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The Enigmatic South : Toward Civil War and Its Legacies

By: Hyde, Samuel C., Jr.
Contributor(s): Paskoff, Paul F | Sacher, John M | Walther, Eric H | Childers, Christopher | Nguyen, Julia | Hyde, Sarah | Rable, George.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (254 p.).ISBN: 9780807156957.Subject(s): Secession -- Southern States | Slavery -- Southern States -- History | Southern States -- Civilization -- 1775-1865 | Southern States -- History -- 1775-1865 | Southern States -- Social conditions -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Enigmatic South : Toward Civil War and Its LegaciesDDC classification: 975.03 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
COVER; CONTENTS; FOREWORD; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; PART I: Politics, Education, and Secession; CHAPTER ONE: The Old Republican Constitutional Primer: States Rights After the Missouri Controversy and the Onset of the Politics of Slavery; CHAPTER TWO: Punctuated Progress: Education Developments in the Antebellum Gulf South; CHAPTER THREE: Preaching Disunion: Clergymen in the Louisiana Secession Crisis; PART II: The Diverse Challenges of War; CHAPTER FOUR: Confederate Dilemmas: The Strange Case of Clement L. Vallandigham
CHAPTER FIVE: Rich Man's Fight: Wealth, Privilege, and Military Service in Confederate MississippiCHAPTER SIX: Searching for "Some Plain and Simple Method": Jefferson Davis and Confederate Conscription; PART III: The Legacy of War and Its Memory; CHAPTER SEVEN: Old South, New South: The Strange Career of Pierre Champomier; CHAPTER EIGHT: Continuity Recast: Judge Edward McGehee, Wilkinson County, and the Saga of Bowling Green Plantation; CHAPTER NINE: A Monument of Paper for William Lowndes Yancey: Crafting and Obscuring Historical Memory
AFTERWORD: Contingency and Continuity: William J. Cooper Jr., an AppreciationLIST OF CONTRIBUTORS
Summary: The Enigmatic South brings together leading scholars of the Civil War period to challenge existing perceptions of the advance to secession, the Civil War, and its aftermath. The pioneering research and innovative arguments of these historians bring crucial insights to the study of this era in American history.Christopher Childers, Sarah L. Hyde, and Julia Huston Nguyen consider the ways politics, religion, and education contributed to southern attitudes toward secession in the antebellum period. George C. Rable, Paul F. Paskoff, and John M. Sacher delve into the challenges the Confederate South faced as it sought legitimacy for its cause and military strength for the coming war with the North. Richard Follett, Samuel C. Hyde, Jr., and Eric H. Walther offer new perspectives on the changes the Civil War wrought on the economic and ideological landscape of the South.The essays in The Enigmatic South speak eloquently to previously unconsidered aspects and legacies of the Civil War and make a major contribution to our understanding of the rich history of a conflict whose aftereffects still linger in American culture and memory.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F213 .E535 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1689324 Available EBL1689324

COVER; CONTENTS; FOREWORD; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; PART I: Politics, Education, and Secession; CHAPTER ONE: The Old Republican Constitutional Primer: States Rights After the Missouri Controversy and the Onset of the Politics of Slavery; CHAPTER TWO: Punctuated Progress: Education Developments in the Antebellum Gulf South; CHAPTER THREE: Preaching Disunion: Clergymen in the Louisiana Secession Crisis; PART II: The Diverse Challenges of War; CHAPTER FOUR: Confederate Dilemmas: The Strange Case of Clement L. Vallandigham

CHAPTER FIVE: Rich Man's Fight: Wealth, Privilege, and Military Service in Confederate MississippiCHAPTER SIX: Searching for "Some Plain and Simple Method": Jefferson Davis and Confederate Conscription; PART III: The Legacy of War and Its Memory; CHAPTER SEVEN: Old South, New South: The Strange Career of Pierre Champomier; CHAPTER EIGHT: Continuity Recast: Judge Edward McGehee, Wilkinson County, and the Saga of Bowling Green Plantation; CHAPTER NINE: A Monument of Paper for William Lowndes Yancey: Crafting and Obscuring Historical Memory

AFTERWORD: Contingency and Continuity: William J. Cooper Jr., an AppreciationLIST OF CONTRIBUTORS

The Enigmatic South brings together leading scholars of the Civil War period to challenge existing perceptions of the advance to secession, the Civil War, and its aftermath. The pioneering research and innovative arguments of these historians bring crucial insights to the study of this era in American history.Christopher Childers, Sarah L. Hyde, and Julia Huston Nguyen consider the ways politics, religion, and education contributed to southern attitudes toward secession in the antebellum period. George C. Rable, Paul F. Paskoff, and John M. Sacher delve into the challenges the Confederate South faced as it sought legitimacy for its cause and military strength for the coming war with the North. Richard Follett, Samuel C. Hyde, Jr., and Eric H. Walther offer new perspectives on the changes the Civil War wrought on the economic and ideological landscape of the South.The essays in The Enigmatic South speak eloquently to previously unconsidered aspects and legacies of the Civil War and make a major contribution to our understanding of the rich history of a conflict whose aftereffects still linger in American culture and memory.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Samuel C. Hyde, Jr., is the Leon Ford Professor of History at Southeastern Louisiana University and the author of several books, including Pistols and Politics: The Dilemma of Democracy in Louisiana's Florida Parishes, 1810--1899.</p>

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