Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Code Breaking in the Pacific.

By: Donovan, Peter.
Contributor(s): Mack, John.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2014Description: 1 online resource (397 p.).ISBN: 9783319082783.Subject(s): Coding theory | Cryptography | World War, 1939-1945 -- Cryptography | World War, 1939-1945 -- Military intelligenceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Code Breaking in the PacificDDC classification: 003.54 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface; Acknowledgements; Note to the Reader; Acronyms and Abbreviations; Contents; Part I Build Up; 1 Communications and Sigint; 1.1 Electric Telegraph and Radio; 1.2 Early Military Aspects; 1.3 Cables in the First World War; 1.4 Tannenberg; 1.5 British Naval Intelligence in WW1: Room 40; 1.6 Jutland; 1.7 Diplomatic Intelligence: Zimmermann Telegram; 1.8 Army Signals Intelligence in WW1; 1.9 Morse Code; 1.10 Kana Morse, Roma-ji and the ChineseTelegraphic Code; 1.11 Baudot Codes, Teleprinters and Teletypes; 1.12 Use of Encryption Systems; 1.13 The Components of Signals Intelligence
1.14 Hollerith Equipment1.15 IBM Cards; 1.16 Encrypted Code Book Systems; 1.17 Restrictions on the Use of Comint; 1.18 Other Sources of Intelligence; 1.19 The Personnel; 2 Japanese Expansion 1895-1941; 2.1 From 1895 to 1914; 2.2 Japan During WW1 and Its Aftermath; 2.3 Japanese Actions During the 1930s; 2.4 Timperley and Kennedy; 3 The GCCS 1919-1941; 3.1 Early Activities; 3.2 Building Up Sigint Strength Against Japan; 3.3 Eric Nave; 3.4 Japanese Naval Attaché Ciphers; 3.5 John Tiltman; 3.6 Movement in 1939; 3.7 Alan Turing; 3.8 Growth of GCCS; 3.9 Combined Bureau Middle East; 3.10 Kamer 14
3.11 Japanese Army Ciphers4 William Friedman and the US Army; 4.1 From Riverbank to Washington 1917-1930; 4.2 American Black Chamber and Diplomatic Codes; 4.3 The Signals Intelligence Service; 4.4 Elizebeth Friedman; 5 Early American Naval Sigint; 5.1 The 1920s and the 1930s; 5.2 Agnes Meyer Driscoll; 5.3 Advanced DF and Interception Bases in the Pacific; 5.4 The October 1940 Instructions; 5.5 Developments in Intelligence Cooperation 1940-1941; 5.6 Fabian and Friedman on JN-25; 6 Developments in Australia; 6.1 The First Few Steps; 6.2 The 1919 Jellicoe Report
6.3 Infrastructure in Australia at the End of 19366.4 Real Expansion: The Period 1937-1941; 6.5 Diplomatic Sigint; 6.6 The Coastwatchers; 6.7 Developments in New Zealand; 6.8 The 1947 FRUMEL Commendation; 7 Preparedness for Attack?; 7.1 Incompletely Broken Code Books; 7.2 Aircraft Versus Warships; 7.3 The Intelligence Build Up; 7.4 War with the USA?; 7.5 Relevant Sigint in November and December; 7.6 The Haruna Code Destruction Messages; 7.7 The Aftermath: Processing and Distributionof Intelligence; 7.8 The Aftermath: Naval Comint; Appendix 1 The Mackenzie King Diaries
Appendix 2 The 1945-1946 InvestigationPart II Technical; 8 Major Encryption Systems; 8.1 Cipher Machines; 8.2 Purple; 8.3 The Polish Work on the Early Enigma Machines; 8.4 A Remarkable Document; 8.5 Enciphered Teleprinters; 8.6 The Typex; 8.7 The American Sigaba or ECM; 8.8 Decryption of a Machine Cipher; 8.9 Additive Cipher Systems; 8.10 Component 1: The Code Book; 8.11 Component 2: The Reverse Book; 8.12 Component 3: The Additive Table; 8.13 Component 4: The Rules; 8.14 A Distinction in Additive Table Usage; 8.15 General Comments; 8.16 Non-primary Decryption; 8.17 The One-Time Pad
8.18 The Security of Additive Systems
Summary: This book reveals the historical context and the evolution of the technically complex Allied Signals Intelligence (Sigint) activity against Japan from 1920 to 1945. It traces the all-important genesis and development of the cryptanalytic techniques used to break the main Japanese Navy code (JN-25) and the Japanese Army's Water Transport Code during WWII. This is the first book to describe, explain and analyze the code breaking techniques developed and used to provide this intelligence, thus closing the sole remaining gap in the published accounts of the Pacific War. The authors also explore th
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QA268 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1802788 Available EBL1802788

