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On Global Citizenship : James Tully in Dialogue

By: Tully, James.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Critical Powers: Publisher: London : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014Description: 1 online resource (369 p.).ISBN: 9781849665162.Subject(s): Tully, James, 1946- -- Political and social views | World citizenship -- PhilosophyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: On Global Citizenship : James Tully in DialogueDDC classification: 323.6 LOC classification: JZ1320.4 .T85 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; HalfTitle; Series; Title; Copyright; Contents; List of Contributors; Series Editor's Foreword; Part One Lead Essay; 1 On Global Citizenship; 1. Introduction: Global citizenship as negotiated practices; 2. Two modes of citizenship: Preliminary sketch; Section One: Modern Citizenship; Section Two: Diverse Citizenship; Part Two Responses; 2 The Authority of Civic Citizens*; 1. Dictatorial versus democratic authority; 2. In authority's family; 3. Authority of command versus authority of connection: Five differences; 4. Conclusion; 3 James Tully's Agonistic Realism
1. Raymond Geuss's realism2. James Tully's realism; 3. Agonistic realism; 4 Pictures of Democratic Engagement: Claim-Making, Citizenization and the Ethos of Democracy*; 1. Contestation through the articulation of demands; 2. James Tully and practices of citizenization15; 3. Further reflections; 6. Contestation, claim-making and a democratic ethos; 5 To Act Otherwise: Agonistic Republicanism and Global Citizenship*; 1. Introduction; 2. Global virtue ethics: Agonistic citizenship and the arts of the self; 3. Political violence, empire and the limits of global justice; 4. Conclusion
6 Civil Disobedience as a Practice of Civic Freedom1. Introduction; 2. Rethinking civil disobedience; 3. Conclusion; 7 Modern versus Diverse Citizenship: Historical and Ideal Theory Perspectives; 1. Methodological issues; 2. An ideal theory approach; 3. Adjusting Tully's analysis; 4. Conclusion; 8 Instituting Civic Citizenship; 1. Orientations; 2. Institutions; 3. Non-sovereign institutions; 4. Conclusion; Part Three Reply; 9 On Global Citizenship: Replies to Interlocutors; 1. Introduction; 2. Anthony Simon Laden; 3. Bonnie Honig and Mark Stears; 4. Aletta J. Norval; 5. Duncan Bell
6. Robin Celikates7. Andrew Mason; 8. Adam Dunn and David Owen; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Global Citizenship develops James Tully's distinctive and influential approach to political philosophy, first outlined in his 2008 two-volume work <i>Public Philosophy in a New Key</i>, and applies it to the field of citizenship.
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Cover; HalfTitle; Series; Title; Copyright; Contents; List of Contributors; Series Editor's Foreword; Part One Lead Essay; 1 On Global Citizenship; 1. Introduction: Global citizenship as negotiated practices; 2. Two modes of citizenship: Preliminary sketch; Section One: Modern Citizenship; Section Two: Diverse Citizenship; Part Two Responses; 2 The Authority of Civic Citizens*; 1. Dictatorial versus democratic authority; 2. In authority's family; 3. Authority of command versus authority of connection: Five differences; 4. Conclusion; 3 James Tully's Agonistic Realism

1. Raymond Geuss's realism2. James Tully's realism; 3. Agonistic realism; 4 Pictures of Democratic Engagement: Claim-Making, Citizenization and the Ethos of Democracy*; 1. Contestation through the articulation of demands; 2. James Tully and practices of citizenization15; 3. Further reflections; 6. Contestation, claim-making and a democratic ethos; 5 To Act Otherwise: Agonistic Republicanism and Global Citizenship*; 1. Introduction; 2. Global virtue ethics: Agonistic citizenship and the arts of the self; 3. Political violence, empire and the limits of global justice; 4. Conclusion

6 Civil Disobedience as a Practice of Civic Freedom1. Introduction; 2. Rethinking civil disobedience; 3. Conclusion; 7 Modern versus Diverse Citizenship: Historical and Ideal Theory Perspectives; 1. Methodological issues; 2. An ideal theory approach; 3. Adjusting Tully's analysis; 4. Conclusion; 8 Instituting Civic Citizenship; 1. Orientations; 2. Institutions; 3. Non-sovereign institutions; 4. Conclusion; Part Three Reply; 9 On Global Citizenship: Replies to Interlocutors; 1. Introduction; 2. Anthony Simon Laden; 3. Bonnie Honig and Mark Stears; 4. Aletta J. Norval; 5. Duncan Bell

6. Robin Celikates7. Andrew Mason; 8. Adam Dunn and David Owen; Bibliography; Index

Global Citizenship develops James Tully's distinctive and influential approach to political philosophy, first outlined in his 2008 two-volume work <i>Public Philosophy in a New Key</i>, and applies it to the field of citizenship.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James Tully is Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Law, Indigenous Governance and Philosophy at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and an Emeritus Fellow of the Trudeau Foundation. His publications include Strange Multiplicity: Constitutionalism in an Age of Diversity (1995) and Public Philosophy in a New Key (2009, 2 volumes), the winner of the C. B. Macpherson Prize in 2010. Tully was the recipient of a Killam Prize for the Humanities in 2010, awarded by the Canada Council for the Arts in recognition of his distinguished career and outstanding contribution to scholarship.

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