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Driving Demand for Broadband Networks and Services.

By: Katz, Raul L.
Contributor(s): Berry, Taylor A.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Signals and Communication Technology: Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2014Description: 1 online resource (314 p.).ISBN: 9783319071978.Subject(s): Broadband communication systems | Computers -- Social aspects | Information technology -- Social aspects | Internetworking (Telecommunication) | Wireless communication systemsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Driving Demand for Broadband Networks and ServicesDDC classification: 384 LOC classification: QA76.9 .C66TK5103.2Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface; Contents; 1 Introduction; References; 2 Assessing the Broadband Demand Gap; 2.1…Measuring the Broadband Demand Gap; 2.1.1 The Fixed Broadband Demand Gap; 2.1.2 The Mobile Broadband Demand Gap; 2.1.3 Demand Gap and the Interrelationship Between Fixed and Mobile Broadband; 2.2…Understanding the Residential Broadband Demand Gap; 2.2.1 The Affordability Barrier; 2.2.2 Limited Digital Literacy; 2.2.2.1 Broadband, Digital Literacy, and Education; 2.2.2.2 Broadband, Digital Literacy, and Age; 2.2.3 Lack of Content Relevance or Interest
2.2.4 Broadband Diffusion Cycles and the Importance of Adoption Structural Factors2.3…Understanding the Enterprise Broadband Demand Gap; 2.3.1 The Economic Barrier; 2.3.2 Limited Technology Training; 2.3.3 Slow Assimilation of Broadband; 2.4…Broadband Demand Gap Diagnostic; References; 3 Creating Awareness; 3.1…Developing Basic Digital Literacy; 3.1.1 Digital Literacy Through Formal Education Programs; 3.1.1.1 Primary School Programs; 3.1.1.2 Secondary School Programs; 3.1.1.3 Distance Learning Programs; 3.1.1.4 Digital Literacy for Teachers; 3.1.2 Targeted Digital Literacy Programs
3.1.2.1 Adult Education Programs3.1.2.2 Digital Literacy for Disadvantaged/Underprivileged Population; 3.1.2.3 Digital Literacy for Women; 3.1.2.4 Digital Literacy Programs in Rural Isolated Areas; 3.1.2.5 Digital Literacy for Persons with Disabilities; 3.1.2.6 Digital Literacy for the Elderly; 3.2…Community Access Centers; 3.2.1 Types of Shared or Community Access Centers; 3.2.1.1 Digital Community Centers; 3.2.1.2 Cybercafés; 3.2.1.3 Local Area Network Houses; 3.2.2 Economics of Shared Public Access Centers; 3.2.3 Ancillary Access Centers; 3.2.4 Stand-Alone Public Access Centers
3.3…Advanced ICT Training3.4…Small and Medium Enterprises; 3.4.1 Training for SMEs; 3.4.2 Consulting Services for SMEs; 3.4.3 Broadband and New Firm Formation; 3.4.3.1 Evidence that Broadband Facilitates Entrepreneurship; 3.4.3.2 Virtual Business Incubation; 3.4.3.3 Online Mentoring for Startups; 3.5…Sponsorship Structures of Awareness Programs; 3.5.1 Public Programs; 3.5.2 Multilateral and Public Donors; 3.5.3 Public-Private Associations; 3.5.4 Private Efforts; References; 4 Achieving Affordability; 4.1…Economics of Broadband Adoption; 4.2…Broadband Service Pricing as a Barrier to Adoption
4.2.1 Cross-Country Comparisons of Fixed and Mobile Broadband Pricing4.2.2 Broadband Price Elasticity; 4.2.2.1 Fixed Broadband Price Elasticity; 4.2.2.2 Mobile Broadband Price Elasticity; 4.2.3 The Effect of Competition on Broadband Pricing; 4.2.4 The Role of Mobile Broadband in Lowering the Affordability Barrier at the Bottom of the Pyramid; 4.2.4.1 Reduction of the Price of Mobile Broadband; 4.2.4.2 Pricing Flexibility; 4.2.4.3 Smartphone Contribution; 4.2.5 Policy Initiatives Aimed at Reducing the Cost of Broadband Service; 4.2.5.1 Launch by a Publicly Owned Service Provider
4.2.5.2 Agreement Reached by Private Operators
Summary: This book examines the reasons why various groups around the world choose not to adopt broadband services and evaluates strategies to stimulate the demand that will lead to increased broadband use. It introduces readers to the benefits of higher adoption rates while examining the progress that developed and emerging countries have made in stimulating broadband demand. By relying on concepts such as a supply and demand gap, broadband price elasticity, and demand promotion, this book explains differences between the fixed and mobile broadband demand gap, introducing the notions of substitution a
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QA76.9 .C66 | TK5103.2 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1783022 Available EBL1783022

Preface; Contents; 1 Introduction; References; 2 Assessing the Broadband Demand Gap; 2.1…Measuring the Broadband Demand Gap; 2.1.1 The Fixed Broadband Demand Gap; 2.1.2 The Mobile Broadband Demand Gap; 2.1.3 Demand Gap and the Interrelationship Between Fixed and Mobile Broadband; 2.2…Understanding the Residential Broadband Demand Gap; 2.2.1 The Affordability Barrier; 2.2.2 Limited Digital Literacy; 2.2.2.1 Broadband, Digital Literacy, and Education; 2.2.2.2 Broadband, Digital Literacy, and Age; 2.2.3 Lack of Content Relevance or Interest

