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Light in Germany : Scenes from an Unknown Enlightenment

By: Reed, T. J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (299 p.).ISBN: 9780226205243.Subject(s): Cosmopolitanism -- Germany -- History -- 18th century | Enlightenment -- Germany | Germany -- Intellectual life -- 18th century | Germany -- Social life and customs -- 18th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Light in Germany : Scenes from an Unknown EnlightenmentDDC classification: 943.05 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; References, Translations, and Usage; Introduction: . . . or Darkness?; 1. Coming of Age: The Primal Scene; 2. A World of Our Own: An Epistemology for Action; 3. Hope in History: Making the Past Serve the Future; 4. Talking to Tyrants: Pens against Power; 5. Cosmopolitan Quandaries: Among Savages, Far and Near; 6. The Empty Heavens: From Dogma to Ethics; 7. Apples and After: The Gravity of Science; 8. Good Guardianship: Light through Education; 9. Communication and Beyond: Means or End?; 10. The Full Earth: A Lyrical Enlightenment
11. Peace in Whose Time? : The Ultimate PrizeA Conclusion? : Toward Enlightenment; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Germany's political and cultural past from ancient times through World War II has dimmed the legacy of its Enlightenment, which these days is far outshone by those of France and Scotland. In this book, Jim Reed clears the dust away from eighteenth-century Germany, bringing the likes of Kant, Goethe, Friedrich Schiller, and Gotthold Lessing into a coherent and focused beam that shines within European intellectual history and reasserts the important role of Germany's Enlightenment.             Reed looks closely at the arguments, achievements, conflicts, and controversies of these major thinkers
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DD66 .R38 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1921165 Available EBL1921165

Contents; Preface; References, Translations, and Usage; Introduction: . . . or Darkness?; 1. Coming of Age: The Primal Scene; 2. A World of Our Own: An Epistemology for Action; 3. Hope in History: Making the Past Serve the Future; 4. Talking to Tyrants: Pens against Power; 5. Cosmopolitan Quandaries: Among Savages, Far and Near; 6. The Empty Heavens: From Dogma to Ethics; 7. Apples and After: The Gravity of Science; 8. Good Guardianship: Light through Education; 9. Communication and Beyond: Means or End?; 10. The Full Earth: A Lyrical Enlightenment

11. Peace in Whose Time? : The Ultimate PrizeA Conclusion? : Toward Enlightenment; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Germany's political and cultural past from ancient times through World War II has dimmed the legacy of its Enlightenment, which these days is far outshone by those of France and Scotland. In this book, Jim Reed clears the dust away from eighteenth-century Germany, bringing the likes of Kant, Goethe, Friedrich Schiller, and Gotthold Lessing into a coherent and focused beam that shines within European intellectual history and reasserts the important role of Germany's Enlightenment.             Reed looks closely at the arguments, achievements, conflicts, and controversies of these major thinkers

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In beautifully formulated language, Reed (emer., Queen's College, Oxford Univ., UK), a distinguished scholar, expands on definitions of literature and culture in 18th-century Germany. Using Kant's essay "What Is Enlightenment?" (1784), enriched by many other references, Reed offers a well-documented argument for wider acceptance of the idea that German contributions to this crucial decade are more rational than previously noted. Dealing with epistemology, history, politics, religion, cosmopolitanism, education, and more, the author offers new views of both canonical and neglected texts by authors such as Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller while affirming their groundbreaking influence on European style and thought. The book comprises 11 chapters, and particularly interesting is chapter 10, "The Full Earth: A Lyrical Enlightenment." Reed analyzes poetry such as Goethe's free verse as it relates to reason as well as emotion. Other arresting chapters include one on science, with an interesting discussion of Goethe's often-neglected and misunderstood color theory, and one on communication through learned journals, which argues for the merit of such unrecognized authors as Christoph Friedrich Nicolai. Including fine notes, this accessible, original study of a much-studied era will be meaningful reading for everyone interested in the 18th century. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Erlis Wickersham, emerita, Rosemont College

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