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Diplomacy at the Brink : Eisenhower, Churchill, and Eden in the Cold War

By: Watry, David M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (247 p.).ISBN: 9780807157190.Subject(s): Churchill, Winston, 1874-1965 | Cold War -- Diplomatic history | Eden, Anthony, Earl of Avon, 1897-1977 | Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969 | Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1964 | Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- United States | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1953-1961 | United States -- Foreign relations -- Great BritainGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Diplomacy at the Brink : Eisenhower, Churchill, and Eden in the Cold WarDDC classification: 327.73041 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1. INTRODUCTION; 2. CONSERVATIVE IDEOLOGY AND BRINKSMANSHIP; 3. BRINKSMANSHIP AND THE FAR EAST; Illustrations; 4. ATOMIC BRINKSMANSHIP: Korea, Indochina, and Formosa; 5. COVERT BRINKSMANSHIP: Iran and Guatemala; 6. DIPLOMATIC BRINKSMANSHIP: The Suez Crisis; 7. ECONOMIC BRINKSMANSHIP: The Fall of Anthony Eden; 8. CONCLUSION; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: A groundbreaking new study of Anglo-American relations during the Cold War, Diplomacy at the Brink argues for a reevaluation of Dwight D. Eisenhower's foreign policy toward allies and enemies alike. Contrary to his reputation as a level-headed moderate, the Eisenhower who emerges in David M. Watry's exhaustively researched book is a conservative ideologue, a leader whose aggressively anti-Communist and anticolonialist foreign policies represented a major shift away from the containment policy of the Truman presidency. Watry contends that Eisenhower worked closely with John Foster Dulles to engage in aggressive brinksmanship that diametrically opposed Winston Churchill's diplomacy of "peaceful coexistence." At a time when British economic interests favored cooperation with China, Eisenhower planned nuclear war against it; when Anthony Eden considered Gamal Abdel Nasser a Soviet agent and invaded Egypt, Eisenhower supported Arab nationalism and used economic and political blackmail to force Britain to withdraw. Such stances fractured the "special relationship" between America and Great Britain and played a vital role in the dissolution of the British Empire. Watry's thorough examination of the important clash of U.S.-U.K. foreign policy demonstrates that America's new anti-colonial policies and the unilateral use of American power against perceived Communist threats put Eisenhower and Dulles on a collision course with Churchill and Eden that rocked the world.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E183.8 .G7 W277 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1689330 Available EBL1689330

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1. INTRODUCTION; 2. CONSERVATIVE IDEOLOGY AND BRINKSMANSHIP; 3. BRINKSMANSHIP AND THE FAR EAST; Illustrations; 4. ATOMIC BRINKSMANSHIP: Korea, Indochina, and Formosa; 5. COVERT BRINKSMANSHIP: Iran and Guatemala; 6. DIPLOMATIC BRINKSMANSHIP: The Suez Crisis; 7. ECONOMIC BRINKSMANSHIP: The Fall of Anthony Eden; 8. CONCLUSION; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

A groundbreaking new study of Anglo-American relations during the Cold War, Diplomacy at the Brink argues for a reevaluation of Dwight D. Eisenhower's foreign policy toward allies and enemies alike. Contrary to his reputation as a level-headed moderate, the Eisenhower who emerges in David M. Watry's exhaustively researched book is a conservative ideologue, a leader whose aggressively anti-Communist and anticolonialist foreign policies represented a major shift away from the containment policy of the Truman presidency. Watry contends that Eisenhower worked closely with John Foster Dulles to engage in aggressive brinksmanship that diametrically opposed Winston Churchill's diplomacy of "peaceful coexistence." At a time when British economic interests favored cooperation with China, Eisenhower planned nuclear war against it; when Anthony Eden considered Gamal Abdel Nasser a Soviet agent and invaded Egypt, Eisenhower supported Arab nationalism and used economic and political blackmail to force Britain to withdraw. Such stances fractured the "special relationship" between America and Great Britain and played a vital role in the dissolution of the British Empire. Watry's thorough examination of the important clash of U.S.-U.K. foreign policy demonstrates that America's new anti-colonial policies and the unilateral use of American power against perceived Communist threats put Eisenhower and Dulles on a collision course with Churchill and Eden that rocked the world.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this deceptively short book, Watry (Univ. of Texas, Arlington) seemingly attempts the explication of a once-stable Anglo-American relationship while, in fact, arguing against the accepted scholarly thesis of Eisenhower as the "hidden hand president." Through masterful use of transatlantic archives, the author clearly establishes the general as the architect of the ultimate destruction of that special relationship forged during WW II. Readers may expect to find groundbreaking archival evidence of collaboration and mutual support between top diplomats of the US and England against an old ally at the dawn of the Cold War. Rather, Watry brings readers to the brink, not of atomic diplomacy between two divergent superpowers, but across several domains-ideological, atomic, geographic, diplomatic, covert, and economic-between the allies. Taking a clearly revisionist stance, he deftly exposes readers to high-level briefings separated by the Atlantic to cross-connect stovepiped behaviors and personalities at specific points in time correlated to singularly critical diplomatic moments. In so doing, Watry encourages readers to question Eisenhower's Cold War methods and goals, as well as provides the basis of the Empire's decline and the US ascendance. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --Gary Donato, Bentley University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

David M. Watry is a lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Texas at Arlington.

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