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Digital Systems for Open Access to Formal and Informal Learning.

By: Sampson, Demetrios G.
Contributor(s): Ifenthaler, Dirk | Spector, J. Michael | Isaias, Pedro.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2014Description: 1 online resource (346 p.).ISBN: 9783319022642.Subject(s): Computer-assisted instruction -- Congresses | Education -- Data processing -- Congresses | Educational technology -- CongressesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Digital Systems for Open Access to Formal and Informal LearningDDC classification: 371.334 LOC classification: LB1028.43Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Acknowledgements; Contents; Contributors; Chapter 1; Digital Systems for Open Access to Formal and Informal Learning; 1 Digital Systems for Open Access to Formal and Informal Learning: An Overview; References; Part I ; Open Access to Formal and Informal Learning: Theory and Practice; Chapter 2; The Open Discovery Space Portal: A Socially-Powered and Open Federated Infrastructure ; 1 Introduction; 2 Requirements of the ODS Portal; 2.1 Terminology; 2.2 Users; 2.3 Functional Requirements; 2.4 Non-Functional Requirements; 3 Related Work; 4 The ODS Portal Architecture; 4.1 Overview
4.2 Components5 Implementation of the Ods Portal; 6 Conclusions and Future Work; References; Chapter 3; The Evolution of University Open Courses in Transforming Learning: Experiences from Mainland China; 1 The Evolution Route of University Open Courses in the Past 20 Years; 2 The Initiation of Open Educational Resources; 2.1 The Most Popular Project with Free Online Course Materials in Higher Education: MIT OpenCourseWare; 2.2 The Most Influential National Program to Promote Curriculum Quality through Open Course: National Pilot Curriculum in China
3 The Popularization of Lecture Video Clips Through Internet3.1 Illumination of Flipped Classes via Using Educational Video Clips: Khan Academy; 3.2 The Pool of Lecture Video Clips of Elite Universities: iTunes U; 3.3 The National Program of Lecture Video Clips: Quality Video Open Course in China; 4 The Prevalence of Massive Open Online Courses; 4.1 The Threshold of MOOCs in Elite Universities; 4.2 The Response to MOOCs from Chinese Industry; 5 The Implication of Open Courses in Transforming Learning; 5.1 The Framework for Watching Open Courses
5.2 The Coupling of Learning And Teaching Process In Open Courses5.3 The Positive Reaction to MOOCs from the Chinese Government; References; Chapter 4; Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and Massively Multiplayer Online Games (MMOGs): Synergies and Lessons to Be Learned; 1 Introduction; 2 MMOGs and MOOCs: Synergies; 3 Learning Processes, Practices, and Pedagogies; 4 Engagement and Immersion; 4.1 Networks, Groups, and Interactions; 4.2 Structure, Freedom, and Control; 4.3 Assessment of Learning; 5 Discussion and Conclusions; References; Chapter 5
Supporting Open Access to Teaching and Learning of People with Disabilities 1 Introduction; 2 Requirements of the Inclusive Learning Portal; 2.1 Terminology; 2.2 Users; 2.3 Functional Requirements; 2.4 Nonfunctional Requirements; 3 Related Work; 4 The Inclusive Learning Portal Architecture; 4.1 Overview; 4.2 Components; 5 Implementation of the Inclusive Learning Portal; 6 Conclusions; References; Chapter 6 ; Development of Visualization of Learning Outcomes Using Curriculum Mapping; 1 Background; 2 Outline of NBAS; 3 Visualization of Learning Outcomes
4 Examination of How Far it is Possible for Teachers on Major Programmes to Understand Learning Outcomes
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LB1028.43 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1782107 Available EBL1782107

