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The Shape of Life : Genes, Development, and the Evolution of Animal Form

By: Raff, Rudolf A.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (545 p.).ISBN: 9780226256573.Subject(s): Behavior genetics | Evolutionary genetics | GeneticsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Shape of Life : Genes, Development, and the Evolution of Animal FormDDC classification: 575.1 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; 1. Over the Ice for Ontogeny and Phylogeny; The worst journey in the world; Old roots and tangled branches; Recapitulation, transformation, and von Baer's laws; Haeckel: Metaphor as mechanism; The embryological strand; The conflict between heredity and development; Rate genes: An attempted synthesis; Ontogeny meets the operon; An almost meeting of the minds; A deep intellectual divide; Issues for an evolutionary developmental biology; 2. Metazoan Phyla and Body Plans; Questions of macroevolution and body plans; Homology and body plan; The living phyla
The need for phylogenyPhylogenetic tools; Outgroups and primitive characters; Cladograms and phylogenetic trees; Diversity and disparity; 3. Deep Time and Metazoan Origins; Deep time; The first animals; Precambrian life and environments; Are the Ediacaran fossils animals at all?; If not animals, what?; Bodies and behaviors on the Cambrian boundary; Small shelly fossils; Unearthing the unimaginable; More body plans, faster evolution?; Evolution and progress; A summary: The importance of the fossils; 4. Molecular Phylogeny: Dissecting the Metazoan Radiation; Inferring molecular phylogenies
Outlining a molecular phylogeny of the phylaThe base of the metazoan radiation; The base of the radiation of the Bilateria; Strange territory: The pseudocoelomates; Origin of the coelom; Coelomate protostomes; Lophophorates; Arthropod monophyly versus polyphyly; Arthropod molecular phylogenies; The disparity of Cambrian arthropods; Deuterostomes; Molecular biology and the metazoan radiation; 5. Recovering Data from the Past; The Crystal Palace dinosaurs; Loss and recovery of data from the past; Interpreting lost body plans; The Neanderthal's missing voice and DNA's forgotten bases
Can our methods recover phylogenies from genes?Gene trees versus species trees; Setting the molecular ""clock""; Extinct lineages affect molecular phylogenies; Fossil genes; Summing up: Phylogeny and the evolution of development; 6. The Developmental Basis of Body Plans; Body plans and developmental biology; Why have no new phyla appeared since the Cambrian?; Mass extinctions and big opportunities; Invasion of the land; Hypotheses on the stability of body plans; Patterns of development in the metazoan radiation; Hox genes and body plans; Evolutionary stability of early development
Radical evolutionary changes in early developmentBody plans and how they develop; Fiddling with the rules; Stability of phylotypic stages; Evolution after the phylotypic stage; The developmental hourglass; 7. Building Similar Animals in Different Ways; The evolutionary significance of early development; Dichotomies and model systems; The limits of model systems; Rules for evolutionary developmental biology; Life history and developmental strategies; Conservation and change in early development; Developmental modes in sea urchins; Radically reorganizing development; Changes in morphogenesis
Similar genes, different embryos
Summary: Rudolf Raff is recognized as a pioneer in evolutionary developmental biology. In their 1983 book, Embryos, Genes, and Evolution, Raff and co-author Thomas Kaufman proposed a synthesis of developmental and evolutionary biology. In The Shape of Life, Raff analyzes the rise of this new experimental discipline and lays out new research questions, hypotheses, and approaches to guide its development.Raff uses the evolution of animal body plans to exemplify the interplay between developmental mechanisms and evolutionary patterns. Animal body plans emerged half a billion years ago. Evolution within th
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Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; 1. Over the Ice for Ontogeny and Phylogeny; The worst journey in the world; Old roots and tangled branches; Recapitulation, transformation, and von Baer's laws; Haeckel: Metaphor as mechanism; The embryological strand; The conflict between heredity and development; Rate genes: An attempted synthesis; Ontogeny meets the operon; An almost meeting of the minds; A deep intellectual divide; Issues for an evolutionary developmental biology; 2. Metazoan Phyla and Body Plans; Questions of macroevolution and body plans; Homology and body plan; The living phyla

