Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Caribbean Crossing : African Americans and the Haitian Emigration Movement

By: Fanning, Sara.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (186 p.).ISBN: 9780814770870.Subject(s): African Americans -- Haiti -- History -- 19th century | African Americans -- Migrations -- History -- 19th century | African Americans -- Relations with Haitians -- History -- 19th century | Haiti -- Emigration and immigration -- History -- 19th century | Haiti -- Relations -- United States | Immigrants -- Haiti -- History -- 19th century | United States -- Emigration and immigration -- History -- 19th century | United States -- Race relations -- History -- 19th century | United States -- Relations -- HaitiGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Caribbean Crossing : African Americans and the Haitian Emigration MovementDDC classification: 305.896/07307294 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Migration to Haiti in the Context of Other Contemporary Migrations; 2 Haiti's Founding Fathers; 3 Boyer's Recognition Project; 4 The Marketing of Haiti; 5 Push and Pull in Haitian Emigration; 6 Haitian Realities and the Emigrants' Return; Conclusion; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z; About the Author
Summary: Shortly after winning its independence in 1804, Haiti's leaders realized that if their nation was to survive, it needed to build strong diplomatic bonds with other nations. Haiti's first leaders looked especially hard at the United States, which had a sizeable free black population that included vocal champions of black emigration and colonization. In the 1820s, President Jean-Pierre Boyer helped facilitate a migration of thousands of black Americans to Haiti with promises of ample land, rich commercial prospects, and most importantly, a black state. His ideas struck a chord with both blacks and whites in America. Journalists and black community leaders advertised emigration to Haiti as a way for African Americans to resist discrimination and show the world that the black race could be an equal on the world stage, while antislavery whites sought to support a nation founded by liberated slaves. Black and white businessmen were excited by trade potential, and racist whites viewed Haiti has a way to export the race problem that plagued America. By the end of the decade, black Americans migration to Haiti began to ebb as emigrants realized that the Caribbean republic wasn't the black Eden they'd anticipated. Caribbean Crossing documents the rise and fall of the campaign for black emigration to Haiti, drawing on a variety of archival sources to share the rich voices of the emigrants themselves. Using letters, diary accounts, travelers' reports, newspaper articles, and American, British, and French consulate records, Sara Fanning profiles the emigrants and analyzes the diverse motivations that fueled this unique early moment in both American and Haitian history.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.18 .F36 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1864035 Available EBL1864035

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Migration to Haiti in the Context of Other Contemporary Migrations; 2 Haiti's Founding Fathers; 3 Boyer's Recognition Project; 4 The Marketing of Haiti; 5 Push and Pull in Haitian Emigration; 6 Haitian Realities and the Emigrants' Return; Conclusion; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z; About the Author

Shortly after winning its independence in 1804, Haiti's leaders realized that if their nation was to survive, it needed to build strong diplomatic bonds with other nations. Haiti's first leaders looked especially hard at the United States, which had a sizeable free black population that included vocal champions of black emigration and colonization. In the 1820s, President Jean-Pierre Boyer helped facilitate a migration of thousands of black Americans to Haiti with promises of ample land, rich commercial prospects, and most importantly, a black state. His ideas struck a chord with both blacks and whites in America. Journalists and black community leaders advertised emigration to Haiti as a way for African Americans to resist discrimination and show the world that the black race could be an equal on the world stage, while antislavery whites sought to support a nation founded by liberated slaves. Black and white businessmen were excited by trade potential, and racist whites viewed Haiti has a way to export the race problem that plagued America. By the end of the decade, black Americans migration to Haiti began to ebb as emigrants realized that the Caribbean republic wasn't the black Eden they'd anticipated. Caribbean Crossing documents the rise and fall of the campaign for black emigration to Haiti, drawing on a variety of archival sources to share the rich voices of the emigrants themselves. Using letters, diary accounts, travelers' reports, newspaper articles, and American, British, and French consulate records, Sara Fanning profiles the emigrants and analyzes the diverse motivations that fueled this unique early moment in both American and Haitian history.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The rise and fall of the 1820s campaign for black American emigration to Haiti. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Most Americans know about the "return to Africa" movement among free blacks in the US, which resulted in the formation of a new African nation, the Republic of Liberia, in 1847. Probably far fewer know about the contemporaneous emigration of free blacks from the US to the new republic of Haiti, which arose after a successful slave rebellion against French colonial masters. To African Americans of the early 19th century, Haiti embodied racial equality and freedom from intense, institutionalized racial discrimination and insufferable white supremacy. Fanning (Texas Women's Univ.) provides the first comprehensive account of this forgotten chapter in US and African American history. Led by pastors of black churches and encouraged by Haiti's first president, some 4,000 free US blacks--from Baltimore, Philadelphia, Boston, and the north--took up the challenge and immigrated to Haiti as colonists, settlers, and, in some cases, exiles to farm free land. In the end, they were unable to overcome extreme hardships caused by famine, epidemics, onerous government taxes, and other unfavorable policies, leading to mass desertion of the island. For most African Americans, the movement's failure ended their bid for racial equality in a black nation; for Haitian President Jean-Pierre Boyer, it ended his bid for international recognition. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Evelyn Hu-DeHart, Brown University

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.