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The Settlers' War : The Struggle for the Texas Frontier in the 1860s

By: Michno, Gregory.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Lincoln : Caxton Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (464 p.).ISBN: 9780870045028.Subject(s): Frontier and pioneer life -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Indians of North America -- Wars -- 1815-1875 | Indians of North America -- Wars -- Texas | Pioneers -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Texas -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Settlers' War : The Struggle for the Texas Frontier in the 1860sDDC classification: 976.4/05 | 976.405 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Illustrations; Maps; Preface; Part 1: Before the Bloody Decade; 1 "By Naked Conquest."; 2 "Your Troubles and difficulties will not cease."; Part 2: 1860; 3 "I tried that Virginia back heel on him."; 4 "They Held Their Bibles."; 5 "A drought of such continued severitywas never known before."; 6 "This knife will take off my scalp before I get home."; 7 "Eating twice their own weight in beef."; 8 "Glorious news -Nine scalps taken."; 9 "I am going home to die no more."; 10 "Me Cincee Ann!"; Part 3: 1861; 11 "We will swoop down upon him at night."
12 "He would not killey me."13 "They are afflicted with the disease knownhere as the 'Indian Grab.'"; 14 "One of the most daring and extensiveraids ever known"; 15 "The soldiers did their best, but theIndians generally outwitted them."; Part 4: 1862; 16 They behaved "cowardly and disgracefully."; 17 "Kill all the grown Indiansand take the children prisoners."; 18 "In the dark corner of the Confederacy."; 19 "Friendly and true to the White man for years."; 20 "Stock raisers and herdersfor the benefit of the Indians."; Part 5: 1863; 21 "No army, no means, no system, no order."
22 "I am afraid to live in this country any longer."23 "If you are a prisoner, don't be afraid."; 24 "What is one man's familyto the whole of the Confederacy?"; 25 "We but little dread now of an invasion this winter."; 26 "Too late to pray now, the Devil has come."; Part 6: 1864; 27 "I saw my sister's ghastly look."; 28 "I have never been in a country wherethe people were so perfectly worthless."; 29 "There we found mother's bleached bones."; 30 "Indians are coming; get in the brush!"; 31 "I am astonished at the number of fools in Texas."; Part 7: 1865
32 "He recognized no friendly Indianson the Texas Frontier."33 "Don't let them carry me away!"; 34 "The Booger-Man did it."; 35 "The wounds caused by scalpinggave off such an offensive odor."; 36 "There must be a frontier somewhere."; 37 "They died of too large views."; Part 8: 1866; 38 - "The last time I saw my father, he was running for the creek."; 39 - "They did not yell like white people."; 40 - "I never sent anyone in search."; 41 - "They are Indians-we are gone."; 42 - "Go with him and be a good boy."; 43 - "Someone has killed a maverick here."
44 - "The Indians can be taught that Texas is a part of the U. S."Part 9: 1867; 45 - "When the soldiers got there the Indians got mean."; 46 - "Well, I would call them unfriendly."; 47 - "I regret to have to be laid away in a foreign country."; 48 - "The children cried for milk."; 49 - "The Indians of my agency have remained perfectlyquiet and peaceable."; Part 10: 1868; 50 - "He was scalped and frozen when we found him."; 51 - "This is my poor child's hair!"; 52 - "The savings of all our youthful days was gone."; 53 - "The troops delight in seeing the savages commit theirmurderous deeds."
54 - "Father, you will never come back."
Summary: Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press for Caxton Press During the decades from 1820 to 1870, the American frontier expanded two thousand miles across the trans-Mississippi West. In Texas the frontier line expanded only about two hundred miles. The supposedly irresistible European force met nearly immovable Native American resistance, sparking a brutal struggle for possession of Texas's hills and prairies that continued for decades.During the 1860s, however, the bloodiest decade in the western Indian wars, there were no large-scale battles in Texas between the army and the Indians. Instead, the targets of the Comanches, the Kiowas, and the Apaches were generally the homesteaders out on the Texas frontier, that is, precisely those who should have been on the sidelines. Ironically, it was these noncombatants who bore the brunt of the warfare, suffering far greater losses than the soldiers supposedly there to protect them. It is this story that The Settlers' War tells for the first time.    
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F391 .M63 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=951015 Available EBL951015

Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Illustrations; Maps; Preface; Part 1: Before the Bloody Decade; 1 "By Naked Conquest."; 2 "Your Troubles and difficulties will not cease."; Part 2: 1860; 3 "I tried that Virginia back heel on him."; 4 "They Held Their Bibles."; 5 "A drought of such continued severitywas never known before."; 6 "This knife will take off my scalp before I get home."; 7 "Eating twice their own weight in beef."; 8 "Glorious news -Nine scalps taken."; 9 "I am going home to die no more."; 10 "Me Cincee Ann!"; Part 3: 1861; 11 "We will swoop down upon him at night."

12 "He would not killey me."13 "They are afflicted with the disease knownhere as the 'Indian Grab.'"; 14 "One of the most daring and extensiveraids ever known"; 15 "The soldiers did their best, but theIndians generally outwitted them."; Part 4: 1862; 16 They behaved "cowardly and disgracefully."; 17 "Kill all the grown Indiansand take the children prisoners."; 18 "In the dark corner of the Confederacy."; 19 "Friendly and true to the White man for years."; 20 "Stock raisers and herdersfor the benefit of the Indians."; Part 5: 1863; 21 "No army, no means, no system, no order."

22 "I am afraid to live in this country any longer."23 "If you are a prisoner, don't be afraid."; 24 "What is one man's familyto the whole of the Confederacy?"; 25 "We but little dread now of an invasion this winter."; 26 "Too late to pray now, the Devil has come."; Part 6: 1864; 27 "I saw my sister's ghastly look."; 28 "I have never been in a country wherethe people were so perfectly worthless."; 29 "There we found mother's bleached bones."; 30 "Indians are coming; get in the brush!"; 31 "I am astonished at the number of fools in Texas."; Part 7: 1865

32 "He recognized no friendly Indianson the Texas Frontier."33 "Don't let them carry me away!"; 34 "The Booger-Man did it."; 35 "The wounds caused by scalpinggave off such an offensive odor."; 36 "There must be a frontier somewhere."; 37 "They died of too large views."; Part 8: 1866; 38 - "The last time I saw my father, he was running for the creek."; 39 - "They did not yell like white people."; 40 - "I never sent anyone in search."; 41 - "They are Indians-we are gone."; 42 - "Go with him and be a good boy."; 43 - "Someone has killed a maverick here."

44 - "The Indians can be taught that Texas is a part of the U. S."Part 9: 1867; 45 - "When the soldiers got there the Indians got mean."; 46 - "Well, I would call them unfriendly."; 47 - "I regret to have to be laid away in a foreign country."; 48 - "The children cried for milk."; 49 - "The Indians of my agency have remained perfectlyquiet and peaceable."; Part 10: 1868; 50 - "He was scalped and frozen when we found him."; 51 - "This is my poor child's hair!"; 52 - "The savings of all our youthful days was gone."; 53 - "The troops delight in seeing the savages commit theirmurderous deeds."

54 - "Father, you will never come back."

Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press for Caxton Press During the decades from 1820 to 1870, the American frontier expanded two thousand miles across the trans-Mississippi West. In Texas the frontier line expanded only about two hundred miles. The supposedly irresistible European force met nearly immovable Native American resistance, sparking a brutal struggle for possession of Texas's hills and prairies that continued for decades.During the 1860s, however, the bloodiest decade in the western Indian wars, there were no large-scale battles in Texas between the army and the Indians. Instead, the targets of the Comanches, the Kiowas, and the Apaches were generally the homesteaders out on the Texas frontier, that is, precisely those who should have been on the sidelines. Ironically, it was these noncombatants who bore the brunt of the warfare, suffering far greater losses than the soldiers supposedly there to protect them. It is this story that The Settlers' War tells for the first time.    

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Gregory F. Michno is the son of a USS "Pampanito" crewman. To write this book, he reviewed audio & video tapes, diaries, & letters & interviewed fifty "Pampanito" veterans. <p> 050

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