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Fictional Names : A Critical Study of Some Theories Not Committed to the Existence of Fictional Entities

By: Napolano, Angelo.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Newcastle upon Tyne : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014Description: 1 online resource (125 p.).ISBN: 9781443869058.Subject(s): American fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism | American fiction -- 20th century -- History and criticism | American literature -- 19th century -- History and criticism | American literature -- 20th century -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Fictional Names : A Critical Study of Some Theories Not Committed to the Existence of Fictional EntitiesDDC classification: 810.9 LOC classification: PS221 .N384 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
TABLE OF CONTENTS; PREFACE; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; PART I - FICTIONAL NAMES; PART II - FICTIONAL NAMES AND GAPPY PROPOSITIONS; PART III - A UNIFIED PRAGMATIC ACCOUNT FOR VACUOUS NAMES; PART IV - PRETENCE CONSTRUAL AND FICTIONAL NAMES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX
Summary: If it is true that when we use a name, it must be the name of something, what is it that we name when we use terms such as Sherlock Holmes, Odysseus, and many of the same type? What is it we are addressing and how do the referential relations work assuming that we are thinking or talking about something when we use these terms? Otherwise, if we are speaking about nothing when we use a fictional name, how do we understand the linguistic process which gives us the impression of speaking about s...
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS221 .N384 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1837064 Available EBL1837064

TABLE OF CONTENTS; PREFACE; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; PART I - FICTIONAL NAMES; PART II - FICTIONAL NAMES AND GAPPY PROPOSITIONS; PART III - A UNIFIED PRAGMATIC ACCOUNT FOR VACUOUS NAMES; PART IV - PRETENCE CONSTRUAL AND FICTIONAL NAMES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX

If it is true that when we use a name, it must be the name of something, what is it that we name when we use terms such as Sherlock Holmes, Odysseus, and many of the same type? What is it we are addressing and how do the referential relations work assuming that we are thinking or talking about something when we use these terms? Otherwise, if we are speaking about nothing when we use a fictional name, how do we understand the linguistic process which gives us the impression of speaking about s...

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