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Reclaiming Accountability : Transparency, Executive Power, and the U.S. Constitution

By: Kitrosser, Heidi.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (292 p.).ISBN: 9780226191775.Subject(s): Constitutional law -- United States | Executive power -- United States | Executive privilege (Government information) -- United States | Government accountability -- United States | Transparency in government -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Reclaiming Accountability : Transparency, Executive Power, and the U.S. ConstitutionDDC classification: 342.73/066 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Chapter 1. The Constitutional Law of Government Secrecy; Chapter 2. The Tools and Politics of Constitutional Meaning; Chapter 3. Substantive Accountability and External Checking; Chapter 4. Supremacy Explained and Critiqued; Chapter 5. How Supremacy Undermines Substantive Accountability; Chapter 6. Presidential Supremacy in the Courts; Chapter 7. Substantive Accountability and Internal Checking; Chapter 8. How Unitary Executive Theory Undermines Substantive Accountability; Chapter 9. Where Do We Go from Here?; Notes; Index
Summary: Americans tend to believe in government that is transparent and accountable. Those who govern us work for us, and therefore they must also answer to us. But how do we reconcile calls for greater accountability with the competing need for secrecy, especially in matters of national security? Those two imperatives are usually taken to be antithetical, but Heidi Kitrosser argues convincingly that this is not the case-and that our concern ought to lie not with secrecy, but with the sort of unchecked secrecy that can result from "presidentialism," or constitutional arguments for broad executive cont
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF5050 .K58 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1884240 Available EBL1884240

Contents; Chapter 1. The Constitutional Law of Government Secrecy; Chapter 2. The Tools and Politics of Constitutional Meaning; Chapter 3. Substantive Accountability and External Checking; Chapter 4. Supremacy Explained and Critiqued; Chapter 5. How Supremacy Undermines Substantive Accountability; Chapter 6. Presidential Supremacy in the Courts; Chapter 7. Substantive Accountability and Internal Checking; Chapter 8. How Unitary Executive Theory Undermines Substantive Accountability; Chapter 9. Where Do We Go from Here?; Notes; Index

Americans tend to believe in government that is transparent and accountable. Those who govern us work for us, and therefore they must also answer to us. But how do we reconcile calls for greater accountability with the competing need for secrecy, especially in matters of national security? Those two imperatives are usually taken to be antithetical, but Heidi Kitrosser argues convincingly that this is not the case-and that our concern ought to lie not with secrecy, but with the sort of unchecked secrecy that can result from "presidentialism," or constitutional arguments for broad executive cont

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This book should be considered a must read by anyone interested in presidential power, secrecy, and law. Kitrosser (Univ. of Minnesota Law School) frames her discussion and analysis of the presidency within what she calls a "substantive accountability framework," which is given life through the mechanisms of macro-transparency, accountability tools, and extraordinary prerogative. She provides a rich and thoughtful review of the conceptual origins of presidential power advocacy and the rationale for employing a substantive accountability framework. The bulk of her work describes and analyzes how presidential supremacy manifests itself in external and internal matters. Although Kitrosser does not explicitly address Steven Calabresi and Christopher Yoo's The Unitary Executive (CH, Jan'09, 46-2937) or Eric Posner and Adrian Vermeule's The Executive Unbound (CH, Dec'11, 49-2361), she does well to tackle the presidential supremacy arguments that those books contain. Her conclusions on moving forward (e.g., engaging in public outreach, bridging partisan and ideological divides, using accountability tools, and creating new or modifying existing accountability tools) provide readers with interesting and thought-provoking ways to counter the aggressive and imperious forms of presidential supremacy in action. Summing Up: Essential. General readers, upper-division undergraduate students, and above. --Mitchel A. Sollenberger, University of Michigan-Dearborn

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