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Flux Control in Biological Systems : From Enzymes to Populations and Ecosystems

By: Schulze, Ernst-Detlef.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Physiological Ecology: Publisher: Burlington : Elsevier Science, 2012Description: 1 online resource (540 p.).ISBN: 9780323139427.Subject(s): Biological control systems | Ecophysiology | Plant physiologyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Flux Control in Biological Systems : From Enzymes to Populations and EcosystemsDDC classification: 581.188 LOC classification: QH508 .F58 1994QH508.F58Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Flux Control in Biological Systems: From Enzymes to Populations and Ecosystems; Copyright Page; Table ofContents; Contributors; Preface; Part I: Flux Control at the Cellular Level; Chapter1. The Malate Valve: Flux Control at the Enzymatic Level; I. Introduction; II. The ATP to NADPH Balance; III. Redox Control of the Malate Valve; IV. A Futile Cycle Provides the Machinery for Flux Regulation; V. Extra Sequences in the Polypeptide Are Responsible for Redox Control; VI. Energy Expenditure for Redox Control; VII. Conclusions; References
Chapter 2. Flux Control at the Level of the Pathway: Studies with Mutants and Transgenic Plants Having a Decreased Activity of Enzymes Involved in Photosynthesis PartitioningI. Introduction; II. The Traditional Approach to the Study of Regulation; III. Metabolic Regulations Illustrated by Photosynthetic Sucrose Synthesis; IV. Regulation and Control; V. Measurement of Flux Control Coefficients Using Mutants andGenetically Manipulated Plants; VI. Flux Control Coefficients of Rubisco during Photosynthesis
VII. Flux Control Coefficients of Four Enzymes in a Linear Pathway:Photosynthetic Starch SynthesisVIII. Control of Partitioning to Sucrose and Starch: An Example ofControl at a Branch Point in Metabolism; IX. What Determines the Flux Control Coefficient of anEnzyme?; X. Measurement of Elasticity Coefficients; XI. Comparison of Flux Control Coefficients and ElasticityCoefficients for PGI and the Cytosolic Frul,6Pase; XII. Conclusions; References; Chapter 3. Controlling the Effects of Excessive Light Energy Fluxes: Dissipative Mechanisms, Repair Processes, and Long-TermAcclimation
I. IntroductionII. Experimental Approach; III. Changes in Photosynthetic Capacity; IV. Changes in Photosynthetic Efficiency; V. Effects of Multiple Stress; VI. Conclusions; References; Part II:Flux Control at the Organismic Level; Chapter 4. Plant Growth, Storage, and Resource Allocation: From Flux Control in a Metabolic Chain to the Whole-Plant Level; I. Introduction; II. What Is Assimilation and How Is It Related to Growth?; III. What Is Storage and How Is It Related to Growth?; IV. Analysis of Whole-Plant Growth Using Mutants and TransgenicPlants
V. Observations of Growth and Storage in Different Plant LifeFormsVI. Conclusions; References; Chapter5. The Morphogenic Response of Plants to Soil Nitrogen: Adaptive Regulation of Biomass Distribution and Nitrogen Metabolism by Phytohormones ; I. Introduction: Nitrogen-Induced Changes of Root Growth; II. The Response of Nitrogen Uptake to Nitrogen Supply; III. Changes in Growth Reduction and in Root-to-Shoot Ratios byNitrogen Deficiency; IV. Analysis of Sink-Source Relations of Plants with Different Nitrogen Status; V. Are Ammonium-Induced Carbon Sinks Morphogenically Effective?
VI. Cytokinins Control the Growth Patterns of Urtica dioica
Summary: Comprehending and modelling biomass production, nutrient, and water fluxes in biological systems requires understanding control mechanisms at various levels of organiztion. This new book, with 16 pages of four-colorplates, compares patterns and mechanisms of regulation-starting from enzyme reactions and ending at the population and ecosystem level. By doing so, the book investigates the general principles of how fluxes are adjusted and regulated. Such principles areessential for preparing effective models and for predicting human impacts on ecosystems. Flux Control in Biological Systems: From
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QH508 .F58 1994 | QH508.F58 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1129982 Available EBL1129982

Front Cover; Flux Control in Biological Systems: From Enzymes to Populations and Ecosystems; Copyright Page; Table ofContents; Contributors; Preface; Part I: Flux Control at the Cellular Level; Chapter1. The Malate Valve: Flux Control at the Enzymatic Level; I. Introduction; II. The ATP to NADPH Balance; III. Redox Control of the Malate Valve; IV. A Futile Cycle Provides the Machinery for Flux Regulation; V. Extra Sequences in the Polypeptide Are Responsible for Redox Control; VI. Energy Expenditure for Redox Control; VII. Conclusions; References

Chapter 2. Flux Control at the Level of the Pathway: Studies with Mutants and Transgenic Plants Having a Decreased Activity of Enzymes Involved in Photosynthesis PartitioningI. Introduction; II. The Traditional Approach to the Study of Regulation; III. Metabolic Regulations Illustrated by Photosynthetic Sucrose Synthesis; IV. Regulation and Control; V. Measurement of Flux Control Coefficients Using Mutants andGenetically Manipulated Plants; VI. Flux Control Coefficients of Rubisco during Photosynthesis

VII. Flux Control Coefficients of Four Enzymes in a Linear Pathway:Photosynthetic Starch SynthesisVIII. Control of Partitioning to Sucrose and Starch: An Example ofControl at a Branch Point in Metabolism; IX. What Determines the Flux Control Coefficient of anEnzyme?; X. Measurement of Elasticity Coefficients; XI. Comparison of Flux Control Coefficients and ElasticityCoefficients for PGI and the Cytosolic Frul,6Pase; XII. Conclusions; References; Chapter 3. Controlling the Effects of Excessive Light Energy Fluxes: Dissipative Mechanisms, Repair Processes, and Long-TermAcclimation

I. IntroductionII. Experimental Approach; III. Changes in Photosynthetic Capacity; IV. Changes in Photosynthetic Efficiency; V. Effects of Multiple Stress; VI. Conclusions; References; Part II:Flux Control at the Organismic Level; Chapter 4. Plant Growth, Storage, and Resource Allocation: From Flux Control in a Metabolic Chain to the Whole-Plant Level; I. Introduction; II. What Is Assimilation and How Is It Related to Growth?; III. What Is Storage and How Is It Related to Growth?; IV. Analysis of Whole-Plant Growth Using Mutants and TransgenicPlants

V. Observations of Growth and Storage in Different Plant LifeFormsVI. Conclusions; References; Chapter5. The Morphogenic Response of Plants to Soil Nitrogen: Adaptive Regulation of Biomass Distribution and Nitrogen Metabolism by Phytohormones ; I. Introduction: Nitrogen-Induced Changes of Root Growth; II. The Response of Nitrogen Uptake to Nitrogen Supply; III. Changes in Growth Reduction and in Root-to-Shoot Ratios byNitrogen Deficiency; IV. Analysis of Sink-Source Relations of Plants with Different Nitrogen Status; V. Are Ammonium-Induced Carbon Sinks Morphogenically Effective?

VI. Cytokinins Control the Growth Patterns of Urtica dioica

Comprehending and modelling biomass production, nutrient, and water fluxes in biological systems requires understanding control mechanisms at various levels of organiztion. This new book, with 16 pages of four-colorplates, compares patterns and mechanisms of regulation-starting from enzyme reactions and ending at the population and ecosystem level. By doing so, the book investigates the general principles of how fluxes are adjusted and regulated. Such principles areessential for preparing effective models and for predicting human impacts on ecosystems. Flux Control in Biological Systems: From

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