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Untrodden Ground : How Presidents Interpret the Constitution

By: Bruff, Harold H.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (566 p.).ISBN: 9780226211244.Subject(s): Executive power -- United States -- History | Implied powers (Constitutional law) -- United States -- History | Presidents -- United States -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Untrodden Ground : How Presidents Interpret the ConstitutionDDC classification: 342.7302/9 | 342.73029 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Introduction: Only a Necessity; Part I. Durable Consequences; Chapter 1. Responsibility: The Constitution; Chapter 2. Summoned by My Country: Washington and Adams; Chapter 3. The Fugitive Occurrence: Jefferson and Madison; Part II. A New Nation; Chapter 4. Independent of Both: Jackson, Tyler, and Polk; Chapter 5. A Rough Time of It: Lincoln; Chapter 6. Unmindful of the High Duties: Andrew Johnson; Part III. Steward of the People; Chapter 7. Facing the Lions: McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, and Wilson; Chapter 8. What Must Be Done: Franklin Roosevelt; Part IV. One Single Man
Chapter 9. Going to Hell: Truman and EisenhowerChapter 10. Bear Any Burden: Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson; Chapter 11. Not Illegal: Nixon, Ford, and Carter; Part V. A New Era; Chapter 12. First a Dream: Reagan; Chapter 13. The Vision Thing: George H. W. Bush and Clinton; Part VI. Deciders; Chapter 14. No Equivocation: George W. Bush; Chapter 15. The Last Mile: Obama; Conclusion: The Stream of History; Acknowledgments; Notes; Index
Summary: When Thomas Jefferson struck a deal for the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, he knew he was adding a new national power to those specified in the Constitution, but he also believed his actions were in the nation's best interest. His successors would follow his example, setting their own constitutional precedents. Tracing the evolution and expansion of the president's formal power, Untrodden Ground reveals the president to be the nation's most important law interpreter and examines how our commanders-in-chief have shaped the law through their responses to important issues of their time.           Re
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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JK511 .B78 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1982582 Available EBL1982582

Contents; Introduction: Only a Necessity; Part I. Durable Consequences; Chapter 1. Responsibility: The Constitution; Chapter 2. Summoned by My Country: Washington and Adams; Chapter 3. The Fugitive Occurrence: Jefferson and Madison; Part II. A New Nation; Chapter 4. Independent of Both: Jackson, Tyler, and Polk; Chapter 5. A Rough Time of It: Lincoln; Chapter 6. Unmindful of the High Duties: Andrew Johnson; Part III. Steward of the People; Chapter 7. Facing the Lions: McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, and Wilson; Chapter 8. What Must Be Done: Franklin Roosevelt; Part IV. One Single Man

Chapter 9. Going to Hell: Truman and EisenhowerChapter 10. Bear Any Burden: Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson; Chapter 11. Not Illegal: Nixon, Ford, and Carter; Part V. A New Era; Chapter 12. First a Dream: Reagan; Chapter 13. The Vision Thing: George H. W. Bush and Clinton; Part VI. Deciders; Chapter 14. No Equivocation: George W. Bush; Chapter 15. The Last Mile: Obama; Conclusion: The Stream of History; Acknowledgments; Notes; Index

When Thomas Jefferson struck a deal for the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, he knew he was adding a new national power to those specified in the Constitution, but he also believed his actions were in the nation's best interest. His successors would follow his example, setting their own constitutional precedents. Tracing the evolution and expansion of the president's formal power, Untrodden Ground reveals the president to be the nation's most important law interpreter and examines how our commanders-in-chief have shaped the law through their responses to important issues of their time.           Re

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Political scientists have not always treated time as an important concept. While historians' commitment to explaining change over time is woven into their DNA, political scientists have only relatively recently begun, as Paul Pierson has noted, to "place politics in time." Bruff's historical approach to explaining how presidents' interpretations of their constitutional powers have established precedents that form a common law of presidential power is a welcome push in the direction of uniting historians' interest in change over time with political scientists' interest in theory building. Bruff's determination to address every president's effort "to interpret the Constitution for himself," however, makes it difficult at times for the reader to separate the precedent setters from the merely pedestrian. When Bruff (Univ. of Colorado Law School) does highlight the significant contributions of a Jefferson or a Lincoln to presidents' understanding of, for example, the appropriate uses of Lockean prerogative, he does not add much to what scholars already know about these presidents' interpretative stances. This book is, nonetheless, a useful reference for those interested in how the meeting of constitutional text and presidential practice has propelled the development of the presidency. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduate, graduate, and research collections. --Ronald P. Seyb, Skidmore College

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