The need for phylogenyPhylogenetic tools; Outgroups and primitive characters; Cladograms and phylogenetic trees; Diversity and disparity; 3. Deep Time and Metazoan Origins; Deep time; The first animals; Precambrian life and environments; Are the Ediacaran fossils animals at all?; If not animals, what?; Bodies and behaviors on the Cambrian boundary; Small shelly fossils; Unearthing the unimaginable; More body plans, faster evolution?; Evolution and progress; A summary: The importance of the fossils; 4. Molecular Phylogeny: Dissecting the Metazoan Radiation; Inferring molecular phylogenies

Outlining a molecular phylogeny of the phylaThe base of the metazoan radiation; The base of the radiation of the Bilateria; Strange territory: The pseudocoelomates; Origin of the coelom; Coelomate protostomes; Lophophorates; Arthropod monophyly versus polyphyly; Arthropod molecular phylogenies; The disparity of Cambrian arthropods; Deuterostomes; Molecular biology and the metazoan radiation; 5. Recovering Data from the Past; The Crystal Palace dinosaurs; Loss and recovery of data from the past; Interpreting lost body plans; The Neanderthal's missing voice and DNA's forgotten bases

Can our methods recover phylogenies from genes?Gene trees versus species trees; Setting the molecular ""clock""; Extinct lineages affect molecular phylogenies; Fossil genes; Summing up: Phylogeny and the evolution of development; 6. The Developmental Basis of Body Plans; Body plans and developmental biology; Why have no new phyla appeared since the Cambrian?; Mass extinctions and big opportunities; Invasion of the land; Hypotheses on the stability of body plans; Patterns of development in the metazoan radiation; Hox genes and body plans; Evolutionary stability of early development

Radical evolutionary changes in early developmentBody plans and how they develop; Fiddling with the rules; Stability of phylotypic stages; Evolution after the phylotypic stage; The developmental hourglass; 7. Building Similar Animals in Different Ways; The evolutionary significance of early development; Dichotomies and model systems; The limits of model systems; Rules for evolutionary developmental biology; Life history and developmental strategies; Conservation and change in early development; Developmental modes in sea urchins; Radically reorganizing development; Changes in morphogenesis

Similar genes, different embryos

Rudolf Raff is recognized as a pioneer in evolutionary developmental biology. In their 1983 book, Embryos, Genes, and Evolution, Raff and co-author Thomas Kaufman proposed a synthesis of developmental and evolutionary biology. In The Shape of Life, Raff analyzes the rise of this new experimental discipline and lays out new research questions, hypotheses, and approaches to guide its development.Raff uses the evolution of animal body plans to exemplify the interplay between developmental mechanisms and evolutionary patterns. Animal body plans emerged half a billion years ago. Evolution within th

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

In this book, Raff updates and expands many of the ideas he initially proposed with Thomas C. Kaufman in Embryos, Genes, and Evolution (1983). Here he combines a rich history of the studies that support our current philosophy of evolution with his personal experience in an informative and entertaining fashion, laying the foundation for future questions challenging our thinking on evolution, cladistics, and phylogeny. Clear descriptions and examples from recent advances in molecular biology combine with discussions of model systems and less well-studied organisms to interweave the relationship among development, molecular biology, and evolution. The power, promise, and pitfalls of searching for genetic evidence linked to evolution in the fossil record, using recent advances in molecular biology, are discussed, in addition to genomic comparisons between extant and extinct organisms. Clear illustrations and tables are well placed throughout and truly enhance the ideas presented. The reference section alone makes this work an essential resource for developmental biologists, paleontologists, zoologists, morphologists, molecular biologists, and geneticists. A cornerstone and standard reference for all science libraries. Upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty. K. Crawford St. Mary's College of Maryland

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