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Lone Star Muslims : Transnational Lives and the South Asian Experience in Texas

By: Afzal, Ahmed.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (276 p.).ISBN: 9781479851638.Subject(s): Homosexuality -- Religious aspects -- Islam -- Case studies | Houston (Tex.) -- Ethnic relations -- Case studies | Muslims -- United States -- Social conditions -- 21st century -- Case studies | Muslims in popular culture -- United States -- Case studies | Pakistani Americans -- Texas -- Houston -- Ethnic identity -- Case studies | Pakistani Americans -- Texas -- Houston -- Social conditions -- 21st centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Lone Star Muslims : Transnational Lives and the South Asian Experience in TexasDDC classification: 305.6 | 305.697077641411 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Houston: Race, Class, Oil, and the Making of "America's Most Diverse City"; 2 "A Dream Come True": Shia Ismaili Experiences in Corporate America; 3 "It's Allah's Will": The Transnational Muslim Heritage Economy; 4 "I Have a Very Good Relationship with Allah": Pakistani Gay Men and Transnational Belonging; 5 The Pakistan Independence Day Festival: The Making of a "Houston Tradition"; 6 "Pakistanis Have Always Been Radio People": Transnational Media, Business Imperatives, and Homeland Politics; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D
EG; G; H; I; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; W; Y; Z; About the Author
Summary: Lone Star Muslims offers an engaging and insightful look at contemporary Muslim American life in Texas. It illuminates the dynamics of the Pakistani Muslim community in Houston, a city with one of the largest Muslim populations in the south and southwestern United States.  Drawing on interviews and participant observation at radio stations, festivals, and ethnic businesses, the volume explores everyday Muslim lives at the intersection of race, class, profession, gender, sexuality, and religious sectarian affiliation to demonstrate the complexity of the South Asian experience.  Importantly, the volume incorporates narratives of gay Muslim American men of Pakistani descent, countering the presumed heteronormativity evident in most of the social science scholarship on Muslim Americans and revealing deeply felt affiliations to Islam through ritual and practice. It also includes narratives of members of the highly skilled Shia Ismaili Muslim labor force employed in corporate America, of Pakistani ethnic entrepreneurs, the working class and the working poor employed in Pakistani ethnic businesses, of community activists, and of radio program hosts.    Decentering dominant framings that flatten understandings of transnational Islam and Muslim Americans, such as "terrorist" on the one hand, and "model minority" on the other, Lone Star Muslims offers a glimpse into a variety of lived experiences. It shows how specificities of class, Islamic sectarian affiliation, citizenship status, gender, and sexuality shape transnational identities and mediate racism, marginalities, and abjection.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E184 .M88 A36 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1840315 Available EBL1840315

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Houston: Race, Class, Oil, and the Making of "America's Most Diverse City"; 2 "A Dream Come True": Shia Ismaili Experiences in Corporate America; 3 "It's Allah's Will": The Transnational Muslim Heritage Economy; 4 "I Have a Very Good Relationship with Allah": Pakistani Gay Men and Transnational Belonging; 5 The Pakistan Independence Day Festival: The Making of a "Houston Tradition"; 6 "Pakistanis Have Always Been Radio People": Transnational Media, Business Imperatives, and Homeland Politics; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D

EG; G; H; I; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; W; Y; Z; About the Author

Lone Star Muslims offers an engaging and insightful look at contemporary Muslim American life in Texas. It illuminates the dynamics of the Pakistani Muslim community in Houston, a city with one of the largest Muslim populations in the south and southwestern United States.  Drawing on interviews and participant observation at radio stations, festivals, and ethnic businesses, the volume explores everyday Muslim lives at the intersection of race, class, profession, gender, sexuality, and religious sectarian affiliation to demonstrate the complexity of the South Asian experience.  Importantly, the volume incorporates narratives of gay Muslim American men of Pakistani descent, countering the presumed heteronormativity evident in most of the social science scholarship on Muslim Americans and revealing deeply felt affiliations to Islam through ritual and practice. It also includes narratives of members of the highly skilled Shia Ismaili Muslim labor force employed in corporate America, of Pakistani ethnic entrepreneurs, the working class and the working poor employed in Pakistani ethnic businesses, of community activists, and of radio program hosts.    Decentering dominant framings that flatten understandings of transnational Islam and Muslim Americans, such as "terrorist" on the one hand, and "model minority" on the other, Lone Star Muslims offers a glimpse into a variety of lived experiences. It shows how specificities of class, Islamic sectarian affiliation, citizenship status, gender, and sexuality shape transnational identities and mediate racism, marginalities, and abjection.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this thought-provoking dual treatment of the historical legacy of Texas and the diasporic experience of Ismaili Shi'a and homosexual Muslims living in Houston and its suburbs, Afzal (anthropology, Purchase College, SUNY) argues against the works of scholars presenting the various facets of the South Asian community as a monolith of Islamic practices and heterosexuality. Though the facts of homosexuality and variant Islamic practices are well known, they have not been explored against the larger background of the effects of this contemporary period of globalization, Islamophobia, and issues of cultural belonging. Numbers of South Asians were drawn to oil-producing Houston and its myriad businesses because of climate and educational and employment opportunities. The author asserts that the particular study of Pakistanis and then Ismailis is warranted because Pakistan is one of only two nations created precisely because of religion. What readers learn a great deal about is how a minority religious community with a living guide has negotiated multiple diasporas. The Aga Khan has constantly preached acculturation without community erasure. In some instances, he has called for relinquishing a Pakistani identity for a new, Islamic one. This is new at the forefront of religion. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Most levels/libraries. --Aminah Beverly McCloud, DePaul University

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