Is the American Century Over?.

By: Nye, Joseph SMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandGlobal Futures: Publisher: Chicester : Wiley, 2015Description: 1 online resource (159 p.)ISBN: 9780745690100Subject(s): Power (Social sciences) -- United States -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Economic conditions -- 20th century | United States -- Foreign relations | United States -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Politics and government -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Is the American Century Over?DDC classification: 973.91 LOC classification: E743 -- .N94 2015ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
title page -- copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- 1 The Creation of the American Century -- 2 American Decline? -- 3 Challengers and Relative Decline -- 4 The Rise of China -- 5 Absolute Decline: Is America Like Rome? -- 6 Power Shifts and Global Complexity -- 7 Conclusions -- Further Reading -- Notes
Summary: For more than a century, the United States has been the world's most powerful state. Now some analysts predict that China will soon take its place. Does this mean that we are living in a post-American world? Will China's rapid rise spark a new Cold War between the two titans? In this compelling essay, world renowned foreign policy analyst, Joseph Nye, explains why the American century is far from over and what the US must do to retain its lead in an era of increasingly diffuse power politics. America's superpower status may well be tempered by its own domestic problems and China's economic
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title page -- copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- 1 The Creation of the American Century -- 2 American Decline? -- 3 Challengers and Relative Decline -- 4 The Rise of China -- 5 Absolute Decline: Is America Like Rome? -- 6 Power Shifts and Global Complexity -- 7 Conclusions -- Further Reading -- Notes

For more than a century, the United States has been the world's most powerful state. Now some analysts predict that China will soon take its place. Does this mean that we are living in a post-American world? Will China's rapid rise spark a new Cold War between the two titans? In this compelling essay, world renowned foreign policy analyst, Joseph Nye, explains why the American century is far from over and what the US must do to retain its lead in an era of increasingly diffuse power politics. America's superpower status may well be tempered by its own domestic problems and China's economic

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Nye (Harvard's Kennedy School of Government) provides a well-reasoned analysis of America's projected world position during the 21st century. Beginning with an exploration of the context for analyzing the American Century, including the degree to which the US has exercised a hegemonic role in the world, Nye moves to an examination of the extent to which the pattern of America's dominant position has mirrored that of previously dominant states. Nye provides a nuanced examination of how certain states, such as Japan or Russia, or regional organizations, such as the EU, have in the past seemed poised to challenge US dominance. Additionally, he reviews the potential for emergent powers, such as India, Brazil, or China, to challenge US dominance in the future. Although some topics, such as the potential impact of dysfunction in the US and Chinese political systems in responding to the pressing issues of US relative dominance, deserved greater emphasis, Nye provides a sound analysis of continued US dominance, despite factors of US relative decline, increased global complexity, and power diffusion to smaller states and NGOs. Summing Up: Recommended. All readership levels. --Christopher W. Herrick, Muhlenberg College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Joseph S.Nye, Jr. is University Distinguished Service Professor and former dean of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government

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