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Freedom and Criminal Responsibility in American Legal Thought.

By: Green, Thomas Andrew.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Cambridge University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (520 p.).ISBN: 9781316077030.Subject(s): Criminal liability -- United States | Freedom | HISTORY / United States / 20th Century | Law -- PhilosophyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Freedom and Criminal Responsibility in American Legal ThoughtDDC classification: 345.73/04 | 345.7304 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half-title; Epigraph; Title page; Copyright information; Dedication; Table of contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; The Free Will Problem and the Criminal Law; The Free Will Problem in Twentieth-Century American Criminal Law; Negotiating Determinism and Conventional Morality: The Jury, the Insanity Defense...; The Free Will Problem and the Scope of This Book; Part I: Freedom and Criminal Responsibility in the Age of Pound; 1 Prologue; The Fin de Siècle; The New Century: Gino Speranza; The New Science and "Incorrigibles"; Free Will and the Jury; 2 The Progressive Era: Pound
The Progressive EraThe AICLC and the 1909 Rapprochement; Private Law and Pound; Pound's Early Criminal Law Scholarship: 1905-1915; Pound's Future of the Criminal Law: 1916-1921; Criminal Justice Today: Pound in the Early 1920s; Conclusion: Pound Unresolved; 3 Pound Eclipsed?; Introduction; William A. White; S. Sheldon Glueck; John H. Wigmore and the Ongoing Conversation of the 1920s; Conclusion; Part II: Conventional Morality and the Rule of Law; 4 Scientific-Positivism, Utilitarianism, and the Wages of Conventional Morality: 1930-1937; Introduction; Scientific-Positivism
The Behavioral Science Critique of Free WillPositivist-Leaning Jurisprudence; Social Passions and the Rule of Law; Raymond Moley; Francis Sayre; Jerome Hall; John B. Waite; Alfred Gausewitz; The Utilitarian Reaction: Jerome Michael and Herbert Wechsler; Conclusion; 5 Entr'acte; Introduction; Traditionalism Redux: Jerome Hall and Thurman Arnold; Jerome Hall; Thurman Arnold; Positivism and the Consciousness of Freedom: Robert Knight; Existential Perspectives: Sir Walter Moberly and Wilber Katz; Sir Walter Moberly; Wilber Katz; Conclusion
6 Durham v. United States, the Moral Context of the Criminal Law, and...Introduction; The Insanity Defense and DURHAM; Legal Insanity; Durham v. United States, David Bazelon, C.J.; Divergence and Convergence; The Limits of Utilitarian Compromise: Herbert Wechsler and the Model Penal Code; The Voice of Traditionalism: Jerome Hall; The Vicissitudes of Positivism: Warren Hill and Thurman Arnold; Wilber Katz; Thomas Szasz; Convergence Triumphant: Henry Hart; Conclusion; Part III: Freedom, Criminal Responsibility, and Retributivism in Late-Twentieth-Century Legal Thought
7 The Foundations of Neo-Retributivism: 1957-1976Introduction; Herbert Hart and the American Criminal Jurisprudence of the 1960s; A Critique: Francis Allen; A New Initiative: Herbert Hart; Hart, Wootton, and the Fate of Judgment without Blame; Sixties American Criminal Jurisprudence: Packer, Kadish, and Goldstein; Herbert Packer; Sanford Kadish; Abraham Goldstein; Herbert Morris: Retributivism Revived; Crossroads: The Early 1970s; Doing Justice and the Decline of the Rehabilitative Ideal; The Capacity to Conform: David Bazelon and Stephen Morse; Conclusion
8 Rethinking the Freedom Question: 1978-1994
Summary: This book deals with the most fundamental problem in criminal law, the way in which free will and determinism relate to criminal responsibility.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF9235 .G74 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1754872 Available EBL1754872

Cover; Half-title; Epigraph; Title page; Copyright information; Dedication; Table of contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; The Free Will Problem and the Criminal Law; The Free Will Problem in Twentieth-Century American Criminal Law; Negotiating Determinism and Conventional Morality: The Jury, the Insanity Defense...; The Free Will Problem and the Scope of This Book; Part I: Freedom and Criminal Responsibility in the Age of Pound; 1 Prologue; The Fin de Siècle; The New Century: Gino Speranza; The New Science and "Incorrigibles"; Free Will and the Jury; 2 The Progressive Era: Pound

The Progressive EraThe AICLC and the 1909 Rapprochement; Private Law and Pound; Pound's Early Criminal Law Scholarship: 1905-1915; Pound's Future of the Criminal Law: 1916-1921; Criminal Justice Today: Pound in the Early 1920s; Conclusion: Pound Unresolved; 3 Pound Eclipsed?; Introduction; William A. White; S. Sheldon Glueck; John H. Wigmore and the Ongoing Conversation of the 1920s; Conclusion; Part II: Conventional Morality and the Rule of Law; 4 Scientific-Positivism, Utilitarianism, and the Wages of Conventional Morality: 1930-1937; Introduction; Scientific-Positivism

The Behavioral Science Critique of Free WillPositivist-Leaning Jurisprudence; Social Passions and the Rule of Law; Raymond Moley; Francis Sayre; Jerome Hall; John B. Waite; Alfred Gausewitz; The Utilitarian Reaction: Jerome Michael and Herbert Wechsler; Conclusion; 5 Entr'acte; Introduction; Traditionalism Redux: Jerome Hall and Thurman Arnold; Jerome Hall; Thurman Arnold; Positivism and the Consciousness of Freedom: Robert Knight; Existential Perspectives: Sir Walter Moberly and Wilber Katz; Sir Walter Moberly; Wilber Katz; Conclusion

6 Durham v. United States, the Moral Context of the Criminal Law, and...Introduction; The Insanity Defense and DURHAM; Legal Insanity; Durham v. United States, David Bazelon, C.J.; Divergence and Convergence; The Limits of Utilitarian Compromise: Herbert Wechsler and the Model Penal Code; The Voice of Traditionalism: Jerome Hall; The Vicissitudes of Positivism: Warren Hill and Thurman Arnold; Wilber Katz; Thomas Szasz; Convergence Triumphant: Henry Hart; Conclusion; Part III: Freedom, Criminal Responsibility, and Retributivism in Late-Twentieth-Century Legal Thought

7 The Foundations of Neo-Retributivism: 1957-1976Introduction; Herbert Hart and the American Criminal Jurisprudence of the 1960s; A Critique: Francis Allen; A New Initiative: Herbert Hart; Hart, Wootton, and the Fate of Judgment without Blame; Sixties American Criminal Jurisprudence: Packer, Kadish, and Goldstein; Herbert Packer; Sanford Kadish; Abraham Goldstein; Herbert Morris: Retributivism Revived; Crossroads: The Early 1970s; Doing Justice and the Decline of the Rehabilitative Ideal; The Capacity to Conform: David Bazelon and Stephen Morse; Conclusion

8 Rethinking the Freedom Question: 1978-1994

This book deals with the most fundamental problem in criminal law, the way in which free will and determinism relate to criminal responsibility.

Description based upon print version of record.

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