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Color Revolutions in Eurasia.

By: Gerlach, Julia.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.SpringerBriefs in Political Science: Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2014Description: 1 online resource (58 p.).ISBN: 9783319078724.Subject(s): Government, Resistance to -- Asia | Government, Resistance to -- Europe | National liberation movements -- Asia | National liberation movements -- EuropeGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Color Revolutions in EurasiaDDC classification: 322.44095 | 323.044 | 323.044094 LOC classification: DS35.2Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; 1 Introduction; Abstract; 2 Mapping Color Revolutions; Abstract; 2.1…Successful Cases; 2.1.1 Serbia's Bulldozer Revolution (2000); 2.1.2 Georgia's Rose Revolution (2003); 2.1.3 Ukraine's Orange Revolution (2004/2005); 2.1.4 Kyrgyzstan's Tulip Revolution (2005); 2.1.5 Comparison; 2.2…Attempted Cases; 2.2.1 Armenia (2003/2004); 2.2.2 Azerbaijan (2005); 2.2.3 Belarus (2006); 2.2.4 Russia (2011/2012); 2.2.5 Comparison; 3 Explaining Color Revolutions; Abstract; 3.1…Conceptualizing Color Revolutions; 3.1.1 Approaches; 3.1.2 Concept; 3.2…Internal Dimension: Regime versus Opposition
3.2.1 The Opposition's Strategies for Change3.2.2 The Regime's Strategies for Stability; 3.3…External Dimension: The International Context; 3.3.1 Linkage and Leverage; 3.3.2 Democratic and Authoritarian Diffusion; 4 Interpreting Color Revolutions; Abstract; Appendix; References
Summary: Why have large-scale protests and mass demonstrations in some post-socialist Eurasian states led to the fall of autocratic leaders, whereas similar other regimes prevail This book addresses the question by providing an overview of eight cases of so-called Color Revolutions, and explains factors of 'success' and 'failure' by discussing the state-of-the-art in the political science discourse on Color Revolutions. It concludes by summarizing and contextualizing the results of the analysis and highlighting open research for political science on the theme of Color Revolutio
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Contents; 1 Introduction; Abstract; 2 Mapping Color Revolutions; Abstract; 2.1…Successful Cases; 2.1.1 Serbia's Bulldozer Revolution (2000); 2.1.2 Georgia's Rose Revolution (2003); 2.1.3 Ukraine's Orange Revolution (2004/2005); 2.1.4 Kyrgyzstan's Tulip Revolution (2005); 2.1.5 Comparison; 2.2…Attempted Cases; 2.2.1 Armenia (2003/2004); 2.2.2 Azerbaijan (2005); 2.2.3 Belarus (2006); 2.2.4 Russia (2011/2012); 2.2.5 Comparison; 3 Explaining Color Revolutions; Abstract; 3.1…Conceptualizing Color Revolutions; 3.1.1 Approaches; 3.1.2 Concept; 3.2…Internal Dimension: Regime versus Opposition

3.2.1 The Opposition's Strategies for Change3.2.2 The Regime's Strategies for Stability; 3.3…External Dimension: The International Context; 3.3.1 Linkage and Leverage; 3.3.2 Democratic and Authoritarian Diffusion; 4 Interpreting Color Revolutions; Abstract; Appendix; References

Why have large-scale protests and mass demonstrations in some post-socialist Eurasian states led to the fall of autocratic leaders, whereas similar other regimes prevail This book addresses the question by providing an overview of eight cases of so-called Color Revolutions, and explains factors of 'success' and 'failure' by discussing the state-of-the-art in the political science discourse on Color Revolutions. It concludes by summarizing and contextualizing the results of the analysis and highlighting open research for political science on the theme of Color Revolutio

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Julia Gerlach is a political scientist researching on political and social change in Russia and Eastern Europe after 1989/1991 with a focus on political protest, the nexus between politics and religion, and political narratives. She has been working at Free University of Berlin, Moscow State Institute for International Relations/MGIMO, and the Aleksanteri Institute at the University of Helsinki.

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