Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Red War on the Family : Sex, Gender, and Americanism in the First Red Scare

By: Ryan, Erica J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (234 p.).ISBN: 9781439908860.Subject(s): Americanization -- History -- 20th century | Anti-communist movements -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Communism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Conservatism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Families -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Nationalism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Sex -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Sex role -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Politics and government -- 1919-1933 | United States -- Social conditions -- 1918-1932Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Red War on the Family : Sex, Gender, and Americanism in the First Red ScareDDC classification: 973.91 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Americanism versus Bulshevism: The Red Scare and the Framing of Postwar American Culture; 2. "The Age of Woman in Revolt": Talking about Bolshevism by Talking about Women in Red Scare America, 1919-1923; 3. "Every Homeowner Is a Bulwark of Americanism and a Safeguard against Bolshevism": Constructions of Social Order and Working-Class Masculinity in the Postwar Own-Your-Own-Home Movement; 4. Getting "Personal and Intimate": The Americanization of Immigrant Family and Sexual Values
5. "The Perils Ahead Are Moral, not Economic": Modern Culture, Modern Marriage, and Americanism after 1924Conclusion; Notes; Index
Summary: In the 1920s, cultural and political reactions to the Red Scare in America contributed to a marked shift in the way Americans thought about sexuality, womanhood, manhood, and family life. The Russian Revolution prompted anxious Americans sensing a threat to social order to position heterosexuality, monogamy, and the family as a bulwark against radicalism.   In her probing and engaging book, Red War on the Family, Erica Ryan traces the roots of sexual modernism and the history of antiradicalism and antifeminism. She illuminates how Americans responded to foreign and domestic threats and expressed nationalism by strengthening traditional gender and family roles-especially by imposing them on immigrant groups, workers, women, and young people.   Ryan argues that the environment of political conformity in the 1920s was maintained in part through the quest for cultural and social conformity, exemplified by white, middle-class family life. Red War on the Family charts the ways Americanism both reinforced and was reinforced by these sexual and gender norms in the decades after World War I. 
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E743 | E743.5 .R89 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1866488 Available EBL1866488

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Americanism versus Bulshevism: The Red Scare and the Framing of Postwar American Culture; 2. "The Age of Woman in Revolt": Talking about Bolshevism by Talking about Women in Red Scare America, 1919-1923; 3. "Every Homeowner Is a Bulwark of Americanism and a Safeguard against Bolshevism": Constructions of Social Order and Working-Class Masculinity in the Postwar Own-Your-Own-Home Movement; 4. Getting "Personal and Intimate": The Americanization of Immigrant Family and Sexual Values

5. "The Perils Ahead Are Moral, not Economic": Modern Culture, Modern Marriage, and Americanism after 1924Conclusion; Notes; Index

In the 1920s, cultural and political reactions to the Red Scare in America contributed to a marked shift in the way Americans thought about sexuality, womanhood, manhood, and family life. The Russian Revolution prompted anxious Americans sensing a threat to social order to position heterosexuality, monogamy, and the family as a bulwark against radicalism.   In her probing and engaging book, Red War on the Family, Erica Ryan traces the roots of sexual modernism and the history of antiradicalism and antifeminism. She illuminates how Americans responded to foreign and domestic threats and expressed nationalism by strengthening traditional gender and family roles-especially by imposing them on immigrant groups, workers, women, and young people.   Ryan argues that the environment of political conformity in the 1920s was maintained in part through the quest for cultural and social conformity, exemplified by white, middle-class family life. Red War on the Family charts the ways Americanism both reinforced and was reinforced by these sexual and gender norms in the decades after World War I. 

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In the aftermath of WW I and the Russian Revolution, the US reacted to the tumult of global conflict and the rise of communism with a "Red Scare." Fears of leftist radicalism spiked, and conservatives cast everything from unionization efforts to political dissent as heralding the arrival of "Bolshevism." Ryan (Rider Univ.) argues that this antiradicalism extended beyond politics and economics to the realms of gender, sexuality, and family life. Contrasting Americanism to Bolshevism, antiradicals equated traditional patriarchal families with the "American" way of life and saw any challenges to that system as un-American. Thus, argues Ryan, the Red Scare provided a means of countering the rapid social changes taking place in the late 1910s and 1920s, which included feminism, changing sexual morals, and the rise of companionate marriage. The author has an accessible writing style and convincingly argues her point. The book's nuanced subject matter will enrich research collections and prove most useful to readers at the graduate or faculty level. Summing Up: Recommended. Most useful to readers at the graduate or faculty level. --Susan Ferentinos, independent scholar

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Erica J. Ryan is Assistant Professor of History at Rider University.<br>

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.