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Creative Writing in the Digital Age : Theory, Practice, and Pedagogy

By: Clark, Michael Dean.
Contributor(s): Clark, Michael Dean | Hergenrader, Trent | Rein, Joseph.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: London : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2015Description: 1 online resource (209 p.).ISBN: 9781472574107.Subject(s): EDUCATION / Computers & Technology | EDUCATION / Teaching Methods & Materials / Reading & Phonics | English language--Composition and exercises--Study and teaching (Secondary)--Computer-assisted instruction | Internet in education | LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Composition & Creative Writing | LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / LiteracyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Creative Writing in the Digital Age : Theory, Practice, and PedagogyDDC classification: 428.0071 | 428.0071/2 LOC classification: LB1631.3Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; HalfTitle; Series; Title; Copyright; Contents; 1 Introduction; Section one Digital influences on creative writing studies; 2 Creative writing in the age of synapses; Making the change; Creative writing and synapses; Finally, teaching synaptically; 3 Screening subjects: ; The "Big T" text and the "little t" text; Language as technology; Medial ecologies and subject positions; Subjecting history to student authority; 4 Concentration, form, and ways of (digitally) seeing; The dangers of going digital; Matching digital projects to the goals of creative writing pedagogy
Blogging in creative writing coursesThe Prezi portfolio; Creative writing: From course to curriculum in digital humanities; 5 Game spaces: Videogames as story-generating systems for creative writers; Games and leveraged learning; Possibility spaces: Games as story-generating systems; Videogames in the creative writing classroom; Brave new worlds in creative writing?; 6 The marketable creative: ; From there to here; The hybrid platform in specific; Phase One-Plan; Phase Two-Produce; Phase Three-Prepare; Final note-Why approach fiction instruction this way?
7 Two creative writers look askance at digital composition (crayon on paper)One; Two; Three; Section two Using digital tools as creative practice; 8 Lost in digital translation: Navigating the online creative writing classroom; On collaboration and the workshop; On feedback; On the digital persona; Conclusion; 9 Giving an account of oneself: Teaching identity construction and authorship in creative nonfiction and social media; Find your voices; Aesthetic requirements of the author-self; The interplay of online and print texts in constructing an author-self; Heteroglossic self; Conclusion
10 Reconsidering the online writing workshop with #25wordstory#25wordstory assignment; #25wordstory workshopping; 11 Writing with machines: Data and process in Taroko Gorge; Data and process in programming and poetry; Inside Taroko Gorge; Writing with Taroko Gorge; 12 Telling stories with maps and rules: ; A beautiful precision of language; IF and Inform 7; Strategies for character-driven interactive stories; Successes; Challenges and strategies; 13 Acting out: Netprov in the classroom; Characteristics of Netprov; The historical moment when nonfiction begins to be fictionalized
Writing roles in netprovCollaboration and performance; Timing; Generative constraints; Netprov: In- or out-of-classroom activity?; Prompt examples from Last Five Days of Sight and Sound; Day 1: All is Rosy; Challenge: (at least one tweet); Day 3; Day 6; Reflections; 140 Characters: The Harshest constraint of all; Netprov and evolutionary orthography; Netprov best practices; 14 The text is where it's at: ; Exercises that utilize digital media to teach creative writing lessons; The final step: Teaching editing through digital storytelling; Final thoughts; 15 Creative writing for new media
Author biographies
Summary: Creative Writing in the Digital Age explores the vast array of opportunities that technology provides the Creative Writing teacher, ranging from effective online workshop models to methods that blur the boundaries of genre. From social media tools such as Twitter and Facebook to more advanced software like Inform 7, the book investigates the benefits and potential challenges these technologies present instructors in the classroom. Written with the everyday instructor in mind, the book includes practical classroom lessons that can be easily adapted to creative writing courses regardless of the
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LB1631.3 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1840031 Available EBL1840031

Cover; HalfTitle; Series; Title; Copyright; Contents; 1 Introduction; Section one Digital influences on creative writing studies; 2 Creative writing in the age of synapses; Making the change; Creative writing and synapses; Finally, teaching synaptically; 3 Screening subjects: ; The "Big T" text and the "little t" text; Language as technology; Medial ecologies and subject positions; Subjecting history to student authority; 4 Concentration, form, and ways of (digitally) seeing; The dangers of going digital; Matching digital projects to the goals of creative writing pedagogy

Blogging in creative writing coursesThe Prezi portfolio; Creative writing: From course to curriculum in digital humanities; 5 Game spaces: Videogames as story-generating systems for creative writers; Games and leveraged learning; Possibility spaces: Games as story-generating systems; Videogames in the creative writing classroom; Brave new worlds in creative writing?; 6 The marketable creative: ; From there to here; The hybrid platform in specific; Phase One-Plan; Phase Two-Produce; Phase Three-Prepare; Final note-Why approach fiction instruction this way?

7 Two creative writers look askance at digital composition (crayon on paper)One; Two; Three; Section two Using digital tools as creative practice; 8 Lost in digital translation: Navigating the online creative writing classroom; On collaboration and the workshop; On feedback; On the digital persona; Conclusion; 9 Giving an account of oneself: Teaching identity construction and authorship in creative nonfiction and social media; Find your voices; Aesthetic requirements of the author-self; The interplay of online and print texts in constructing an author-self; Heteroglossic self; Conclusion

10 Reconsidering the online writing workshop with #25wordstory#25wordstory assignment; #25wordstory workshopping; 11 Writing with machines: Data and process in Taroko Gorge; Data and process in programming and poetry; Inside Taroko Gorge; Writing with Taroko Gorge; 12 Telling stories with maps and rules: ; A beautiful precision of language; IF and Inform 7; Strategies for character-driven interactive stories; Successes; Challenges and strategies; 13 Acting out: Netprov in the classroom; Characteristics of Netprov; The historical moment when nonfiction begins to be fictionalized

Writing roles in netprovCollaboration and performance; Timing; Generative constraints; Netprov: In- or out-of-classroom activity?; Prompt examples from Last Five Days of Sight and Sound; Day 1: All is Rosy; Challenge: (at least one tweet); Day 3; Day 6; Reflections; 140 Characters: The Harshest constraint of all; Netprov and evolutionary orthography; Netprov best practices; 14 The text is where it's at: ; Exercises that utilize digital media to teach creative writing lessons; The final step: Teaching editing through digital storytelling; Final thoughts; 15 Creative writing for new media

Author biographies

Creative Writing in the Digital Age explores the vast array of opportunities that technology provides the Creative Writing teacher, ranging from effective online workshop models to methods that blur the boundaries of genre. From social media tools such as Twitter and Facebook to more advanced software like Inform 7, the book investigates the benefits and potential challenges these technologies present instructors in the classroom. Written with the everyday instructor in mind, the book includes practical classroom lessons that can be easily adapted to creative writing courses regardless of the

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael Dean Clark is Associate Professor of Writing at Azusa Pacific University, USA. Formerly an award-winning journalist, he is an author of fiction and nonfiction focused on loss, grace, and uncommon redemption. His fiction and nonfiction work has appeared in Fast Forward, Relief, Coach's Midnight Diner , and elsewhere. Trent Hergenrader is Assistant Professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology, USA. His academic research connects game-based learning and writing instruction, and his short fiction has appeared in such places as Fantasy & Science Fiction and Best Horror of the Year #1 . Joseph Rein is Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, USA. His creative and critical work has appeared in such publications as The Pinch Literary Journal, Laurel Review and New Writing, and he is co-editor of the book Dispatches from the Classroom: Graduate Students on Creative Writing (2011).

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