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The Sequential Intercept Model and Criminal Justice.

By: Griffin, Patricia A.
Contributor(s): Heilbrun, Kirk | Mulvey, Edward P.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (321 p.).ISBN: 9780190234218.Subject(s): Alternatives to imprisonment -- United States | Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States | Criminals -- Mental health -- United States | Mentally ill offenders -- United States | People with mental disabilities and crime -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Sequential Intercept Model and Criminal Justice: Promoting Community Alternatives for Individuals with Serious Mental IllnessDDC classification: 364.3/80973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; The Sequential Intercept Model and Criminal JusticePromoting Community Alternatives for Individuals with Serious Mental Illness; Copyright; Contents; About the Editors; Contributors; 1 The Movement Toward Community-Based Alternatives to Criminal Justice Involvement and Incarceration for People with Severe Mental Illness; 2 Development of the Sequential Intercept Model: The Search for a Conceptual Model; 3 Law Enforcement and Emergency Services; 4 Initial Detention and Initial Hearings: Intercept 2; 5 Intercept 3: Jails and Courts; 6 Intercept 4: Reentry from Jails and Prisons
7 Applying the Sequential Intercept Model to Reduce Recidivism Among Probationers and Parolees with Mental Illness8 From Resource Center to Systems Change: The GAINS Model; 9 Using the Consensus Project Report to Plan for System Change; 10 State-Level Dissemination and Promotion Initiatives: Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, Ohio, and Pennsylvania; 11 Rethinking Mental Health Legal Policy and Practice: History and Needed Reforms; 12 The Sequential Intercept Model as a Platform for Data-Driven Practice and Policy; 13 Using the Sequential Intercept Model in Cross-Systems Mapping
14 Sequential Intercept Mapping, Confidentiality, and the Cross-System Sharing of Health-Related Information15 The Sequential Intercept Model: Current Status, Future Directions; Index
Summary: The number of individuals with severe mental illness in the criminal justice system is shockingly high. However, there is a wealth of research that shows that the traditional incarceration model is not effective with this population, and that many of these individuals can be helped in the community at less cost without increased risk to public safety by addressing their risk-relevant needs and improving their opportunities for recovery. As a result, during the last decade there has been an increasing interest in community-based alternatives to incarceration for individuals with severe mental i
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV6133 .S39 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1910129 Available EBL1910129

Cover; The Sequential Intercept Model and Criminal JusticePromoting Community Alternatives for Individuals with Serious Mental Illness; Copyright; Contents; About the Editors; Contributors; 1 The Movement Toward Community-Based Alternatives to Criminal Justice Involvement and Incarceration for People with Severe Mental Illness; 2 Development of the Sequential Intercept Model: The Search for a Conceptual Model; 3 Law Enforcement and Emergency Services; 4 Initial Detention and Initial Hearings: Intercept 2; 5 Intercept 3: Jails and Courts; 6 Intercept 4: Reentry from Jails and Prisons

7 Applying the Sequential Intercept Model to Reduce Recidivism Among Probationers and Parolees with Mental Illness8 From Resource Center to Systems Change: The GAINS Model; 9 Using the Consensus Project Report to Plan for System Change; 10 State-Level Dissemination and Promotion Initiatives: Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, Ohio, and Pennsylvania; 11 Rethinking Mental Health Legal Policy and Practice: History and Needed Reforms; 12 The Sequential Intercept Model as a Platform for Data-Driven Practice and Policy; 13 Using the Sequential Intercept Model in Cross-Systems Mapping

14 Sequential Intercept Mapping, Confidentiality, and the Cross-System Sharing of Health-Related Information15 The Sequential Intercept Model: Current Status, Future Directions; Index

The number of individuals with severe mental illness in the criminal justice system is shockingly high. However, there is a wealth of research that shows that the traditional incarceration model is not effective with this population, and that many of these individuals can be helped in the community at less cost without increased risk to public safety by addressing their risk-relevant needs and improving their opportunities for recovery. As a result, during the last decade there has been an increasing interest in community-based alternatives to incarceration for individuals with severe mental i

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Patricia A. Griffin, PhD, is an independent consultant who is also associated with the Pennsylvania Mental Health and Justice Center of Excellence, SAMHSA's GAINS Center for Behavioral Health and Justice Transformation, and Policy Research Associates. Her training is in community psychology. Her scholarly and practice interests include diversion, specialized training of first responders, and provision of services to justice-involved individuals with behavioral health disorders. She is a co-developer of the Sequential Intercept Model.Kirk Heilbrun, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Drexel University and Co-Director of the Pennsylvania Mental Health and Justice Center of Excellence. His research and professional interests include risk assessment and management, forensic assessment, and diversion.Edward P. Mulvey, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and Co-Director of the Pennsylvania Mental Health and Justice Center of Excellence. His research interests include violence and mental illness, prediction of violence and crime, juvenile offenders and the juvenile justice system, and criminal justice policy. He is also interested in public agencies serving justice-involved individuals with mental health problems.David DeMatteo, JD, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Law at Drexel University, where he is also Director of the JD/PhD Program in Law and Psychology, and a consultant with the Pennsylvania Mental Health and Justice Center of Excellence. His research interests include psychopathy, forensic mental health assessment, drug policy, and diversion.Carol A. Schubert, MPH, is a researcher with the Law and Psychiatry Program at the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and a consultant to the Pennsylvania Mental Health and Justice Center of Excellence. Her research interests include violence risk and service provision; she has coordinated numerous large research projects focusing on these areas with justice-involved adults and adolescents.

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