2.2.4 Broadband Diffusion Cycles and the Importance of Adoption Structural Factors2.3…Understanding the Enterprise Broadband Demand Gap; 2.3.1 The Economic Barrier; 2.3.2 Limited Technology Training; 2.3.3 Slow Assimilation of Broadband; 2.4…Broadband Demand Gap Diagnostic; References; 3 Creating Awareness; 3.1…Developing Basic Digital Literacy; 3.1.1 Digital Literacy Through Formal Education Programs; 3.1.1.1 Primary School Programs; 3.1.1.2 Secondary School Programs; 3.1.1.3 Distance Learning Programs; 3.1.1.4 Digital Literacy for Teachers; 3.1.2 Targeted Digital Literacy Programs

3.1.2.1 Adult Education Programs3.1.2.2 Digital Literacy for Disadvantaged/Underprivileged Population; 3.1.2.3 Digital Literacy for Women; 3.1.2.4 Digital Literacy Programs in Rural Isolated Areas; 3.1.2.5 Digital Literacy for Persons with Disabilities; 3.1.2.6 Digital Literacy for the Elderly; 3.2…Community Access Centers; 3.2.1 Types of Shared or Community Access Centers; 3.2.1.1 Digital Community Centers; 3.2.1.2 Cybercafés; 3.2.1.3 Local Area Network Houses; 3.2.2 Economics of Shared Public Access Centers; 3.2.3 Ancillary Access Centers; 3.2.4 Stand-Alone Public Access Centers

3.3…Advanced ICT Training3.4…Small and Medium Enterprises; 3.4.1 Training for SMEs; 3.4.2 Consulting Services for SMEs; 3.4.3 Broadband and New Firm Formation; 3.4.3.1 Evidence that Broadband Facilitates Entrepreneurship; 3.4.3.2 Virtual Business Incubation; 3.4.3.3 Online Mentoring for Startups; 3.5…Sponsorship Structures of Awareness Programs; 3.5.1 Public Programs; 3.5.2 Multilateral and Public Donors; 3.5.3 Public-Private Associations; 3.5.4 Private Efforts; References; 4 Achieving Affordability; 4.1…Economics of Broadband Adoption; 4.2…Broadband Service Pricing as a Barrier to Adoption

4.2.1 Cross-Country Comparisons of Fixed and Mobile Broadband Pricing4.2.2 Broadband Price Elasticity; 4.2.2.1 Fixed Broadband Price Elasticity; 4.2.2.2 Mobile Broadband Price Elasticity; 4.2.3 The Effect of Competition on Broadband Pricing; 4.2.4 The Role of Mobile Broadband in Lowering the Affordability Barrier at the Bottom of the Pyramid; 4.2.4.1 Reduction of the Price of Mobile Broadband; 4.2.4.2 Pricing Flexibility; 4.2.4.3 Smartphone Contribution; 4.2.5 Policy Initiatives Aimed at Reducing the Cost of Broadband Service; 4.2.5.1 Launch by a Publicly Owned Service Provider

4.2.5.2 Agreement Reached by Private Operators

This book examines the reasons why various groups around the world choose not to adopt broadband services and evaluates strategies to stimulate the demand that will lead to increased broadband use. It introduces readers to the benefits of higher adoption rates while examining the progress that developed and emerging countries have made in stimulating broadband demand. By relying on concepts such as a supply and demand gap, broadband price elasticity, and demand promotion, this book explains differences between the fixed and mobile broadband demand gap, introducing the notions of substitution a

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Raul Katz </p> <p>Dr. Raul Katz is President of Telecom Advisory Services LLC, a consulting firm active in the fields of strategy, economic analysis and regulation. He was previously a Lead Partner at Booz Allen Hamilton, where he was a member of the firm's Leadership Team and Head of the US and Latin America telecommunication practices. As an international telecom industry consulting executive, Dr. Katz has provided direction to top management of major telecommunications, software and information services companies in the areas of business strategy, consumer/industrial marketing and general management approaches. In addition, Dr. Katz has worked with governments and international organizations in the development of regulatory frameworks and policies, National Broadband Plans, Digital Agendas and National Technology Strategies. In particular, he has supported the governments of Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Brazil and Mexico.</p> <p>Dr. Katz is also a Director of Business Strategy Research at Columbia University's Center for Tele-Information, an Adjunct Professor in Columbia Business School Division of Finance and Economics, and a Visiting Professor at the Universidad de San Andres in Argentina. He has published articles in journals such as Telecommunications Policy , Technovation , Info , Strategy and Business , Communications and Strategies , Interconomics , and America's Network . His first book, The Information Society: an International Perspective, focusing on the deregulation trends in the worldwide telecommunications industry was published in 1988. His second book Creative Destruction: Business Survival Strategies in the Global Internet Economy , addressing discontinuities in the telecommunications industry, was published in 2000, and translated into Japanese. His third book The Role of ICT in Development was published in 2010.</p> <p> Taylor Berry </p> <p>Taylor Berry has served as a consultant with Telecom Advisory Services since 2011. With a background in communication technology, Ms. Berry's professional experience has centered on Internet industry and global telecommunications trends, with particular attention devoted to the impact of increased access to these services. Ms. Berry received her Masters in Arts from Georgetown University, where she completed a dual-degree program in Communication Technology and International Business Diplomacy. Prior to attending Georgetown, Ms. Berry studied at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland.</p> <p>nbsp;</p>

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