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Brain on fire : my month of madness / Susannah Cahalan.

By: Cahalan, Susannah.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, 2013Edition: 1st Simon & Schuster trade pbk. ed.Description: xiv, 266 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1451621388; 9781451621389.Subject(s): Cahalan, Susannah -- Health | Cahalan, Susannah -- Mental health | Encephalitis -- Patients -- United States -- Biography | Autoimmune diseases -- Patients -- United States -- Biography | Frontal lobes -- Diseases -- Patients -- United States -- Biography | Limbic system -- Diseases -- Patients -- United States -- Biography | Diagnostic errors -- United States -- Case studiesDDC classification: 616.8/320092
Contents:
pt. 1. Crazy -- pt. 2. The clock -- pt. 3. In search of lost time.
Summary: One day in 2009, twenty-four-old Susannah Cahalan woke up alone in a strange hospital room, strapped to her bed, under guard, and unable to move or speak. A wristband marked her as a "flight risk," and her medical records, chronicling a monthlong hospital stay of which she had no memory at all, showed hallucinations, violence, and dangerous instability. Only weeks earlier, Susannah had been on the threshold of a new, adult life, a healthy, ambitious college grad a few months into her first serious relationship and a promising career as a cub reporter at a major New York newspaper. Who was the stranger who had taken over her body? What was happening to her mind? In this narrative, Susannah tells the astonishing true story of her inexplicable descent into madness and the lifesaving diagnosis that nearly didn't happen. A team of doctors would spend a month, and more than a million dollars, trying desperately to pin down a medical explanation for what had gone wrong. Meanwhile, as the days passed and her family, boyfriend, and friends helplessly stood watch by her bed, she began to move inexorably through psychosis into catatonia and, ultimately, toward death. Yet even as this period nearly tore her family apart, it offered an extraordinary testament to their faith in Susannah and their refusal to let her go. Then, neurologist Souhel Najjar joined her team and, with he help of a lucky, ingenious test, saved her life. He recognized the symptoms of a newly discovered autoimmune disorder in which the body attacks th brain, a disease now thought to be tied to both schizophrenia and autism, and perhaps the root of "demonic possessions" throughout history. This story is the powerful account of one woman's struggle to recapture her identity and to rediscover herself among the fragments left behind. Using all her considerable journalistic skills, and building from hospital records and surveillance video, interviews with family and friends, and excerpts from the deeply moving journal her father kept during her illness, Susannah pieces together the story of her "lost month" to write an unforgettable memoir about memory and identity, faith and love.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
RC390 .C24 2013 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002070837
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
RC341 .T442 2008 Textbook of clinical neuropsychology / RC359 .O36 2005 Fractured minds : RC388.5 .T387 2009 My stroke of insight : RC390 .C24 2013 Brain on fire : RC394.A75 A67 1984 Apraxia of speech : RC394.C7 K66 2018 Concussion : RC437 .C66 1977 A Concise encyclopaedia of psychiatry /

"With a new afterword"--Cover.

Includes bibliographical references.

pt. 1. Crazy -- pt. 2. The clock -- pt. 3. In search of lost time.

One day in 2009, twenty-four-old Susannah Cahalan woke up alone in a strange hospital room, strapped to her bed, under guard, and unable to move or speak. A wristband marked her as a "flight risk," and her medical records, chronicling a monthlong hospital stay of which she had no memory at all, showed hallucinations, violence, and dangerous instability. Only weeks earlier, Susannah had been on the threshold of a new, adult life, a healthy, ambitious college grad a few months into her first serious relationship and a promising career as a cub reporter at a major New York newspaper. Who was the stranger who had taken over her body? What was happening to her mind? In this narrative, Susannah tells the astonishing true story of her inexplicable descent into madness and the lifesaving diagnosis that nearly didn't happen. A team of doctors would spend a month, and more than a million dollars, trying desperately to pin down a medical explanation for what had gone wrong. Meanwhile, as the days passed and her family, boyfriend, and friends helplessly stood watch by her bed, she began to move inexorably through psychosis into catatonia and, ultimately, toward death. Yet even as this period nearly tore her family apart, it offered an extraordinary testament to their faith in Susannah and their refusal to let her go. Then, neurologist Souhel Najjar joined her team and, with he help of a lucky, ingenious test, saved her life. He recognized the symptoms of a newly discovered autoimmune disorder in which the body attacks th brain, a disease now thought to be tied to both schizophrenia and autism, and perhaps the root of "demonic possessions" throughout history. This story is the powerful account of one woman's struggle to recapture her identity and to rediscover herself among the fragments left behind. Using all her considerable journalistic skills, and building from hospital records and surveillance video, interviews with family and friends, and excerpts from the deeply moving journal her father kept during her illness, Susannah pieces together the story of her "lost month" to write an unforgettable memoir about memory and identity, faith and love.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

A New York Post reporter whose work has also has been featured in the New York Times, Cahalan, at age 24, seemed launched into life; she was building a successful career as a journalist, had met a man with whom she shared common interests, and seemed perfectly healthy. Until, that is, she woke up in a hospital with no memory of going there or of the previous month. She created this memoir using her father's journal, her medical records, and interviews with family and friends. The book is interesting as a work of reconstructive journalism and as a record of methods the doctors tried and failed to use on her behalf. The author's own reading adds authenticity and poignancy. VERDICT For those interested in medical memoirs. ["Cahalan's hip writing style, sympathetic characters, and suspenseful story will appeal to fans of medical thrillers and the television show House," read the review of the New York Times best-selling Free Pr: S. & S. hc, LJ 11/1/12.-Ed.]-Pam Kingsbury, Univ. of North Alabama, Florence (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Susannah Cahalan has been an investigative reporter at the New York Post for the past ten years. Her work has also been featured in The New York Times, Scientific American, and Glamour UK. She received the Silurian Award of Excellence in Journalism for Feature Writing for the article "The Month of Madness," on which this book is based.

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