Preface; Acknowledgements; Note to the Reader; Acronyms and Abbreviations; Contents; Part I Build Up; 1 Communications and Sigint; 1.1 Electric Telegraph and Radio; 1.2 Early Military Aspects; 1.3 Cables in the First World War; 1.4 Tannenberg; 1.5 British Naval Intelligence in WW1: Room 40; 1.6 Jutland; 1.7 Diplomatic Intelligence: Zimmermann Telegram; 1.8 Army Signals Intelligence in WW1; 1.9 Morse Code; 1.10 Kana Morse, Roma-ji and the ChineseTelegraphic Code; 1.11 Baudot Codes, Teleprinters and Teletypes; 1.12 Use of Encryption Systems; 1.13 The Components of Signals Intelligence

1.14 Hollerith Equipment1.15 IBM Cards; 1.16 Encrypted Code Book Systems; 1.17 Restrictions on the Use of Comint; 1.18 Other Sources of Intelligence; 1.19 The Personnel; 2 Japanese Expansion 1895-1941; 2.1 From 1895 to 1914; 2.2 Japan During WW1 and Its Aftermath; 2.3 Japanese Actions During the 1930s; 2.4 Timperley and Kennedy; 3 The GCCS 1919-1941; 3.1 Early Activities; 3.2 Building Up Sigint Strength Against Japan; 3.3 Eric Nave; 3.4 Japanese Naval Attaché Ciphers; 3.5 John Tiltman; 3.6 Movement in 1939; 3.7 Alan Turing; 3.8 Growth of GCCS; 3.9 Combined Bureau Middle East; 3.10 Kamer 14

3.11 Japanese Army Ciphers4 William Friedman and the US Army; 4.1 From Riverbank to Washington 1917-1930; 4.2 American Black Chamber and Diplomatic Codes; 4.3 The Signals Intelligence Service; 4.4 Elizebeth Friedman; 5 Early American Naval Sigint; 5.1 The 1920s and the 1930s; 5.2 Agnes Meyer Driscoll; 5.3 Advanced DF and Interception Bases in the Pacific; 5.4 The October 1940 Instructions; 5.5 Developments in Intelligence Cooperation 1940-1941; 5.6 Fabian and Friedman on JN-25; 6 Developments in Australia; 6.1 The First Few Steps; 6.2 The 1919 Jellicoe Report

6.3 Infrastructure in Australia at the End of 19366.4 Real Expansion: The Period 1937-1941; 6.5 Diplomatic Sigint; 6.6 The Coastwatchers; 6.7 Developments in New Zealand; 6.8 The 1947 FRUMEL Commendation; 7 Preparedness for Attack?; 7.1 Incompletely Broken Code Books; 7.2 Aircraft Versus Warships; 7.3 The Intelligence Build Up; 7.4 War with the USA?; 7.5 Relevant Sigint in November and December; 7.6 The Haruna Code Destruction Messages; 7.7 The Aftermath: Processing and Distributionof Intelligence; 7.8 The Aftermath: Naval Comint; Appendix 1 The Mackenzie King Diaries

Appendix 2 The 1945-1946 InvestigationPart II Technical; 8 Major Encryption Systems; 8.1 Cipher Machines; 8.2 Purple; 8.3 The Polish Work on the Early Enigma Machines; 8.4 A Remarkable Document; 8.5 Enciphered Teleprinters; 8.6 The Typex; 8.7 The American Sigaba or ECM; 8.8 Decryption of a Machine Cipher; 8.9 Additive Cipher Systems; 8.10 Component 1: The Code Book; 8.11 Component 2: The Reverse Book; 8.12 Component 3: The Additive Table; 8.13 Component 4: The Rules; 8.14 A Distinction in Additive Table Usage; 8.15 General Comments; 8.16 Non-primary Decryption; 8.17 The One-Time Pad

8.18 The Security of Additive Systems

This book reveals the historical context and the evolution of the technically complex Allied Signals Intelligence (Sigint) activity against Japan from 1920 to 1945. It traces the all-important genesis and development of the cryptanalytic techniques used to break the main Japanese Navy code (JN-25) and the Japanese Army's Water Transport Code during WWII. This is the first book to describe, explain and analyze the code breaking techniques developed and used to provide this intelligence, thus closing the sole remaining gap in the published accounts of the Pacific War. The authors also explore th

Description based upon print version of record.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.