Acknowledgements; Contents; Contributors; Chapter 1; Digital Systems for Open Access to Formal and Informal Learning; 1 Digital Systems for Open Access to Formal and Informal Learning: An Overview; References; Part I ; Open Access to Formal and Informal Learning: Theory and Practice; Chapter 2; The Open Discovery Space Portal: A Socially-Powered and Open Federated Infrastructure ; 1 Introduction; 2 Requirements of the ODS Portal; 2.1 Terminology; 2.2 Users; 2.3 Functional Requirements; 2.4 Non-Functional Requirements; 3 Related Work; 4 The ODS Portal Architecture; 4.1 Overview

4.2 Components5 Implementation of the Ods Portal; 6 Conclusions and Future Work; References; Chapter 3; The Evolution of University Open Courses in Transforming Learning: Experiences from Mainland China; 1 The Evolution Route of University Open Courses in the Past 20 Years; 2 The Initiation of Open Educational Resources; 2.1 The Most Popular Project with Free Online Course Materials in Higher Education: MIT OpenCourseWare; 2.2 The Most Influential National Program to Promote Curriculum Quality through Open Course: National Pilot Curriculum in China

3 The Popularization of Lecture Video Clips Through Internet3.1 Illumination of Flipped Classes via Using Educational Video Clips: Khan Academy; 3.2 The Pool of Lecture Video Clips of Elite Universities: iTunes U; 3.3 The National Program of Lecture Video Clips: Quality Video Open Course in China; 4 The Prevalence of Massive Open Online Courses; 4.1 The Threshold of MOOCs in Elite Universities; 4.2 The Response to MOOCs from Chinese Industry; 5 The Implication of Open Courses in Transforming Learning; 5.1 The Framework for Watching Open Courses

5.2 The Coupling of Learning And Teaching Process In Open Courses5.3 The Positive Reaction to MOOCs from the Chinese Government; References; Chapter 4; Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and Massively Multiplayer Online Games (MMOGs): Synergies and Lessons to Be Learned; 1 Introduction; 2 MMOGs and MOOCs: Synergies; 3 Learning Processes, Practices, and Pedagogies; 4 Engagement and Immersion; 4.1 Networks, Groups, and Interactions; 4.2 Structure, Freedom, and Control; 4.3 Assessment of Learning; 5 Discussion and Conclusions; References; Chapter 5

Supporting Open Access to Teaching and Learning of People with Disabilities 1 Introduction; 2 Requirements of the Inclusive Learning Portal; 2.1 Terminology; 2.2 Users; 2.3 Functional Requirements; 2.4 Nonfunctional Requirements; 3 Related Work; 4 The Inclusive Learning Portal Architecture; 4.1 Overview; 4.2 Components; 5 Implementation of the Inclusive Learning Portal; 6 Conclusions; References; Chapter 6 ; Development of Visualization of Learning Outcomes Using Curriculum Mapping; 1 Background; 2 Outline of NBAS; 3 Visualization of Learning Outcomes

