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John Dewey and the Future of Community College Education.

By: Harbour, Clifford P.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2015Description: 1 online resource (193 p.).ISBN: 9781441126092.Subject(s): Community colleges -- United States | Dewey, John, 1859-1952 -- Views on education | Education -- PhilosophyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: John Dewey and the Future of Community College EducationDDC classification: 191 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Preface; Introduction; The President goes to Macomb Community College; The priorities of the federal government; The Completion Agenda; Reclaiming the American Dream; The challenge; The objectives of the book; Qualifications; Why Dewey?; The organization of the book; Part 1 - The context; Chapter 1 The contemporary community college; Introduction; The community college-organization and culture; The community college student population; The community college mission; Community college funding; The Completion Agenda at the community college
The need for a new normative visionThe conventional history; Conclusion; Chapter 2 The community college of the future; Introduction; Income inequality; Technological change and learning analytics; Globalization; The problem of generational equity; Public funding for higher education; Conclusion; Chapter 3 Introducing John Dewey; Introduction; Dewey's early years; The Chicago years; The New York years; Dewey's history of American education; Dewey's view of America; Conclusion; Part 2 - The evolution of the community ­college; Chapter 4 The junior college movement; Introduction
The Chicago junior collegesThe California junior colleges; Floyd Marion McDowell; George F. Zook; Leonard V. Koos; Walter Eells; Conclusion; Chapter 5 The Great Depression and the junior college; Introduction; The adult education movement; The private liberal arts college; The Great Depression; Emergency junior colleges; Arguments for greater federal involvement in higher education; The junior college as the college for adults; Conclusion; Chapter 6 The late twentieth century normative vision; Introduction; World War II; The Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 (the GI Bill)
The Truman Commission ReportThe California Master Plan; Federal legislation promoting the growth and expansion of higher education; Conclusion; Chapter 7 Turning to a new normative vision; Introduction; The student diversion studies; Building communities: A vision for a new century; An era of uncertain public funding for community colleges; Reclaiming the American Dream; Conclusion; Part 3 - Dewey on education, democracy, and community; Chapter 8 The relationship between democracy and education; Introduction; The context for Democracy and Education; Defining democracy
Learning in a democratic communityPreparing people for work in a democratic community; Conclusion; Chapter 9 The Great Society and the Great Community; Introduction; Social divisions and universal education; The role of habits, dispositions, and customs; Lippmann's critique of the American democracy; Creating the Great Community; Conclusion; Chapter 10 Dewey and the Great Depression; Introduction; Living and learning in a corporatized society; Educational barriers to achieving the Great Community; Cultural barriers to achieving the Great Community; Conclusion
Chapter 11 The Deweyan community college
Summary: Today, community colleges enroll 40% of all undergraduates in the United States. In the years ahead, these institutions are expected to serve an even larger share of this student population. However, faced with increasing government pressure to significantly improve student completion rates, many community colleges will be forced to reconsider their traditional commitment to expand educational opportunity. Community colleges, therefore, are at a crossroads. Should they focus on improving student completion rates and divert resources from student recruitment programs? Should they improve comple
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LB2328.15 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1892853 Available EBL1892853

Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Preface; Introduction; The President goes to Macomb Community College; The priorities of the federal government; The Completion Agenda; Reclaiming the American Dream; The challenge; The objectives of the book; Qualifications; Why Dewey?; The organization of the book; Part 1 - The context; Chapter 1 The contemporary community college; Introduction; The community college-organization and culture; The community college student population; The community college mission; Community college funding; The Completion Agenda at the community college

The need for a new normative visionThe conventional history; Conclusion; Chapter 2 The community college of the future; Introduction; Income inequality; Technological change and learning analytics; Globalization; The problem of generational equity; Public funding for higher education; Conclusion; Chapter 3 Introducing John Dewey; Introduction; Dewey's early years; The Chicago years; The New York years; Dewey's history of American education; Dewey's view of America; Conclusion; Part 2 - The evolution of the community ­college; Chapter 4 The junior college movement; Introduction

The Chicago junior collegesThe California junior colleges; Floyd Marion McDowell; George F. Zook; Leonard V. Koos; Walter Eells; Conclusion; Chapter 5 The Great Depression and the junior college; Introduction; The adult education movement; The private liberal arts college; The Great Depression; Emergency junior colleges; Arguments for greater federal involvement in higher education; The junior college as the college for adults; Conclusion; Chapter 6 The late twentieth century normative vision; Introduction; World War II; The Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 (the GI Bill)

The Truman Commission ReportThe California Master Plan; Federal legislation promoting the growth and expansion of higher education; Conclusion; Chapter 7 Turning to a new normative vision; Introduction; The student diversion studies; Building communities: A vision for a new century; An era of uncertain public funding for community colleges; Reclaiming the American Dream; Conclusion; Part 3 - Dewey on education, democracy, and community; Chapter 8 The relationship between democracy and education; Introduction; The context for Democracy and Education; Defining democracy

Learning in a democratic communityPreparing people for work in a democratic community; Conclusion; Chapter 9 The Great Society and the Great Community; Introduction; Social divisions and universal education; The role of habits, dispositions, and customs; Lippmann's critique of the American democracy; Creating the Great Community; Conclusion; Chapter 10 Dewey and the Great Depression; Introduction; Living and learning in a corporatized society; Educational barriers to achieving the Great Community; Cultural barriers to achieving the Great Community; Conclusion

Chapter 11 The Deweyan community college

Today, community colleges enroll 40% of all undergraduates in the United States. In the years ahead, these institutions are expected to serve an even larger share of this student population. However, faced with increasing government pressure to significantly improve student completion rates, many community colleges will be forced to reconsider their traditional commitment to expand educational opportunity. Community colleges, therefore, are at a crossroads. Should they focus on improving student completion rates and divert resources from student recruitment programs? Should they improve comple

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Clifford P. Harbour is Associate Professor in the College of Education at the University of Wyoming, USA and President of the Council for the Study of Community Colleges, USA. He was a community college faculty member and administrator for 14 years.

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