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Forgotten Citizens.

By: Zayas, Luis.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (289 p.).ISBN: 9780190211134.Subject(s): Children of illegal aliens -- Law and legislation -- United States | Children of illegal aliens -- United States | Illegal alien children -- Government policy -- United States | United States -- Emigration and immigration -- Social aspectsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Forgotten Citizens: Deportation, Children, and the Making of American Exiles and OrphansDDC classification: 362.870830973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Forgotten Citizens; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; A Note on Names and Terms; Preface; 1. Keeping Silence; 2. Migrating for Life's Sake; 3. Immigration Wars; 4. The Lives of Citizen-Children; 5. Rules and Responsibility, Guilt and Shame; 6. Arrest and Detention, and the Aftermath; 7. Fighting to Preserve a Life; 8. Losing the Challenge; 9. Exiles and the Limits of Citizenship; 10. Human Loss and Becoming Deportation Orphans; 11. Our Common Future; Acknowledgments; Appendix A: Research Project: Exploring the Effects of Parental Deportation on US Citizen-Children
Appendix B: Cancellation of Removal Cases: Practical Information for Mental Health Clinicians (with Luis H. Zayas and Mollie Bradlee)References; About the Poet: Kane Smego; Credits; Index
Summary: The United States Constitution insures that all persons born in the US are citizens with equal protection under the law. But in today's America, the US-born children of undocumented immigrants--over four million of them--do not enjoy fully the benefits of citizenship or of feeling that they belong. Children in mixed-status families are forgotten in the loud and discordant immigration debate. They live under the constant threat that their parents will suddenly be deported. Their parents face impossible decisions: make their children exiles or make them orphans. In Forgotten Citizens, Luis Zayas
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Cover; Forgotten Citizens; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; A Note on Names and Terms; Preface; 1. Keeping Silence; 2. Migrating for Life's Sake; 3. Immigration Wars; 4. The Lives of Citizen-Children; 5. Rules and Responsibility, Guilt and Shame; 6. Arrest and Detention, and the Aftermath; 7. Fighting to Preserve a Life; 8. Losing the Challenge; 9. Exiles and the Limits of Citizenship; 10. Human Loss and Becoming Deportation Orphans; 11. Our Common Future; Acknowledgments; Appendix A: Research Project: Exploring the Effects of Parental Deportation on US Citizen-Children

Appendix B: Cancellation of Removal Cases: Practical Information for Mental Health Clinicians (with Luis H. Zayas and Mollie Bradlee)References; About the Poet: Kane Smego; Credits; Index

The United States Constitution insures that all persons born in the US are citizens with equal protection under the law. But in today's America, the US-born children of undocumented immigrants--over four million of them--do not enjoy fully the benefits of citizenship or of feeling that they belong. Children in mixed-status families are forgotten in the loud and discordant immigration debate. They live under the constant threat that their parents will suddenly be deported. Their parents face impossible decisions: make their children exiles or make them orphans. In Forgotten Citizens, Luis Zayas

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Zayas (dean, Sch. of Social Work, Univ. of Texas at Austin; Latinas Attempting Suicide) explores the world of "citizen-children," a population at the center of the current immigration debate. These individuals are U.S. citizens with full constitutional rights, yet their parents are not as they migrated to the United States without documentation and are classified as undocumented immigrants. The goals of Zayas's latest work are threefold: to paint a picture of the lives of citizen-children and the mixed status of their families, to illuminate the social and psychological experiences of this distinct population, and to propose immigration policy reform for children. The author includes experiences of citizen-children with "impersonal laws and insensitive enforcement" to provoke a holistic debate about immigrants and immigration policy. As a trained social worker and academic, Zayas combines research data and personal testimonials to strengthen his argument. Each chapter contains a balance of theory and anecdotes to illustrate how policy cannot be based solely on numbers but must also take into account the consequence the program will have on a person or a family. VERDICT A well-written book that immigrant scholars, policy-makers, and advocates will appreciate for its valuable research and storytelling.-Susan E. Montgomery, Rollins Coll., Olin Lib., Winter Park, FL. © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Luis Zayas, PhD, is Dean of the School of Social Work at the University of Texas at Austin and the Robert Lee Sutherland Chair in Mental Health and Social Policy. He is the author of Latinas Attempting Suicide: When Cultures, Families, and Daughters Collide.

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