Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Cheap on Crime : Recession-Era Politics and the Transformation of American Punishment

By: Aviram, Hadar, Prof.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (267 p.).ISBN: 9780520960329.Subject(s): Corrections -- Economic aspects -- United States | Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States | Prisons -- Economic aspects -- United States | Punishment -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Cheap on Crime : Recession-Era Politics and the Transformation of American PunishmentDDC classification: 364.60973/090511 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Talking about Money and Punishment; 2. A Fiscal History of Mass Incarceration; 3. The Financial Crisis of 2007 and the Birth of Humonetarianism; 4. The New Correctional Discourse of Scarcity: From Ideals to Money on Death Row; 5. The New Coalitions of Financial Prudence: From Tough on Crime to the Drug Truce; 6. The New Carceral Wheeling and Dealing: From Incapacitation to the Inmate Export Business; 7. The New Inmate as a Fiscal Subject: From Ward to Consumer; 8. The Future of Humonetarianism; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D
EF; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y; Z
Summary: After forty years of increasing prison construction and incarceration rates, winds of change are blowing through the American correctional system. The 2008 financial crisis demonstrated the unsustainability of the incarceration project, thereby empowering policy makers to reform punishment through fiscal prudence and austerity. In Cheap on Crime, Hadar Aviram draws on years of archival and journalistic research and builds on social history and economics literature to show the powerful impact of recession-era discourse on the death penalty, the war on drugs, incarceration practices, prison heal
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV9471 .A98 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1711064 Available EBL1711064

Cover; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Talking about Money and Punishment; 2. A Fiscal History of Mass Incarceration; 3. The Financial Crisis of 2007 and the Birth of Humonetarianism; 4. The New Correctional Discourse of Scarcity: From Ideals to Money on Death Row; 5. The New Coalitions of Financial Prudence: From Tough on Crime to the Drug Truce; 6. The New Carceral Wheeling and Dealing: From Incapacitation to the Inmate Export Business; 7. The New Inmate as a Fiscal Subject: From Ward to Consumer; 8. The Future of Humonetarianism; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D

EF; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y; Z

After forty years of increasing prison construction and incarceration rates, winds of change are blowing through the American correctional system. The 2008 financial crisis demonstrated the unsustainability of the incarceration project, thereby empowering policy makers to reform punishment through fiscal prudence and austerity. In Cheap on Crime, Hadar Aviram draws on years of archival and journalistic research and builds on social history and economics literature to show the powerful impact of recession-era discourse on the death penalty, the war on drugs, incarceration practices, prison heal

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Univ. of California law professor Aviram's nuanced humonetarianism analysis has the potential to become a classic in the study of how social context--in particular, times of financial crisis--influences incarceration policies. Her balanced and well-researched critique of the "smart on crime" approach, featuring neoliberalism and the "right on crime" ideological paradigm including aspects of the prison industry complex, illustrates clearly how cutting back out-of-control spending for mass incarceration may unite opposing political interests, but also can be a double-edged sword in terms of protecting human rights. Aviram's review of the social science and legal literature is outstanding, as is her use of four key carceral issues as case studies--death row, war on drugs, privatization, and inmate as consumer--to document the mixed results of financial prudence following the 2007 financial crisis. Moreover, she grounds her contemporary and often California-focused examples within the larger historical and regional experiences of multiple US incarceration forms. When relevant, Aviram adds cross-cultural comparisons to further strengthen her perspective on humonetarianism and its future. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --Karren Baird-Olson, California State University--Northridge

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.