Normal view MARC view ISBD view

A Forgotten Sisterhood : Pioneering Black Women Educators and Activists in the Jim Crow South

By: McCluskey, Audrey Thomas.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2014Description: 1 online resource (193 p.).ISBN: 9781442211407.Subject(s): African American civil rights workers -- Biography | African American women educators -- Biography | African Americans -- Southern States -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Educators -- United States -- BiographyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Forgotten Sisterhood : Pioneering Black Women Educators and Activists in the Jim Crow SouthDDC classification: 378.43 LOC classification: LA2311 .F384 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Chapter One: The World They Inherited; Chapter Two: "Moving Like a Whirlwind"; Chapter Three: "The Best Secondary School in Georgia"; Chapter Four: "Ringing Up a School"; Chapter Five: "Show Some Daylight Between You"; Chapter Six: "Telling Some Mighty Truths"; Chapter Seven: "The Masses and the Classes"; Chapter Eight: Passing into History; Milestones and Legacies; Bibliography; Special Collections; Index; About the Author
Summary: In the late nineteenth through the mid-twentieth century a small group of women overcame personal and professional hardships to gain national prominence as educational reformers and social activists. This book takes a biographical look at Lucy Craft Laney, Mary McLeod Bethune, Nannie Helen Burroughs, Charlotte Hawkins Brown. The four women knew each other through the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs. The other four women founded schools for African-American children, as well as being activists, lecturers, and suffragists, and the book includes interviews with students who came fro
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
LA2311 .F384 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1864065 Available EBL1864065

Contents; Acknowledgments; Chapter One: The World They Inherited; Chapter Two: "Moving Like a Whirlwind"; Chapter Three: "The Best Secondary School in Georgia"; Chapter Four: "Ringing Up a School"; Chapter Five: "Show Some Daylight Between You"; Chapter Six: "Telling Some Mighty Truths"; Chapter Seven: "The Masses and the Classes"; Chapter Eight: Passing into History; Milestones and Legacies; Bibliography; Special Collections; Index; About the Author

In the late nineteenth through the mid-twentieth century a small group of women overcame personal and professional hardships to gain national prominence as educational reformers and social activists. This book takes a biographical look at Lucy Craft Laney, Mary McLeod Bethune, Nannie Helen Burroughs, Charlotte Hawkins Brown. The four women knew each other through the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs. The other four women founded schools for African-American children, as well as being activists, lecturers, and suffragists, and the book includes interviews with students who came fro

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This slim volume traces the careers of four black women who founded schools to educate and "uplift" African Americans during the nadir of race relations. Lucy Craft Laney, Mary McLeod Bethune, Charlotte Hawkins Brown, and Nannie Helen Burroughs defied the disadvantages of race, class, and gender to form networks and share influence as religious, social, economic, and political leaders in local communities, the nation, and the world. Excellent individual biographies and articles have been written on some of these women, but pulling their stories together helps highlight their uncommon collective power in this era. While they often partnered with and raised funds among men and whites, they valued their autonomy and even criticized these groups in both diplomatic and blunt fashion. They favored the liberal arts as well as "industrial education," unlike their better-known male contemporaries, W. E. B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington. A lifetime of research in diaries, correspondence, photos, organizational records, newspaper articles and editorials, interviews with former students, and memorials to these pioneers allows McCluskey (African American and African diaspora studies, Indiana Univ.) to paint admiring portraits of indomitable educators and activists who paved the way for the civil rights movement of the mid-20th century. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --Karin Gedge, West Chester University of Pennsylvania

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.