to the Paperback Edition; Appendix; Notes; Index
Summary: Are Tea Party supporters merely a group of conservative citizens concerned about government spending? Or are they racists who refuse to accept Barack Obama as their president because he's not white? Change They Can't Believe In offers an alternative argument-that the Tea Party is driven by the reemergence of a reactionary movement in American politics that is fueled by a fear that America has changed for the worse. Providing a range of original evidence and rich portraits of party sympathizers as well as activists, Christopher Parker and Matt Barreto show that the perception that America is i
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Cover; Title; Copyright; CONTENTS; List of Figures and Tables; Preface and Acknowledgments; INTRODUCTION Who Is the Tea Party and What Do They Want?; 1 Toward a Theory of the Tea Party; 2 Who Likes Tea? SOURCES OF SUPPORT FOR THE TEA PARTY; 3 Exploring the Tea Party's Commitment to Freedom and Patriotism; 4 Does the Tea Party Really Want Their Country Back?; 5 The Tea Party and Obamaphobia IS THE HOSTILITY REAL OR IMAGINED?; 6 Can You Hear Us Now? WHY REPUBLICANS ARE LISTENING TO THE TEA PARTY; CONCLUSION; Afterword to the Paperback Edition; Appendix; Notes; Index

Are Tea Party supporters merely a group of conservative citizens concerned about government spending? Or are they racists who refuse to accept Barack Obama as their president because he's not white? Change They Can't Believe In offers an alternative argument-that the Tea Party is driven by the reemergence of a reactionary movement in American politics that is fueled by a fear that America has changed for the worse. Providing a range of original evidence and rich portraits of party sympathizers as well as activists, Christopher Parker and Matt Barreto show that the perception that America is i

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Parker (social justice and political science, Univ. of Washington, Seattle; Fighting for Democracy) and Barreto (political science, Univ. of Washington, Seattle; Ethnic Cues) posit that Tea Party supporters are more prone to racism, less supportive of civil liberties, and well to the right of mainstream conservatives, feeling their country is "slipping away" and finding a focus for their discontent in the Obama presidency. The authors draw these not entirely surprising conclusions mainly from research encompassing over 2,500 telephone interviews based on scientific sampling. The authors further believe that Tea Party supporters are "reactionary conservatives" who aim to resist change in a way similar to right-wing movements of the past such as the Ku Klux Klan and the John Birch Society, an argument, they believe, more vulnerable than those made based on polling results. -VERDICT Parker and Barreto are political scientists who have rigorously documented their Tea Party polling to the point that while specialist readers will value their research, most others will tire of the argument and are more likely to engage with a book such as Theda Skocpol and Vanessa Williamson's The Tea Party and the Remaking of Republican Conservatism.--Robert Nardini, Niagara Falls, NY (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

In Change They Can't Believe In, Parker and Barreto (both, Univ. of Washington) examine the emergence of the Tea Party in the wake of the Obama presidency. Toward this end, they seek to develop a theory of the Tea Party taking into account whether and how the Tea Party differs from previous conservative movements. They investigate not only people who identify with the Tea Party, but also those who sympathize with the Tea Party. They find that relative to past conservative movements, the Tea Party movement is most closely aligned with reactionary conservatism. Members and supporters exhibit higher levels of paranoia and anxiety about government activities than do mainstream conservatives. Not surprisingly, concern over the presidency of Barack Obama is a flash point among those who support the Tea Party. Because the authors focus not only on Tea Party members but on sympathizers, they argue that their examination provides a much more complete picture of the effects the Tea Party movement has had upon the US political system. In addition to marshaling a great deal of original data, the authors capably place the Tea Party movement in a historical context. Summing Up: Recommended. Undergraduate, graduate, and research collections. R. M. Alexander Ohio Northern University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Christopher S. Parker is the Stuart A. Scheingold Professor of Social Justice and Political Science at the University of Washington, Seattle. He is the author of "Fighting for Democracy" (Princeton). Matt A. Barreto is associate professor of political science at the University of Washington, Seattle, and director of the Washington Institute for the Study of Ethnicity, Race and Sexuality. He is the author of "Ethnic Cues".

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