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Technology and the Law on the Use of Force : New Security Challenges in the Twenty-First Century

By: Maogoto, Jackson.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Routledge Research in International Law: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (130 p.).ISBN: 9781134445509.Subject(s): Computer networks -- Security measures | Computer security -- Law and legislation | Cyber intelligence (Computer security) | Cyberterrorism -- Prevention | Information warfare (International law) | LAW / General | LAW / International | Malware (Computer software) -- Prevention | War (International law)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Technology and the Law on the Use of Force : New Security Challenges in the Twenty-First CenturyDDC classification: 341.6/3 | 341.63 LOC classification: KZ6718 .M34 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Dedication; Acknowledgements; List of acronyms; Table of cases; Table of statutes; Introduction; 1 Use of force: displaced twentieth-century rules, norms and standards?; Introduction; The concept of armed attack; Article 51: the State's right to respond in self-defence; The restrictionist approach; The counter-restrictionist approach; The UN Charter challenged: shades of legal grey; The UN Charter: generalities revisited; Conclusion; 2 Revolution in military affairs: hi-tech weaponry, low-tech legal safeguards; Introduction
The fourth domain: outer spaceThe fifth domain: cyber space; Conclusion; 3 The fourth domain: ascendance of outer space as a war theatre; Introduction ; 'Peaceful': easy understanding or difficult enunciation; The intersection of the UN Charter regime on force and Outer Space Law; Closing the loop? Network centric warfare matures; The Outer Space Treaty; The Limited Test Ban Treaty; The Liability Convention; The Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty; Weaponisation and militarisation of outer space revisited; Conclusion; 4 War in the fifth domain: cyberwarfare; Introduction
Cyberattacks: classifications and analytical modelsThe colours of cyber interruptions and disruptions; Cyber conflict along the spectrum of armed attack; Smokeless warfare: worms, viruses and trojans; Information warfare: colliding or colluding with the regime on the use of force?; Physical destruction: is data property?; Electronic blockades: new perception or old shackles; Small-scale or large-scale attacks: reflections on quantitative evaluation; Specific targeting of military facilities: any difference; Conclusion; 5 Discarding law by analogy: old legal frameworks for new threats
IntroductionOuter space: addressing a clear and present danger; Resolving the 'peaceful purposes' conundrum: disengaging legal shadows from operational substance; Re-orientating the peace and security framework; Coercive arms control; The International Environmental Law Platform; Cyber space: act now not later; Refocusing on the principle of non-intervention; A conclusive multilateral framework?; Rethinking legal thresholds for information warfare; Conclusion; Conclusion; Bibliography; Index
Summary: As governmental and non-governmental operations become progressively supported by vast automated systems and electronic data flows, attacks of government information infrastructure, operations and processes pose a serious threat to economic and military interests. In 2007 Estonia suffered a month long cyber assault to its digital infrastructure, described in cyberspace as 'Web War I'. In 2010, a worm-Stuxnet-was identified as supervisory control and data acquisition systems at Iran's uranium enrichment plant, presumably in an attempt to set back Iran's nuclear programme. The dependence upon te
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KZ6718 .M34 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1843449 Available EBL1843449

Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Dedication; Acknowledgements; List of acronyms; Table of cases; Table of statutes; Introduction; 1 Use of force: displaced twentieth-century rules, norms and standards?; Introduction; The concept of armed attack; Article 51: the State's right to respond in self-defence; The restrictionist approach; The counter-restrictionist approach; The UN Charter challenged: shades of legal grey; The UN Charter: generalities revisited; Conclusion; 2 Revolution in military affairs: hi-tech weaponry, low-tech legal safeguards; Introduction

The fourth domain: outer spaceThe fifth domain: cyber space; Conclusion; 3 The fourth domain: ascendance of outer space as a war theatre; Introduction ; 'Peaceful': easy understanding or difficult enunciation; The intersection of the UN Charter regime on force and Outer Space Law; Closing the loop? Network centric warfare matures; The Outer Space Treaty; The Limited Test Ban Treaty; The Liability Convention; The Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty; Weaponisation and militarisation of outer space revisited; Conclusion; 4 War in the fifth domain: cyberwarfare; Introduction

Cyberattacks: classifications and analytical modelsThe colours of cyber interruptions and disruptions; Cyber conflict along the spectrum of armed attack; Smokeless warfare: worms, viruses and trojans; Information warfare: colliding or colluding with the regime on the use of force?; Physical destruction: is data property?; Electronic blockades: new perception or old shackles; Small-scale or large-scale attacks: reflections on quantitative evaluation; Specific targeting of military facilities: any difference; Conclusion; 5 Discarding law by analogy: old legal frameworks for new threats

IntroductionOuter space: addressing a clear and present danger; Resolving the 'peaceful purposes' conundrum: disengaging legal shadows from operational substance; Re-orientating the peace and security framework; Coercive arms control; The International Environmental Law Platform; Cyber space: act now not later; Refocusing on the principle of non-intervention; A conclusive multilateral framework?; Rethinking legal thresholds for information warfare; Conclusion; Conclusion; Bibliography; Index

As governmental and non-governmental operations become progressively supported by vast automated systems and electronic data flows, attacks of government information infrastructure, operations and processes pose a serious threat to economic and military interests. In 2007 Estonia suffered a month long cyber assault to its digital infrastructure, described in cyberspace as 'Web War I'. In 2010, a worm-Stuxnet-was identified as supervisory control and data acquisition systems at Iran's uranium enrichment plant, presumably in an attempt to set back Iran's nuclear programme. The dependence upon te

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jackson Maogoto is Senior Lecturer at the University of Manchester, UK.

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