4 Examination of How Far it is Possible for Teachers on Major Programmes to Understand Learning Outcomes

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Demetrios G. Sampson (Department of Digital Systems, University of Piraeus & Informatics and Telematics Institute, Centre for Research and Technology - Hellas, Greece, sampson@iti.gr) has received a Diploma in Electrical Engineering from the Democritus University of Thrace, Greece in 1989 and a Ph.D. in Electronic Systems Engineering from the University of Essex, UK in 1995. He is a Full Professor of Digital Systems for Learning and Education at the Department of Digital Systems, University of Piraeus, Greece and a Research Fellow at the Information Technologies Institute (ITI), Centre of Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH). He is the Founder and Director of the Advanced Digital Systems and Services for Education and Learning (ASK) since 1999. He is the co-author of more than 312 publications in scientific books, journals and conferences with at least 1400 known citations (h-index: 20). He has received 6 times Best Paper Award in International Conferences on Advanced Learning Technologies. He is a Senior and Golden Core Member of IEEE and he was the elected Chair of the IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Learning Technologies (2008-2011). He is Co-Editor-in-Chief of the Educational Technology and Society Journal (impact factor 1.171, 2012). He is also a Member of the Steering Committee of the IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies, Member of the Editorial Board of 22 International/National Journals and a Guest Co-Editor in 26 Special Issues of International Journals. His participation in the organization of scientific conferences involves: General and/or Program Committee Chair in 35 International Conferences, Program Committees Member in 345 International/National Scientific Conferences. He has been a Keynote/Invited Speaker in 51 International/National Conferences. He has been project director, principle investigator and/or consultant in 65 R&D projects with external funding at the range of 14 Million e (1991-2016).nbsp; He is the recipient of the IEEE Computer Society Distinguished Service Award (July 2012).</p> <p> Dirk Ifenthaler (Deakin University, Australia, dirk@ifenthaler.info) is the Director, Centre for Research in Digital Learning at Deakin University. His previous roles include Manager of Applied Research and Learning Analytics at Open Universities Australia, Affiliate Research Scholar at the University of Oklahoma, USA, and Interim Department Chair and Professor for Educational Science at the University of Mannheim, Germany. Professor Ifenthaler was a 2012 Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at the Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education, the University of Oklahoma, USA. Dirk''s background is in cognitive psychology, educational technology, statistics, and teacher education. He developed automated and computer-based methodologies for the assessment, analysis, and feedback of graphical and natural language representations. His research outcomes include numerous co-authored books, book series, book chapters, journal articles, and international conference papers. Dirk is the Editor-in-Chief of Technology, Knowledge and Learning and a member of the Editorial Board for Educational Technology Research and Development. He is the 2013-2014 President for the AECT (Association for Educational Communications and Technology) Division Design and Development, 2013-2014 Chair for the AERA (American Educational Research Association) Special Interest Group Technology, Instruction, Cognition and Learning and Co-Program Chair for the international conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA). Dirk received the 2012 Outstanding Journal Article Award by AECT, 2009 Outstanding Reviewer Award for Educational Technology Research and Development and the 2006 Outstanding Dissertation Award by the University of Freiburg, Germany.</p> <p> Pedro Isaias (Universidade Alberta, Portugal, pisaias@uab.pt) is an associate professor at Universidade Aberta (Portuguese Open University) in Lisbon, Portugal, responsible for several courses and director of the master degree program in Electronic Commerce and Internet since its start in 2003. He is co-founder and president of IADIS - International Association for Development of the Information Society, a scientific non-profit association. He holds a PhD in Information Management (in the speciality of information and decision systems) from the New University of Lisbon. Author of several books (both as author/co-author and editor/co-editor), journal and conference papers, and research reports, all in the information systems area, he has headed several conferences and workshops within the mentioned area. He has also been responsible for the scientific coordination of several EU funded research projects. He is co-editor of the Interactive Technologies and Smart Education (ITSE) Journal, the editor of the IADIS Journal on WWW/Internet (IJWI) and the co-editor of the IADIS Journal on Computer Science and Information Systems (IJCSIS). He is also member of the editorial board of several journals and program committee member of several conferences and workshops. At the moment he conducts research activity related to Information Systems in general, E-Learning, E-Commerce and WWW related areas.</p> <p> J. Michael Spector (University of North Texas, USA, mike.spector@unt.edu) is Chair of Learning Technologies in the College of Information at the University of North Texas. His recent research is in the areas of intelligent support for instructional design, system dynamics based learning environments, assessing learning in complex domains, distance learning, and technology integration in education. Dr. Spector served on the International Board of Standards for Training, Performance and Instruction (IBSTPI) as Executive Vice President; he is on the Executive Committee of the IEEE Learning Technology Technical Committee and is Past-President of the Association for Educational and Communications Technology (AECT). He is the editor of the Development Section of Educational Technology Research & Development, and he serves on numerous other editorial boards. He co-edited the third and fourth editions of the Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology, and has more than 100 journal articles, book chapters and books to his credit.</p>

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