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Practical Guide to the Science and Practice of Afterschool Programming : New Directions for Youth Development, Number 144

By: Mahoney, Joseph L.
Contributor(s): Warner, Gina | Mahoney, Joseph L.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.J-B MHS Single Issue Mental Health Services: Publisher: Somerset : Wiley, 2014Description: 1 online resource (146 p.).ISBN: 9781119049166.Subject(s): After-school programs -- United States | Mahoney, Joseph L., -- editor | Student activities -- United States | Youth development -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Practical Guide to the Science and Practice of Afterschool Programming : New Directions for Youth Development, Number 144DDC classification: 378.007 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
A Practical Guide to the Science and Practice of Afterschool Programming; Contents; Issue Editors' Notes; The development of the afterschool workforce; Foundations and purpose of this volume; Four main ideas; Staff knowledge and competence; Individual development; Program quality; Assessment; Research and practice; Organization of the contents and chapters; Notes; Executive Summary; 1 Using relational developmental systems theory to link program goals, activities, and outcomes: The sample case of the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development; From a theory of change to the study of development
Findings of the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development: An overviewConclusions; Notes; Commentary; 2 Afterschool quality; A consensus on quality; Evidence base; Quality standards; Quality improvement policies; Leading-edge extensions from quality standards; Practical theory; Time; Connections to schools; Social and emotional skills; Conclusions; Notes; Commentary; 3 Moving beyond attendance: Lessons learned from assessing engagement in afterschool contexts; Why is engagement important?; What is engagement?; How is engagement assessed?; Survey methods; Experience sampling methods
Observational measuresWhat features of afterschool programs are essential to engagement?; Relations with staff and peers; Activities; Implications for practice; Notes; Commentary; Notes; 4 Growth-promoting relationships with children and youth; Build warm and supportive emotional connections; Provide developmentally appropriate structure and support; Cultivate and support youth interests and initiative; Scaffold and propel youth through skill development; Conclusions; Notes; Commentary; 5 Behavior management in afterschool settings; Functional behavioral assessment in brief; Functions
Primary components of functional behavioral analysisMethods of functional behavioral analysis; Indirect methods; Direct methods; Additional considerations; Challenges; Concluding comments; Notes; Commentary; 6 Family, school, and community partnerships: Practical strategies for afterschool programs; Background; The growth of the field; Historical and research perspective; School of the 21st Century; What is included in 21C?; 21C guiding principles; Implications for afterschool programs; First, involving families, while it's a challenge, is possible
Second, outreach to the community should include studentsService learning; What are the benefits of having students reach out to the community?; Summary; Notes; Commentary; Notes; 7 Cultural competence in afterschool programs; What is cultural competence?; Designing culturally competent afterschool programs; Tailoring cultural competence to meet local needs; Final thoughts moving forward; Notes; Commentary; Notes; 8 Evaluating afterschool programs; Getting started with evaluation: Developing a theory of change; Developing a logic model; Factors and resources; Activities; Outputs; Outcomes
Impact
Summary: Closing the gap between scientific research on afterschool programming and the practices occurring in these settings is the goal of this volume. Both sources of knowledge are critical to developing the afterschool workforce's ability to provide high-quality programming. On the one hand, this means<br /> afterschool staff should not work with young people until they have been adequately prepared-which includes training in evidence-based practices-and properly supervised. On the other hand, it requires that scientists understand and study those aspects of afterschool programming most relevant to
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
LB2805 .M384 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1896002 Available EBL1896002

A Practical Guide to the Science and Practice of Afterschool Programming; Contents; Issue Editors' Notes; The development of the afterschool workforce; Foundations and purpose of this volume; Four main ideas; Staff knowledge and competence; Individual development; Program quality; Assessment; Research and practice; Organization of the contents and chapters; Notes; Executive Summary; 1 Using relational developmental systems theory to link program goals, activities, and outcomes: The sample case of the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development; From a theory of change to the study of development

Findings of the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development: An overviewConclusions; Notes; Commentary; 2 Afterschool quality; A consensus on quality; Evidence base; Quality standards; Quality improvement policies; Leading-edge extensions from quality standards; Practical theory; Time; Connections to schools; Social and emotional skills; Conclusions; Notes; Commentary; 3 Moving beyond attendance: Lessons learned from assessing engagement in afterschool contexts; Why is engagement important?; What is engagement?; How is engagement assessed?; Survey methods; Experience sampling methods

Observational measuresWhat features of afterschool programs are essential to engagement?; Relations with staff and peers; Activities; Implications for practice; Notes; Commentary; Notes; 4 Growth-promoting relationships with children and youth; Build warm and supportive emotional connections; Provide developmentally appropriate structure and support; Cultivate and support youth interests and initiative; Scaffold and propel youth through skill development; Conclusions; Notes; Commentary; 5 Behavior management in afterschool settings; Functional behavioral assessment in brief; Functions

Primary components of functional behavioral analysisMethods of functional behavioral analysis; Indirect methods; Direct methods; Additional considerations; Challenges; Concluding comments; Notes; Commentary; 6 Family, school, and community partnerships: Practical strategies for afterschool programs; Background; The growth of the field; Historical and research perspective; School of the 21st Century; What is included in 21C?; 21C guiding principles; Implications for afterschool programs; First, involving families, while it's a challenge, is possible

Second, outreach to the community should include studentsService learning; What are the benefits of having students reach out to the community?; Summary; Notes; Commentary; Notes; 7 Cultural competence in afterschool programs; What is cultural competence?; Designing culturally competent afterschool programs; Tailoring cultural competence to meet local needs; Final thoughts moving forward; Notes; Commentary; Notes; 8 Evaluating afterschool programs; Getting started with evaluation: Developing a theory of change; Developing a logic model; Factors and resources; Activities; Outputs; Outcomes

Impact

Closing the gap between scientific research on afterschool programming and the practices occurring in these settings is the goal of this volume. Both sources of knowledge are critical to developing the afterschool workforce's ability to provide high-quality programming. On the one hand, this means<br /> afterschool staff should not work with young people until they have been adequately prepared-which includes training in evidence-based practices-and properly supervised. On the other hand, it requires that scientists understand and study those aspects of afterschool programming most relevant to

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Volume Editors:<br> Joseph L. Mahoney is a professor of psychology at Elizabethtown College.<br> Gina Warner is the executive director of the National AfterSchool Association.<br> <br> Series Editor-in-Chief:<br> Gil G. Noam, Harvard University and McLean Hospital

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